Generation gap in Japan

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A recent survey from Yahoo! Japan Value Insight (who seem to have been bought out by Macromill Research) looked at generational differences in thinking for four key generations.

Demographics

Over the 22nd and 23th of June 2010 800 members of the Yahoo! monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. All the respondents lived in Tokyo or one of the three surrounding prefectures of Kanagawa, Saitama and Chiba. The four generations were the Bubble generation, people born between 1962 and 1967 and now aged 43 to 48; the Ice Age generation, people born between 1971 and 1975 and now aged 35 to 39; the Yutori (education with breathing space) generation, people born between 1985 and 1990 and now aged 20 to 25; and the Bubble Junior generation, people born between 1992 and 1995 and now aged 15 to 18. For each generation 100 males and 100 females responded.

It’s difficult to draw any conclusions, I feel, from this one snapshot in time. How much of the variation is just down to simple age differences and how much is down to the environment people grew up in? For instance, it’s obvious that younger people would be more keen on having a portable audio player.
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It’s a dog’s life in Japan

Alternatively subtitled “Over half of single Japanese sleep with their dogs”, but that sort of headline has got me into trouble before! When Yahoo! Japan Value Insight took a look at dog ownership, they found out that and many other interesting facts.

Demographics

Between the 25th and 27th of June 2010 560 members of the Yahoo! monitor group living in Tokyo or the three surrounding prefectures with only one dog completed a private internet-based questionnaire. There were 100 of both men and women who were married with children, 68 men and 100 women married with no children, and 92 men and 100 women unmarried and living alone. The ages of each sub-group ranged from 20 to 59 years old. There was also another 100 of both men and women unmarried but living at home, but their answers were not reported.

I’m a cat person myself with a mild dog phobia, so I cannot but be amazed at the stupidity of the owners. On the other hand if it were felines, I would fully accept the results as a balanced representation of the respect humans have for their cat masters!

Hanshin Tigers and beer dogs

Photo from Chi (in Japan) on flickr.
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Housework styles of Japanese women

Working single women, how often do you wash clothes? graph of japanese statisticsThis very detailed piece of research into women, housework and domestic appliances by Yahoo! Japan Value Insight revealed a lot of information about what the average Japanese kitchen looks like.

Demographics

Between the 9th and 12th of June 2010 800 women aged between 20 and 39 completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 25% fell into each of the age groups 20 to 24, 25 to 29, 30 to 34 and 35 to 39. 400 of the women in the sample were in full-time work, and 400 were either full-time housewives or out of work. All of them lived within the Tokyo area; either Tokyo itself or the neighbouring prefectures of Saitama, Chiba and Kanagawa. Finally, those living with parents, siblings or other relatives, or living with friends were eliminated, thus all the working singles would be living alone.

Although I’ve detailed the demographics above, you’ll note that the totals in the questions below don’t add up to 800, but the reason for that is unclear.

In Q4 I’m also unsure of the difference between not wasting water and not sending too much down the drain.
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Japan, Korea and China look at each other

How do you see Japan's future economic situation? graph of japanese statisticsThis is a survey from the start of March that I only got round to translating now, but the information is hopefully worth the wait! The survey was conducted by Yahoo! Japan Value Insight in Japan, Embrain.co.ltd in South Korea, and INFO BRIDGE CHINA Co., Ltd in Japan, South Korea, and China awareness.

Demographics

Between the 29th of February and 4th of March 2008 500 Japanese, 547 South Koreans, and 524 Chinese took part in a closed internet-based questionnaire. All respondents were aged between 20 and 59, but a detailed breakdown was not provided. The Chinese respondents were from all over China, but given availability of internet access, there was perhaps a significant bias towards middle-class city dwellers in their sample.

Note that from now on I will use just Korea, but I always mean South Korea.

Q2A is interesting, in that there is a very noticable lack of pride in their own products amongst young Japanese. The reason for this disaffection would be well worth investigating – I cannot think of any particular issue that would make youths and youths only react in this way. Indeed, given the number of scandals last year involving Japanese products, foodstuffs in particular, I am very surprised that there is no real lack of pride amongst older people, although perhaps given the context of the survey, people were thinking internationally, so stale biscuits don’t really affect Japan as a global brand.
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