One in four Japanese is totally lacking in wisdom… teeth

Advertisement

This short but interesting survey by Katte2Q into dentists and teeth revealed a few interesting numbers regarding Japanese teeth.

The Japanese for wisdom teeth is 親知らず, oyashirazu, or literally “without parents’ knowing”, which might suggest to the casual reader that it has something to do with one’s parents not noticing their adult child’s back teeth appearing, unlike with baby teeth and the main adult teeth. However, I have seen some sites that explain this further as meaning one’s parents tended to be dead before the teeth appeared…

I’ve not had mine removed, but my dentists have never mentioned anything about them, although I’ve got a slight (false?) memory of seeing an X-Ray with the bottom ones horizonal rather than vertical. Next check-up I’ll have to remember to ask!

Here’s an interesting dentist’s sign:

Untitled
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Oral care much more of an issue these days

A popular stereotype of the Japanese is wonky teeth, which whilst there is a lot of truth to it, the awareness of good oral health has improved in not just my opinion, but in the opinion of the Orange Page’s monitor group, according to the results of this survey into oral care. This survey was conducted in conjunction with Philips

I’ve finally started using an inter-dental brush for bits of food that get stuck; I cannot floss as I don’t like touching my teeth with my hands, and indeed the dental hygienist flossing for me is more stressful than the drill! I used to use an electric brush, but I never really enjoyed it, and gave up once the battery stopped holding its recharge.

Here’s a polite Japanese toothbrush found probably in a hotel’s amenity set:

IMG_6573
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments

Too much bother main reason for avoiding dentist

Do you think you ought to go to the dentist? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey from iShare on a favourite topic of mine, Japanese aversion for dentists, took a slightly different and rather interesting look at the oft-covered matter of Japanese teeth.

Demographics

Between the 14th and 17th of January 2009 468 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private online questionnaire. 52.6% of the sample were male, 11.3% in their twenties, 53.2% in their thirties, 26.3% in their forties, 6.4% in their fifties, and 2.8% either in their teens or aged sixty or older.

I actually need to go to the dentist (it’s 9 months since my last cleaning) but… I don’t really like phones in English, so Japanese is twice as bad! The dentist himself I can most strongly recommend, and his prices are quite reasonable, especially compared to the ham-fisted thief that my wife visits.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments (3)

Electric toothbrush usage in Japan

Have you used an electric toothbrush? graph of japanese statisticsAfter mentioning in a survey earlier this week about how smoking was my second-favourite survey topic, along comes this survey from DMSDRIVE Research Inc on my favourite topic in Japan, tooth care, in particular electric toothbrushes. As a bonus, this survey also touches on the use of this equipment by smokers.

Demographics

Between the 20th and 27th of August 2008 9,029 memebers of the DIMSDRIVE monitor group completed a private online questionnaire. 51.6% of the sample were female, 1.2% in their teens, 13.4% in their twenties, 33.8% in their thirties, 29.9% in their forties, 14.9% in their fifties, and 6.8% aged sixty or older. As a bonus statistic, 27.2% were current smokers, 19.3% ex-smokers, and 53.5% had never smoked.

Note that Sunstar make cheap-and-cheerful battery-operated toothbrushes that they sell alongside their manual counterparts in almost all pharmacies and supermarkets, where as all the other manufacturers make proper brushes.

I have a Braun Oral-B that I bought with points from a credit card, but I only use it at the weekends as cleaning and drying after every use during the week is too much bother!
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments

Japanese oral care

How often do you usually brush your teeth? graph of japanese statisticsThis week too was a bit thin for silly surveys, so the best I can do for you today is a not really silly and not really very long, but quite interesting pair of surveys from DIMSDRIVE Research’s 133rd ranking survey on two Japanese teeth-related subjects, frequency of brushing and oral care other than brushing.

Demographics

Both surveys were conducted between the 16th and 24th of January 2008. The first had 12,020 respondents with 52.9% female, the second 11,963 with 53.0% female.

You’ll notice in the second question that regular check-ups feature really quite low, and flossing or inter-dental brushing (uggh, dislike both and don’t bother myself) feature nowhere, not even in the detailed run-down of the results by age group. Also, there are only about 5,000 votes in total, which means about half the population don’t take extra any oral care bar brushing. For those of you who have experienced oyaji breath you might be surprised to learn that it was young men rather than older ones who were more likely to brush less than once a day or not at all.

I also chew Xylitol gum after every meal at home; PLUS X Gum from Lotte is exceptionally nice.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

What Japanese hate about going to the dentist

One of my favourite subjects, and one of the perennial favourites of Google searchers, is Japanese teeth. With today being Dental Caries (Decay) Prevention Day (in Japanese, one way of reading June 4th is mu-shi, which is the first two syllables of the phrase 虫歯予防デー, mushiba yobou de-, or the aforementioned Dental Caries Prevention Day), let’s take a timely look with goo Ranking at what people are most afraid of when going to the dentist. Note that this survey excludes the contents of the treatment itself.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Almost half of Japanese let their oral problems fester

How often do you have regular dental check-ups? graph of japanese opinionBack to one of my favourite subjects, Japanese teeth! This time, it was MyVoice who conducted the survey of 13,741 members of their internet monitor panel. The survey was conducted at the start of June this year, with 46% of the respondents male, 3% in their teens, 22% in their twenties, 39% in their thirties, 24% in their forties, and 12% in their fifties or older.

I’m just finished my regular dental check, although this time due to various reasons it was about seven months since the last one, so I needed one filling replaced due to some decay beneath it. All in all, including ultrasonic cleaning, the bill came to just over 3,000 yen with bog-standard Japanese national medical insurance.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Keep 20 teeth till your 80

This slightly broken English in the post title is the catchphrase of not just Osaka’s, but a national promotion to persuade people to view looking after their teeth as a lifelong commitment. I’ve covered teeth in a number of other posts, but the statistical fact I learnt yesterday on a train covered in posters for said campaign was that current 80 year olds (in Osaka only? in the whole of Japan?) only have on average around four teeth left.

The reasons for this poor record are not just as revealed in the earlier surveys, a lack of regular care and maintentance by a professional, but also a large number of dentists who would often rather just yank a tooth instead of repairing it. There’s also more than a fair share of incompetent dentists, of course, but fortunately mine doesn’t fall into either category.

Read more on: ,

Comments

Japanese brush 2.4 times a day

How many times a day do you brush your teeth? graph of japanese opinionIn a survey performed over a week at the end of May, infoPLANT looked at how the Japanese brush their teeth. They used their usual method, a self-selecting questionnaire presented through the DoCoMo iMode menu system. They got 6,585 valid responses to the survey, with 67.0% of the sample female.

The state of Japanese teeth are one of common stereotypes one hears of, and a topic that I have featured before, in a translation of a survey on this topic last year by MyVoice.

I’m surprised that about three in ten brush soon after getting up, when after breakfast would be better, I believe; and less women brush before going to bed rather than after breakfast, although perhaps if those brushing at bath time, which is traditionally just before bed time, is added in, we would see the last thing at night figure would be higher.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Why Japanese teeth are often wonky

Last December, MyVoice carried out a survey about brushing teeth. In Japan, dentist skill, and dental hygiene, or lack thereof, is often a subject of ridicule by the foreign contingent, but I seem to have been lucky and found a very good dentist. Actually, if it hadn’t been for my Japanese dentist and all the work he did (yes, I have British teeth) I don’t think I’d have had the confidence to meet my wife.

They sought the opinion 16,013 people via a web-based survey from the internet community “MyVoice”, of whom 42% were male, and found, amongst other things, that not many people at all attend regular check-ups.

Q1: Each day, how many times do you normally brush your teeth?

Don’t usually do so1%
Once25%
Twice53%
Thrice19%
Four or more times2%

Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments Trackback / Pingback (1)