Coffee Japan’s favourite soft drink

Advertisement

Compared to three years ago, my bottled tea drinking frequency has... graph of japanese statisticsThis recent survey from MyVoice into tea and tea-like drinks, their second on the subject, with the first from two years ago translated here) found actually that coffee was the top drink, replacing green tea at the top of the list.

Demographics

Over the first five days of April 2009 15,578 members of the MyVoice internet community successfully completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 2% in their teens, 15% in their twenties, 35% in their thirties, 30% in their forties, and 18% aged fifty or older.

Recently when it comes to packaged drinks I’ve been more of a diet coke person, but I drink mostly black tea at work and green and houji (roasted green tea) at home. That’s a good point, does the “other Japanese tea” in Q1 include houji, or does it get counted with green tea? My personal feeling is that it falls under the other Japanese tea category.

In the following questions, “tea-related drinks” covers green tea, other Japanese tea, Chinese tea, black (Indian) tea, and blended tea (either tea tea or other tea-like base) plus other herbs.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments Trackback / Pingback (1)

Mellow Monk Green Tea

As an aside from my usual surveys, here is a short commercial message!

I’ve added a new advertiser to my blog, Mellow Monk’s Green Teas, a reseller of finest Japanese green tea to primarily the American market (shipping back to Japan is a bit coals-to-Newcastle-ish!), selected from family-run farms in not the famous tea growing districts of Shizuoka or Uji, but on the southern Kyushu island. All their teas are shipped vacuum-sealed, which means you drink it just as fresh as I can here in Japan.

Mellow Monk’s range includes not just green teas, but also genmaicha, green tea with toasted rice, a wonderfully nutty flavour that I find really warming on cold days, and houjicha, roasted (thus lower in caffeine) tea. Their houjicha is interesting in that they only lightly roast, thus retaining a lot of the colour in the brew, rather than the brown shades that I am familiar with. Typing that description has made me want to order some now!

Green tea has lots of claimed health benefits; it’s rich in anti-oxidants which has been shown to be beneficial in protecting against many lifestyle diseases. Japan has a very high male smoking rate, but a lower incidence of lung cancer than other countries. However, as green tea drinking rates drop, faster than the smoking rates, deaths from lung cancer are increasing. One wonders if there is any connection. The distinctive astringent flavour of green tea comes from catechin, the particular anti-oxidant green tea is rich in, a substance that gets heavily promoted in Japan as an aid to weight loss and combating the dreaded “metabo“, metabolic syndrome.

Regardless of any of these real or alleged health benefits, green tea is a lovely drink that goes very well with food; every night at home we always have either green tea or houjicha with our dinner, whether it be a Japanese or Western menu. It’s also a very sensible drink in the current economic climate; I find that just one heaped small teaspoon suffices for a pot for two (even using decent-sized mugs) and a refill brews just as nice a second or even third cup each. That’s about 20 cents per litre of Mellow Monk’s standard leaf.

Green tea is perhaps a flavour that takes a little getting used to, so if you’re new to it, I would recommend either Mellow Monk’s‘s houjicha or genmaicha as milder drinks, or just use less leaves or more water when brewing!

Read more on: ,

Comments (4)

Ask What Japan Thinks of tea-related drinks: survey 2 of 2

How often do you buy teas in 500ml bottles? graph of japanese opinion[survey 1] [survey 2]

Between the 22nd and 29th of March 2007 DIMSDRIVE Research surveyed its internet community regarding tea and tea-like drinks from plastic bottles. This is the second of a pair of rather similar surveys on tea drinks.

Demographics

6,477 members of the DIMSDRIVE Research internet community completed a private internet-based survey. 40.3% were male, 0.5% in their teens, 16.8% in their twenties, 36.5% in their thirties, 28.6% in their forties, 13.2% in their fifties, and 4.4% aged sixty or older.

This is a survey I’ve been looking for for a while, as I have wanted to do an “Ask What Japan Thinks” on tea, as I do get a few visitors looking for this sort of information, so I hope the information helps you out.

Note that in Japan plastic bottles are called PET bottles, with PET standing for polyethylene terephthalate, it appears. These bottles are usually recycled separately, so most public areas have a bin for these types of bottles only. You are supposed to take the cap off (some bins now have a separate opening for them) and the label, but I must admit to not doing either, although I do always use the correct bin.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments Trackbacks / Pingbacks (3)

Ask What Japan Thinks of tea-related drinks: survey 1 of 2

How often do you drink plastic bottled tea-related drinks? graph of japanese opinion[survey 1] [survey 2]

Over the first five days of April 2007 MyVoice surveyed its internet community regarding tea and tea-like drinks. This is the first of a pair of rather similar surveys on tea-related drinks.

Demographics

17,539 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private internet-based survey. 54% were female, 2% in their teens, 19% in their twenties, 39% in their thirties, 26% in their forties, and 14% in their fifties.

This is a survey I’ve been looking for for a while, as I have wanted to do an “Ask What Japan Thinks” on tea, as I do get a few visitors looking for this sort of information, so I hope the information helps you out.

Note that in Japan plastic bottles are called PET bottles, with PET standing for polyethylene terephthalate, it appears. These bottles are usually recycled separately, so most public areas have a bin for these types of bottles only. You are supposed to take the cap off (some bins now have a separate opening for them) and the label, but I must admit to not doing either, although I do always use the correct bin.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments Trackbacks / Pingbacks (3)