Obtaining information more important than friendships for Japanese Facebookers

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Do you disclose your real name on SNSs? graph of japanese statisticsThe results of this survey from goo Research into SNS (Social Networking Service) usage as reported by japan.internet.com produces a couple of headscratch-worthy results, the one in the title and that maintaining friendships is more important than deepening them.

Demographics

Between the 8th and 11th of May 2012 1,076 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 15.9% in their teens, 18.6% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 16.3% in their forties, 15.7% in their fifties, and 12.0% aged sixty or older.

On second thoughts, perhaps maintaining is more important than deepening or widening from a Japanese perspective? Class reunions, for instance, are a regular feature of many people’s lives here, for all of primary, secondary and tertiary education levels. Perhaps these events are viewed more as an obligation, thus Facebook and mixi provide an easy way to link together and fulfil one’s societal role?

For me, both obtaining and generating information is most important, but that’s more because I am an anti-social git…
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Fifteen ways Facebook friends annoy Japanese

Or any other SNS for that matter, in this goo Ranking survey looking at what words or actions by friends on social networking services rile people.

Demographics

Over the 29th of February and the 1st of March 2012 1,175 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 61.4% of the sample were female, 10.0% in their teens, 16.5% in their twenties, 29.3% in their thirties, 24.1% in their forties, 10.6% in their fifties, and 9.5% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I don’t really spend enough time on SNSes to have many of my own, although for some reason friends pushing the Like or +1 button on posts that I disagree with does annoy me a little. Thinking a bit more about it, I find things tiresome rather than annoying, I suppose, but then I am an anti-social git…
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Pen and paper beats Web 2.0 for keeping in touch

goo Research recently took a look at keeping in touch with close friends, with the surprising result in the headline reported in japan.internet.com.

Demographics

Between the 21st and 24th of March 2012 1,082 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 17.8% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 16.1% in their forties, 15.6% in their fifties, and 12.3% aged sixty or older.

Knowing what I know about Japan, email and telephone being top are not surprising to me, but I was most taken aback by ordinary post coming in third! Thinking more closely, the mixi, Twitter and Facebook figures correlate to the penetration of these SNS within Japan, but I suspect that the old-fashioned post includes New Year postcards, where even I often exchange annual greetings with ex-colleagues who have moved to other divisions within my employer.
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SNS New Year cards

Have you ever used mixi's New Year postcard intermediary service? graph of japanese statisticsWith the last posting day before New Year getting ever closer, this survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, into New Year postcards is a reminder to us all to get ours finished.

Demographics

Between the 29th of November and the 1st of December 2011 1,083 members of the goo Research online monitor panel completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.9% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 18.3% in their twenties, 21.4% in their thirties, 16.2% in their forties, 15.7% in their fifties, and 11.9% aged sixty or older.

I haven’t actually got round to even ordering my New Year postcards yet, and as I’ve been at our work Christmas end of year party tonight I’m in no fit state, so that’s another day closer to the deadline… Note, I’ve prepared this post ahead of time, so any mistakes are just the usual me, not the beer’s fault!
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SNS privacy issues in Japan

This short report from japan.internet.com on a survey from goo Research on SNS (Social Network Service) privacy produced some interesting results that seem to run counter to the popular image of Japanese SNS users.

Demographics

Between the 16th and 19th of May 2011 1,082 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.2% of the sample were male, 16.4% in their teens, 18.8% in their twenties, 21.5% in their thirties, 15.8% in their forties, 15.3% in their fifties, and 12.2% aged sixty or older.

Note that in this survey, Twitter counts as an SNS, although I’ve never really understood why. Also note that the public viewing described below might be limited to only friends.
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mixi top SNS, Twitter top blogging service in Japan

How do you use video sharing services? graph of japanese statisticsThe results from this recent survey from goo Research and reported on by japan.internet.com into online services may not be too reliable for SNS as number two and number three in the list, GREE and Mobage Town, are both mobile phone-based social gaming sites and I feel that the demographic they appeal to differs significantly from the more PC-oriented goo monitor group. I have no data to back up this, so take it with an appropriately-sized pinch of salt.

Demographics

Over the 25th and 26th of January 2010 1,102 members of the goo Research online monitor panel completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 18.5% in their twenties, 20.9% in their thirties, 15.9% in their forties, 15.6% in their fifties and 12.6% aged sixty or older.

I’m on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and even have uploaded a couple of videos to YouTube.
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Pseudo-anonymous New Year nengajo postcards through mixi

Do you know what 'mixi nengajo' is? graph of japanese statisticsJust in time for the New Year nengajo postcard season, goo Research performed a survey, reported on by japan.internet.com, into that subject, with the report focusing on a service from mixi, Japan’s largest SNS, that allows people to send physical postcards to virtual friends, while maintaining the pseudo-anonymity of people’s online handles.

Demographics

Over the 7th and 8th of December 2010 1,098 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.9% of the sample were male, 16.8% in their teens, 18.1% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 16.1% in their forties, 15.6% in their fifties, and 11.8% aged sixty or older.

Since Facebook doesn’t offer such a service for Christmas cards (as far as I know), I can conclude that either such a degree of privacy is of no great concern to the average Facebook user or that the average user has no urge to send cards to their Facebook friends. Perhaps it might be more of the second, as surveys have found that Japanese have a significantly lower number of social network friends, indicating that they are more discerning about who they befriend.

Q3 is a quite surprising result from my point of view; note that the question refers to disclosing your address to mixi only, not to your contacts on the SNS, yet 70% don’t feel too happy about doing so.
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mixi users prefered its exclusivity

Do you currently use the SNS site mixi? graph of japanese statisticsWith mobile phone-based SNSes (well, they are more like Social Gaming Services) currently flooding television screens with advertisements, it’s easy to forget about the granddaddy of them all, mixi. goo Research haven’t as this was the subject of a survey they conducted that was reported on by japan.internet.com.

Demographics

Between the 1st and 4th of October 2010 1,083 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.3% in their teens, 18.3% in their twenties, 21.5% in their thirties, 16.3% in their forties, 15.6% in their fifties, and 12.0% aged sixty or older.

I kept meaning to sign up for mixi, and even got an invite from someone, but even now with it going invite-free this March I’ve never felt the urge to sign up, as it would just be something else to ignore along with What Japan Thinks on Facebook.
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Microblogging in Japan

Have you seen or heard about microblogging services? graph of japanese statisticsA curious set of results were produced by this recent survey by goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, into microblogging. Although (or should that be ‘because’) the report did not define what a microblog was, under 8% reported having used or read one, yet just over 20% reported having been Twitter users, yet Twitter was the very first microblog.

Demographics

Between the 13th and 17th of September 2010 1,079 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.7% of the sample were male, 16.4% in their teens, 18.5% in their twenties, 21.0% in their thirties, 16.0% in their forties, 15.8% in their fifties, and 12.2% aged sixty or older.

However, there are other microblogs that are more like real blogs but with a text limit and without the social features of Twitter, but I cannot name any offhand! I’m sure there’s a WordPress plugin, though, to turn your blog into a Twitter for one. A quick Google finds these two for starters.

Regarding Q2SQ, I’ve updated my status line on Facebook exactly once.
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Almost no music SNS users in Japan

Do you participate in a music SNS? graph of japanese statisticsI’ve never heard the term music SNS before, although now that I read what it is I understand what they are referring to. The survey on this subject was from iBridge Research Plus and reported on by japan.internet.com.

Demographics

On the 14th of June 2010 300 members of the iBridge research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 51.7% of the sample were male, 10.3% in their twenties, 34.3% in their thirties, 34.7% in their forties, 15.0% in their fifties, and 5.7% in their sixties.

I like music, but I’ve just fallen out of the habit of listening to it, so music SNSs are even less appealing than straightforward SNSs! The last time I listened to music off my own bat was this rather entertaining number:


Research results

First of all, seven people disliked music to some degree, so they were eliminated and the remaining 293 asked the following.

Q1A: Do you like listening, singing, or performing music? (Sample size=293)

Listening only57.0%
Singing only3.8%
Performing only1.7%
Both listening and singing26.6%
Both listening and performing2.7%
Both singing and performing0.7%
Listening, singing and performing7.5%

Another way of looking at the data is this:

Q1B: Do you like listening, singing, or performing music? (Sample size=300)

 VotesPercentage
Listening27591.7%
Singing11337.7%
Performing3712.3%
None of them72.3%

Q2A: Do you participate in a music SNS? (Sample size=293)

Yes (to SQ)1.7%
No51.5%
Don’t know what it is46.8%

Adding in the music haters from above we get:

Q2B: Do you participate in a music SNS? (Sample size=300)

Yes (to SQ)1.7%
No50.3%
Don’t know what it is45.7%
Don’t like music2.3%

Q2SQ: Which music SNSs do you participate in? (Sample size=5, multiple answer)

MySpace4
Uta-uga1
Uta-suki1
last.fm0
Natalie0
Jamming Music Station0
MenboScape0
Gosnavi0
syncl0
yanpon.com0
AngesParty0
Other1

The sample size above is too small to make percentages meaningful.

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