Memories of feature phones that haven’t faded

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Although smartphones are far more feature-rich, this survey from goo Ranking took a look at what feature phone memories people felt most nostalgic for.

From an internal point of view, feature phones have been completely superceded by Android and iOS-powered phones, but externally, a few local manufacturers are making Android-based flip-phones, which incidentally I think I can upgrade my pretty useless and too featureless to be called a feature phone Wi-Fi-based work mobile to, which might be interesting from a technical point of view to see what they are doing.

My best memory is a variant of number 3, the button that was one push to open the phone.

I remember this phone! One Seg television, and the screen half on a rather over-large joint that could flip either vertically or horizontally.

TV + Cellphone = Jealousy
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Ahead of Mario and Pikachu, which character most represents Japan?

goo Ranking posed an interesting question, asking its monitor group to select the characters that best represent Japan. The criteria for selection were not clearly stated, but the main aim seems to have been to find the character that is most popular with the average person on the street.

From a foreign perspective, I’d have selected Pikachu and Mario, plus perhaps Godzilla as internationally recognisable symbols of Japan.

Anyway, here’s a whole gang of Doraemons:

Doraemon
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Little things that hurt something awful

This survey from goo Ranking looks at little things with large pain.

Number 1 is of course a too common pain, but one that doesn’t feature is perhaps because the sample size is too young – in cold weather the skin on the back of my hands dry out and skin splits spontaneously and bleeds out, then getting cold water or even just cold breeze into the wounds, or worse rubbing in the very ointment that is specially designed for these kinds of cuts.

Here’s a different kind of pain that is easier to capture in a photo, pain cars, the literal translation of itasha, dressing up your ride with dodgy cartoon characters. This is one of few family-friendly images I could find…

Ita G Festa
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Unnecessary symbols in artists’ names

The Artist Formerly Known As Prince found it necessary to become symbol to escape from contracts, but in Japan there are a good number of people adding symbols to their stage names, which became the topic of this survey into who Japanese feel have unnecessary symbols in their names.

I’ll transliterate the artists’ names to English, but keep the symbols as is, just in case people who are less familiar with Japanese aren’t quite sure which is the strange symbol. Also note that some of the names are already in the Roman alphabet, so I’ll retain these as is. I’ve also noticed that WordPress has converted the first two people’s symbols to graphics, for some reason.

Gor☆geous (a space pirate, apparently), at least has a reason for the ☆ in his name, as you can see from this video:


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Overused tropes in hospital dramas

This survey from goo Ranking took a look at what things often happen in hospital dramas.

I’m not sure how well the word “tropes” is known; Google tells me it is “a significant or recurrent theme; a motif”, but I am most familiar with it through the web site TV Tropes, a site that takes an often humorous look (and a too-often over-obsessive look) at themes that pop up in popular media; here is their take on number 1, Miracles Occur, or as they entitle it Unexplained Recovery.

No hospital pictures to hand, so instead here’s blood-typed towels

Blood type towel
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Stuff we all used to experience with CRT televisions

goo Ranking seems to be on a nostalgia trip recently, with tonight’s looking at things from the CRT television age that people can empathise with.

The survey consists of people under the age of 39, so I’m not convinved they would have experienced black and white. I’m also not sure what the distinctive sound when turning on was…

I’m also trying to remember what channel we used for our home computer – 37 comes to mind, but which push button we set it to escapes me. Channel 2 would of course have been set to BBC2, so it wasn’t that.

Here’s an old Panasonic television from 1983:

Vintage Panasonic Miniature Black And White Television With AM-FM Radio, Model TR-1020P, 1.5 Inch Diagonal Screen, Made In Japan, Manufacture Date August 1983
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When Japanese feel they are getting old

goo Ranking looked something that comes to us all, when people feel they are getting old.

Sadly I can identify with far too many on the list! However, referring to the first number 43, I must have started getting old in university or so! Although I have no memory,my wife often reminds me (number 4 at work?) that I even farted on our first date.

Talking of farts, here’s a poor translation ending up as accidental poetry and represents my policy for bottom burps:

LOL farts
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Bad habits the Japanese just can’t quit

Today’s fun survey from goo Ranking is a look at what bad habits the Japanese want to quit but just can’t.

I must admit to doing quite a lot of them, but there’s few I’d like to stop, although plucking nose hairs in the office is top of my to-do list.

Here’s a multi-lingual sign warning against number 4, using smartphone while walking.

No Walking Smartphone!
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Obscure yet interesting magazines

I’m not sure who ranked the magazines as “interesting”, or even what criteria interestingness was judged, but there’s some odd titles in this survey from goo Ranking of obscure yet actually interesting magazines people would like to read.

I have no clue why snails poll so high; perhaps there is some love for them (are they tasty?) amongst the Japanese people. The Buddhist priest and funeral magazines would be perhaps interesting for insider information – Buddhist funerals (and on-going yearly rites, grave maintenance fees, etc) as performed by your local temple are remarkably expensive, so it might be interesting to see how it is discussed behind the scenes.

I don’t find “Automatic Recognition Monthly” obscure in the least, and we probably have a subscription at work somewhere…

Here’s a issue of “Linux for Schoolgirls”, or something…

Ubuntu Magazine - Japan
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Post-war common sense that is inconceivable now

This survey from goo Ranking took a look at what post-war common sense things are now inconceivable. The “post-war” era was defined in this survey as the Showa Era, 25th December 1926 to 7th January 1989, the reign of Emperor Hirohito.

For number 20, I hear that many schools still serve up whale once a year or so.

At number 26, I’m not really sure what is so incredible about 100 yen for a soft drink can; although if one goes to a vending machine or a convenience store and pays full price, a Coke will be about 140 yen – just 40% inflation in 30 years – but 100 yen in a supermarket is quite believable, and a quick check of net supermarkets tells me it’s about 80 yen per can when buying a case of 24.

For number 30, similar to number 26, the price currently is merely 260 yen, another 30% over 30 year increase, with 8% of that being due to sales tax, and it didn’t actually reach the 200 yen price until 1996, 7 years after the end of the Showa Era!

The bullet train is now all non-smoking except for air-tight booths in some carriages, although the first time I rode on one it still allowed smoking in certain carriages, including the one I had chosen in my ignorance!

2010_05_130025
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