Stuff we all used to experience with CRT televisions

Advertisement

goo Ranking seems to be on a nostalgia trip recently, with tonight’s looking at things from the CRT television age that people can empathise with.

The survey consists of people under the age of 39, so I’m not convinved they would have experienced black and white. I’m also not sure what the distinctive sound when turning on was…

I’m also trying to remember what channel we used for our home computer – 37 comes to mind, but which push button we set it to escapes me. Channel 2 would of course have been set to BBC2, so it wasn’t that.

Here’s an old Panasonic television from 1983:

Vintage Panasonic Miniature Black And White Television With AM-FM Radio, Model TR-1020P, 1.5 Inch Diagonal Screen, Made In Japan, Manufacture Date August 1983
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments

When Japanese feel they are getting old

goo Ranking looked something that comes to us all, when people feel they are getting old.

Sadly I can identify with far too many on the list! However, referring to the first number 43, I must have started getting old in university or so! Although I have no memory,my wife often reminds me (number 4 at work?) that I even farted on our first date.

Talking of farts, here’s a poor translation ending up as accidental poetry and represents my policy for bottom burps:

LOL farts
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments

Bad habits the Japanese just can’t quit

Today’s fun survey from goo Ranking is a look at what bad habits the Japanese want to quit but just can’t.

I must admit to doing quite a lot of them, but there’s few I’d like to stop, although plucking nose hairs in the office is top of my to-do list.

Here’s a multi-lingual sign warning against number 4, using smartphone while walking.

No Walking Smartphone!
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments (1)

Obscure yet interesting magazines

I’m not sure who ranked the magazines as “interesting”, or even what criteria interestingness was judged, but there’s some odd titles in this survey from goo Ranking of obscure yet actually interesting magazines people would like to read.

I have no clue why snails poll so high; perhaps there is some love for them (are they tasty?) amongst the Japanese people. The Buddhist priest and funeral magazines would be perhaps interesting for insider information – Buddhist funerals (and on-going yearly rites, grave maintenance fees, etc) as performed by your local temple are remarkably expensive, so it might be interesting to see how it is discussed behind the scenes.

I don’t find “Automatic Recognition Monthly” obscure in the least, and we probably have a subscription at work somewhere…

Here’s a issue of “Linux for Schoolgirls”, or something…

Ubuntu Magazine - Japan
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Post-war common sense that is inconceivable now

This survey from goo Ranking took a look at what post-war common sense things are now inconceivable. The “post-war” era was defined in this survey as the Showa Era, 25th December 1926 to 7th January 1989, the reign of Emperor Hirohito.

For number 20, I hear that many schools still serve up whale once a year or so.

At number 26, I’m not really sure what is so incredible about 100 yen for a soft drink can; although if one goes to a vending machine or a convenience store and pays full price, a Coke will be about 140 yen – just 40% inflation in 30 years – but 100 yen in a supermarket is quite believable, and a quick check of net supermarkets tells me it’s about 80 yen per can when buying a case of 24.

For number 30, similar to number 26, the price currently is merely 260 yen, another 30% over 30 year increase, with 8% of that being due to sales tax, and it didn’t actually reach the 200 yen price until 1996, 7 years after the end of the Showa Era!

The bullet train is now all non-smoking except for air-tight booths in some carriages, although the first time I rode on one it still allowed smoking in certain carriages, including the one I had chosen in my ignorance!

2010_05_130025
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments Trackback / Pingback (1)

△□○ and other strange Japanese company names

I’m not sure how well this works as a translation, and I’m not sure how well my translations work, but this look by goo Ranking at over-stand-out company names that offer little clue as to what they actually do.

Number one seems an odd choice to me – it is just the present participle of one of the very first verb one learns, especially given the second name. Actually it comes from an innocent source; the company was originally “Sutematsu the Blacksmith”, which was shortened to “Yarisute”, based on the term(?) “Yari (spear) Sutei (not sure of what this means!)” and dropping the last “i”. However, in slang yari-sute is literally “to do and throw away”, or a One Night Stand.

On number 3’s website (a charter bus company, it seems) there is no explanation as to the origin of the “mokkori” part of the name, which is most well-known as part of the name of the pictured moss-ball character, Marimokkori:

marimokkori
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments

Women’s overdone ultraviolet blocking techniques

With summer coming up, goo Ranking took a look at what ultraviolet blocking techniques turn people right off. As is usual for these questionnaires, people selected the worst from a list of options.

I think the long black sleeve-like arm covers are the worst, followed by (shh, my wife does it too) those who won’t even go onto the balcony for five minutes without rubbing it on everywhere. I am hopelessly pale with next to no melanin to protect me, yet I manage to survive a 15 minute walk from the train station to work without getting burnt to a crisp.

Anyway, here is some essential advice when choosing sunglasses:

IF IT IS A TRAVEL, IT IS THIS SUNGLASSES!
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments

Amazon happenings that Japanese can relate to

I’m not a big Amazon user, but I can still empathise with many on this list of Amazon happenings.

Last night I saw a news item on the dark side of Amazon and other net shopping; many areas that had already lost local shops to superstores were now losing the remaining shops to Amazon and similar services, so older folks who are either not comfortable with (or even capable of) net shopping or prefer the human touch now had few places to shop, and in particular fresh vegetables were difficult to come by.

I’m sure that I could save about 20 minutes a day by doing net shopping, but I still don’t trust the quality of fresh vegetables that one might get, and I like the physical experience of browsing the salad and side dish corner to see what looks nice or is on discount each day.

As for Amazon Prime Video (or NetFlix, etc), I just don’t have any urge to watch!

Here’s Danbo, Amazon Japan’s mascot character, looking rather sad:

Danbo Was Once Lost but He Has Now Seen The Light
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Hikikomori, zangyo and hentai surprisingly understood abroad

I don’t quite believe this goo Ranking of Japanese words that people are surprised to learn are understood overseas; of course, I have no reason to dispute the results, but as this style of survey is picking a selection from a list of words, I cannot really understand why the survey compiler picked zangyo, overtime as a representative word. I’ve done a quick search of the BBC and New York Times, and while both have stories mentioning hikikomori and hentai, zangyo draws a blank.

I’m surprised at Doraemon and Sailor Moon featuring so high on the list too, as I am aware from watching Japanese television that these cartoons and any others are rather popular all over the world.

I just searched for hikikomori on Flickr, and on the first page was two pictures of bugs in rice. So, instead I took the first usable photo for otaku, which turned out to be an instance of too niche a Japanese word to be understood widely abroad, the ita-sha, the sort of car no-one other than an otaku would be seen dead in.

ITA-Sya. (OTAKU car)
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

What you never wanted to know about female otaku

This survey starts off entertaining, but towards the end it gets a bit odd, perhaps due to my poor translation of some of the terms… I hope that doesn’t spoil this look at what things Japanese people didn’t want to learn about female otaku.

Note that the “favourite” here could be either a real person like a comic artist, or a 2D character from a favourite author.

Number 2 might be a disappointment to many of my readers! Number 6 was the one for me that I didn’t want to know.

These three probably qualify as female otaku, for their own particular brand of fashion:

Lolita Goth
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments

Next entries »