75% of Japanese still listen to the radio

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Do you know about IP simulcast radio?? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, looked at IP simulcast radio. If you’re not sure what that is, join the slim majority of Japanese who don’t know either.

Demographics

Between the 25th and 27th of July 2011 1,086 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.9% of the sample were male, 16.8% in their teens, 18.2% in their twenties, 21.1% in their thirties, 16.2% in their forties, 15.6% in their fifties, and 12.2% aged sixty or older.

IP simulcast radio is simultaneously broadcasting radio over the airwaves and the internet. The BBC don’t call it anything special with just a “Listen Live” label, but the main Japanese rebroadcaster/aggregator, radiko.jp (note it checks your IP address to give you your local stations only, and only for Tokyo and Osaka areas) has “IP simulcast radio” as part of its logo.

Talking of the area lock of radiko, after the earthquake they removed the area block so everyone could listen. And then reintroduced the block on the first of April.

Finally, NHK will start simulcasting their Radio 1 and Radio 2 channels from next month.
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Slim majority listen to the radio in Japan

Are you interested in listening to internet radio on a PC, smartphone, etc? graph of japanese statisticsI have tried a few times listening to the radio in Japan, but I have never found it a rewarding experience. However, this recent survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, into this topic found that just overhalf the population were listeners.

Demographics

Between the 23rd and 26th of February 2011 1,097 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.0% in their teens, 18.3% in their twenties, 21.5% in their thirties, 16.5% in their forties, 15.7% in their fifties, and 11.9% aged sixty or older.

I’ve not tried internet radio; I left the UK just before it really took off, so never got into the habit of listening to it. Back at home I always woke up to serious breakfast news radio (I never really enjoyed music radio), but now nothing more than an alarm clock gets me up in the morning, and over breakfast the television is easier.
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