How present-day Japanese view New Year

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Just in time for the New Year, here is a survey from @nifty into New Year, looking at a few aspects of how Japanese really pass the New Year, rather than the usual rather fanciful reporting one often sees around these holiday.

We buy in most of ours, but I find most of it rather bland and uninteresting. I could just eat black beans and egg rolls all holidays, but unfortunately I have to endure bland and often cold foods for about a week or more.

Here’s some home-made Osechi that is rather heavy on the vegetable side, not that that is a problem:

Mimi's osechi
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New Year postcards that annoy

Happy New Year of the Sheep to all my readers! Let’s kick off with a look at features of New Year postcards that annoy people.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where on the 19th of December 2014 500 female members of their monitor group (note: an all-female sample seems odd here and might be a mistake) completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were given.

This year, the post office annoyed me rather than people’s cards, as we moved and either almost everyone missed the last posting date or the post office was just slow to redirect, but we got just six cards on New Year’s Day instead of the usual 20 or 30.

I haven’t a clue why number two would annoy people! Is it some sort of disliked boasting? I’m sure every year I get one or two that feature children only, although pets only (especially dogs!) would annoy me.

Here is a New Year sheep (Flickr says it was taken on January 1st 2010), with an octopus, for no particular reason:


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What people want to take time and effort to enjoy this New Year

This will be the last survey of this year, from goo Ranking and looking at what enjoyable but time-consuming task people want to do.

Demographics

The survey was conducted during the 31st of October and the 1st of November 2013, and 1,060 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

Happy New Year of the Horse to all my readers! Above is a typical scene from the Japanese concept of First Footing, a midnight visit to a temple.
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How wives’ dissatisfactions with their husbands cause New Year rows

Just in time for the New Year, and perhaps as an alert to my male readers on how to avoid getting into their wife’s bad books, goo Ranking published a list of dissatisfactions with one’s husband that causes arguments to break out over New Year.

Demographics

The survey was conducted during the 31st of October and the 1st of November 2013, and 1,060 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample. I would guess that only married women answered the survey, although the wording of the Japanese answers suggests that unmarried women could imagine which answers might apply to them in the future or to other couples, or even their parents.

This rather unappetising-looking fish is actually rather auspicious; me failing to avoid turning up my nose at some of the traditional Japanese New Year offering is perhaps the most common reason previously for arguments!

So far this year end I don’t think I’ve committed any of these flaws, although I am currently skating on thin ice regarding my procrastination of tidying up the garden!
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A tedious New Year for all my readers!

No, that’s not a comment on this blog’s contents (I hope), but instead the theme of a goo Ranking survey into when one feels it tedious spending the New Year holiday at the family home.

Demographics

Between the 5th and 7th of November 2012 1,049 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 58.8% of the sample were female, 10.2% in their teens, 14.6% in their twenties, 27.5% in their thirties, 25.1% in their forties, 11.0% in their fifties, and 11.7% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

Here’s what I find tedious about Japanese New Year, standing in queues like these for shrines and temples.

New Year

Living so far away from home and having few opportunities to visit, there is little I feel is tedious regarding spending the Christmas and New Year holiday there, especially as my parents tend to spoil me, so I can lie in as long as I like but there is always food waiting, washing gets done without my intervention, etc. Perhaps only number 15 gets tedious.

On the other hand, regarding number 13 there was something my father said about 13 Christmases ago that I think I remember as being tedious at the time, but it kicked off a chain of events that resulted in me getting married. And I still haven’t forgiven the bugger yet. (No no, darling, that was a joke!)
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SNS New Year cards

Have you ever used mixi's New Year postcard intermediary service? graph of japanese statisticsWith the last posting day before New Year getting ever closer, this survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, into New Year postcards is a reminder to us all to get ours finished.

Demographics

Between the 29th of November and the 1st of December 2011 1,083 members of the goo Research online monitor panel completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.9% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 18.3% in their twenties, 21.4% in their thirties, 16.2% in their forties, 15.7% in their fifties, and 11.9% aged sixty or older.

I haven’t actually got round to even ordering my New Year postcards yet, and as I’ve been at our work Christmas end of year party tonight I’m in no fit state, so that’s another day closer to the deadline… Note, I’ve prepared this post ahead of time, so any mistakes are just the usual me, not the beer’s fault!
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When you start feeling the New Year coming

Despite the New Year having already gone – Happy New Year to all my readers – let’s do a post on a survey from goo Ranking looking at when people feel the New Year is approaching.

Demographics

Between the 19th and 22nd of November 2010 1,171 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.2% of the sample were female, 11.3% in their teens, 19.1% in their twenties, 29.0% in their thirties, 23.4% in their forties, 9.6% in their fifties, and 7.6% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

To liven up today’s survey, I’ll embed a few pictures and videos of the events. I feel it getting near when it comes time to prepare New Year postcards, which we usually start around the end of November.
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Busiest people at a Japanese New Year

A happy New Year to you all, with a look at what is the busiest profession over the New Year, a survey from goo Ranking, of course.

Demographics

Between the 19th and 22nd of November 2010 1,171 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.2% of the sample were female, 11.3% in their teens, 19.1% in their twenties, 29.0% in their thirties, 23.4% in their forties, 9.6% in their fifties, and 7.6% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I’d say 17=, a reporter, is the easiest job over the New Year – if it’s hard news, they can start writing year-end wrap-ups ahead of times; if it’s the latest news, on television at least 90% of it is interviews with people leaving or coming back at airports, bullet train stations, etc, reports of enormous car jams at all the usual motorway locations, and a few bits of stock footage of preparations or the aftermath of New Year at the popular temples. I’m sure they could even run last year’s columns and nobody would notice!

All photos from flickr – click on them to see them in full detail – apologies for some not being terribly seasonal, but it was hard enough to find the right subjects, let alone the locations.
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Slowing down for the holiday period

Although it’s not my holidays until next Wednesday, many of my readers seem to have already gone on holiday, so I’ll be cutting down my posting frequency, working on other projects (there’s two Facebook things I must do) and posting more goo Ranking nonsense for the next two weeks.

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2010 (Heisei 22) New Year Postcard Nengajo lottery results

New Year Postcard lottery 2010 winning stampsThe winners of the 2010 New Year Postcard lottery for the Year of the Tiger have been announced, and the winning numbers and prizes are as follows. The number to check is the six digit number at the bottom right of the card. Note that some cards do not actually have numbers, which means they are not eligible…

First prize: 975424

Choose any one from a 32 inch Sharp Aquos LCD televison, a JTB holiday, either three nights in Hawaii or Hong Kong, 2 nights in Korea, or one night in one of 58 domestic hot springs resorts, Toshiba dynabook EX notebook plus Casio EXILIM EX-Z450GD digital camera plus Canon PIXUS MP560 printer, Canon iVIS HF21 video camera, or 200,000 yen’s worth of office furniture from an ASKUL catalogue.

Second prize: 630838, 446722, or 259668

Choose any one from a Nintendo Wii plus Wii Sports Resort, Canon XY DIGITAL 220 IS digital camera, Toshia portable DVD player SD-P73DTW, Sharp Plamsa Cluster air purifier KC-Y45-W, or 30 kilogrammes of rice.

Third prize: last four digits 0977

Choose any one food item from 38 different ones on offer, from a tea blend for the Imperial Hotel to canned crab soup.

Fourth prize: last two digits 52 or 00

Otoshidama stamp set – a fifty yen and an eighty yen stamp, pictured above.

C Gumi Special prize: 27520

50,000 yen’s worth of JTB holiday vouchers. The “C Gumi” is apparently something to do with carbon offest New Year Postcards.

If you have matched any of these, go to your nearest post office before the 26th of July 2010 and either collect the stamps while you wait, or apply for any of the bigger prizes. The full prize line-up can be seen here. I’ve just checked mine and I’ve won two sheets of the stamps above.

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