Japanese men in the kitchen: part 2 of 2

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I want people to praise my cooking graph of japanese statisticsMacromill Research recently took a look at the subject of men and cooking.

Demographics

Between the 28th and 30th of October 2011 516 male members of the Macromill monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 25% of the sample were in their twenties, 25% in their thirties, 25% in their forties, and 25% in their fifties. In addition, 312 female members were also interviewed, also with 25% in each of the age brackets.

I actually got asked to do the cooking on Sunday evening as my wife had a sore hand, but she decided to soldier on and all I ended up doing was peeling the spuds and a turnip…
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Japanese men in the kitchen: part 1 of 2

Cooking is woman's work graph of japanese statisticsMacromill Research recently took a look at the subject of men and cooking.

Demographics

Between the 28th and 30th of October 2011 516 male members of the Macromill monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 25% of the sample were in their twenties, 25% in their thirties, 25% in their forties, and 25% in their fifties. In addition, 312 female members were also interviewed, also with 25% in each of the age brackets.

I very rarely cook, although I do often help out in the kitchen. When I do cook, my speciality is quiche; everything else turns out a bit ordinary, and I am teribly slow. On the other hand, I do love baking, although I don’t do that as much as I would like. I bought some scone mix at the weekend, so sometime round about Christmas I’ll whip up a few.
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Three in five quitters still smoke-free after a month

When do you most want to smoke? graph of japanese statisticsWith the rise in cigarette prices of approximately 100 yen per pack of twenty, adding roughly a third onto the price of the average brand, many smokers took this as an opportunity to quit. This recent survey from Macromill Research doesn’t look at what percentage quit, but instead focuses on how the quitters are coping.

Demographics

Over the 1st and 2nd of November 2010 500 members of the Macromill monitor group who had resolved to stop smoking following the tobacco price rise in October completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 68.4% were male, 12.8% in their twenties, 33.2% in their thirties, 31.8% in their forties, and 22.2% aged fifty or older.

I suppose it’s a good sign that at least some people are quitting, although looking at Q1 and from tales from smokers, relapses can happen at unexpected times, so after a month free from smoking one cannot really say one has kicked the habit. Furthermore, with the end of year party season coming up, thus placing the quitters around people smoking and around drink, the second and third greatest temptations according to Q3SQ1, the risk of relapse will be pretty high, I fear.
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Sport participation in Japan

How important to you is watching or playing sports? graph of japanese statisticsMacromill Research recently took a look at sports marketing.

Demographics

Between the 3rd and 5th of September 2010 2,000 members of the Maromill monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female in each age band, with 20.0% aged between 15 and 29 years old, 20.0% in their thirties, 20.0% in their forties, 20.0% in their fifties, and 20.0% in their sixties.

In Q9 Macromill were having a quick look at a subject I covered earlier, Yama Girls, but they also found that there really didn’t seem to be much of a movement there.
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Japanese iPad early adopters mostly satisfied

For how long per day do you use your iPad? graph of japanese statisticsMacromill Research recently conducted a detailed survey into the opinions of recent iPad purchasers, and found a mostly positive set of reactions.

Demographics

On the 14th and 15th of June 2010 300 iPad users from the Macromill monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 88.7% of the sample were male, 4.7% in their teens, 25.7% in their twenties, 36.0% in their thirties, 19.7% in their forties, and 14.0% aged fifty or older. 51.3% were married, 55.7% were regular company employees, 12.3% students, and all other occupation types were under 7%. A couple of other significant demographics are in tables D1 and D2 below.

The iPad was released on May 28th in Japan, so most people would have had their iPad for less than three weeks. It would be interesting to see the survey results from the same questions in three months time.

It’s curious that in Q7 that a majority are dissatified with the battery life, whereas a search of Google reports that most people are getting more than the advertised 10 hours out of it. Is it just because it is new and people are doing battery-heavy tasks like playing games, downloading stuff and watching movies, or have people got Nintendo DS Lite-like expectations?
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Japanese wives in the kitchen: part 2 of 2

I'm happy even if my husband's cooking is disgusting. Do you agree? graph of japanese statisticsA recent very detailed survey from Macromill Research Inc looked at the matter of cooking and married couples’ relationships

Demographics

Between the 2nd and 4th of April 2010 516 married female members of the Macromill monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 25.0% of the sample were in their twenties, 25.0% in their thirties, 25.0% in their forties, and 25.0% aged fifty or older.

My wife would like me to cook occasionally, perhaps once a month, but due to a combination of my only decent dish being a flan or quiche, we neve quite having the right ingredients in, and my general slow speed in the kitchen, I haven’t actually cooked for years! However, I always help in the kitchen, from making the tea to tidying up and washing the dishes.
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Japanese wives in the kitchen: part 1 of 2

How good are you at cooking? graph of japanese statisticsA recent very detailed survey from Macromill Research Inc looked at the matter of cooking and married couples’ relationships

Demographics

Between the 2nd and 4th of April 2010 516 married female members of the Macromill monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 25.0% of the sample were in their twenties, 25.0% in their thirties, 25.0% in their forties, and 25.0% aged fifty or older.

You’ll note in the above results that there isn’t a separate entry for the wife working and a househusband. Whether there were no such couples, they were filtered out, or just forgotton about, I do not know.

My wife cooks about five or six days a week – at the weekends we’ll have one evening meal out, and during the week there’s occasionally times when she goes to the cinema, etc, and we meet somewhere to eat out. At home we almost always eat together – she’ll eat before me if I’m going to be later than about 7:30, but fortunately that rarely happens.
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Coming of Age in 2010 in Japan: part 2 of 2

To what degree do you desire to be active internationally? graph of japanese statistics[part 1][part 2]

Macromill published their annual survey on new adults, looking at how the latest batch of twenty year olds look at themselves and their future

Demographics

Over the 21st and 22nd of December 2009 516 members of the Macromill monitor group who have recently or will soon be turning twenty thus eligible to attend a Coming of Age ceremony this weekend completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female.

The stereotypes of the herbivore boy and the carnivore girl make an appearance towards the end of this survey! In Q11, considering that most of the respondents are probably university students, under 20% being active in the pursuit of the opposite sex, especially given the commonly-held view that Japanese universities are not exactly the most taxing of institutions study-wise, does seem a rather low figure to me!
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Coming of Age in 2010 in Japan: part 1 of 2

How do you see the future of Japan? graph of japanese statistics[part 1][part 2]

Macromill published their annual survey on new adults, looking at how the latest batch of twenty year olds look at themselves and their future

Demographics

Over the 21st and 22nd of December 2009 516 members of the Macromill monitor group who have recently or will soon be turning twenty thus eligible to attend a Coming of Age ceremony this weekend completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female.

Most foreigners in Japan are more interested in photographing the kimono on display, not that I can blame them for that, but I think that looking past the stereotypes of partying with Mickey Mouse and drunken neds starting fights at the ceremonies is much more intellectually interesting and much less predictable than the usual coverage.
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2009 top news stories in Japan

It’s getting towards the end of the year, so let’s have a look back at the top news and items from 2009 in this survey from Marcomill Inc.

Demographics

Over the 4th and 5th of December 2009 1,000 members of the Macromill monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sexes were split exactly 50:50, and 25.0% were in their twenties, 25.0% in their thirties, 25.0% in their forties, and 25.0% between 50 and 69 years old.

My top news would be the DPJ’s victory, the arrest of Ichihashi, and the press reaction to the Noriko Sakai drugs bust. Top topical items would be the iPhone 3GS (I’m surprised it didn’t make it), the 1,000 yen toll road traffic jams, and the Odaiba Gundam. What’s yours?
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