The true national video game series of Japan

goo Ranking recently took a look at what its users thought was the true national video game series of Japan.

Nintendo is especially strong here, but since their various machines are more family-oriented I’m not really surprised. However, I’ve never actually played anything on a Nintendo, so I can’t really say how much I agree or disagree with the ranking. The first series I’ve played anything of is Final Fantasy, and I don’t think there’s any game there I’ve played more than one of the series!

I’ve tried to use the official English translations of titles, but there’s a few I may have missed, so please let me know of any errors.

Number 7, Nobunaga’s Ambition, is a title I’ve never heard of, but it looks like a complex strategy game based on Japan’s civil war period. Here’s an English-language review of the recent English-language release in the series:


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Women and mobile games: part 3 of 3


This rather huge survey from Kurashi How Labs looked at women and smartphone games.

This final part found a small number of people buying in-game stuff, but even there most just used pocket money. I’ve never paid real money, but my wife borrows all the money I collect from Google Rewards and recently Google Pay cash back to spend on clothes for some dress-up game.

Talking about paying for dress-up games, here’s a screen shot from the grand-daddy of them all, Second Life, featuring two cats sitting in a Japanese style toilet:

Les japonais elegantes 14
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Women and mobile games: part 2 of 3

This rather huge survey from Kurashi How Labs looked at women and smartphone games.

My current game has a handy display of how many days you’ve logged in as you log in, so I can tell you that I’ve been playing for 199 days. The last game I was addicted to, Two Dots, I quit after about a year as I’d basically beaten the game; I’d got three stars on every single level, and there was no new content on the horizon, so I quit.

I’ve seen this game advertised on the monitors in the train, but you probably get put on a list if you download it:


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Women and mobile games: part 1 of 3


This rather huge survey from Kurashi How Labs looked at women and smartphone games and will be published over three days this week.

I’m not a woman, but I’ve currently got just one game on my phone
that I’m hopelessly addicted to! I’m not telling you how long I waste every day on it, but most of the play time is either at home or on the train to and from the office.
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Exclusives main reason for purchasing a Nintendo DS

The seventh regular survey into consumer games machines by goo Research and reported on by japan.internet.com also revealed that Nintendo’s machines are still the most popular in Japan.

Demographics

Between the 6th and 8th of January 2011 1,093 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 18.3% in their twenties, 21.4% in their thirties, 16/3% in their forties, and 27.5% aged fifty or older.

As there’s nothing I can graph in this survey, instead here’s the first match on YouTube for Nintendo:

The survey also noted that in the US the various Nintendo DSs had sold about 47 million, and the Wii around 34 million.

I’ve not seen the Nintendo 3DS in real life, but the Sharp LYNX mobile phone uses similar technology to do its 3D, and it does work rather well, although I’m not sure how trying to use 3D in a moving train will be, although I suspect that at least I would get motion sickness from it; One Seg television is enough eye (and stomach) strain for me.
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Game series worth a full 3D remake

goo Ranking this week looked at a survey entitled which game series would people like to play on a big screen 3D television, which implies that the game series chosen get remade for 3D.

Demographics

Over the 21st and 22nd of September 2010 1,072 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 68.2% of the sample were female, 10.4% in their teens, 18.0% in their twenties, 29.8% in their thirties, 26.2% in their forties, 8.7% in their fifties, and 7.0% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

Not placing anywhere on the list is the Doom series – I’d be interested in seeing a 3D remake of at least Doom 1, preferably with the original sprite-based 3D. The source code is out there, so I’m sure some enterprising soul will remake it (if they haven’t already) for a 3D-supporting device.

And just in case you are wondering what “Loveplus” is, perhaps this will explain:


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Xbox360 played less than Super Famicons, N64s and PS1s

The sixth regular survey into consumer games machines by goo Research and reported on by japan.internet.com also revealed that almost all portable games machine users used them at home.

Demographics

Over the 16th and 17th of September 2010 1,099 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.6% of the sample were male, 16.4% in their teens, 18.7% in their twenties, 21.7% in their thirties, 15.8% in their forties, and 15.7% in their fifties, and 11.7% aged sixty or older.

I read today about Panasonic’s re-entry into the games market through a subsiduary names Panasonic Cloud Entertainment, or PCENT for short (read as P-CENT?) with the too-ugly-to-be-retro The Jungle.

Note that Panasonic have never actually been away from the games market, as they’ve done a lot of system software for all the recent Nintendo devices, but PCENT seem to have no relation to the Nintendo-related work.

Note that the survey for some reason reported the first two sets of data as percentages but the third as raw numbers.
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PlayStation 3 played less than Nintendo 64

How often do you visit game centres? graph of japanese statisticsI’ve not been to an arcade myself for ages, nor have I really had the time (or quite frankly, the inclination) to play any games recently. To see what the Japanese are doing, MyVoice took their second look at game usage, although I’m not sure when the first look took place!

Demographics

Over the first five days of May 2008 14,373 members of the MyVoice internet community successfully completed a private on-line questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 2% in their teens, 15% in their twenties, 37% in their thirties, 29% in their forties, and 17% in their fifties.

The last two times we were in arcades (or game centres, as they are known in Japan), we spent all our cash on the UFO Catchers with nothing to show. That falls under the category of “prize games” in Q6, and before I next go I’ll be sure to study this video on how to win at them!
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Online gaming in Japan

About how often do you play online games? graph of japanese statisticsOne online game I see heavily advertised in Japan is a free online RPG Maple Story, although I’ve never actually played it myself, and I take no responsibility from any addiction caused by clicking through that link! To see what the average Japanese person plays at online, MyVoice performed a survey on online games.

Demographics

Over the first five days of February 2008 15,447 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 54% of the sample was female, 2% in their teens, 16% in their twenties, 37% in their thirties, 28% in their forties, and 17% in their fifties.

I used to play online games, starting with the sadly departed Meridian 59, then beta testing Ultima Online, Everquest as both a beta and a paid-for player, then finally Asheron’s Call for quite a bit until I found out that being an anti-social git meant I didn’t get very far ahead. I still miss Meridian 59, as it was small enough to form real friendships, in fact even leading to a real-life meeting with a bunch of other people once. I don’t think I’d ever do that again as there seems to be far too many weirdos about these days, or maybe it’s just I’m a bit older and less naive.
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Granny got game?

How often do you use your game machine? graph of japanese statisticsRound about the time of the release of the Nintendo DS there was a lot of buzz about the new demographics they were reaching, in particular how the range of brain training software was selling well in the older market segment. To see what the situation is these says, goo Research, in conjuction with AllAbout Japan, surveyed the “Mrs” demographic about their use of digital items and game machines.

Demographics

Over the 17th and 18th of December 2007 1,076 members of the goo Research online monitor panel completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The “Mrs” demographic was married women between the ages of 50 and 69, with 33.9% aged between 50 and 54, 33.9% between 55 and 59, and 32.2% in their sixties.

I remember once trying to tempt my mother into gaming with The Hobbit on the Sinclair Spectrum, but I can’t say it was much of a success at all. However, the brain training games would be fun for her, perhaps, or even if they weren’t I could play them instead…
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