Coping with English-speaking tourists

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About how much do you think you understand when foreign tourists engage you in English conversation? graph of japanese statisticsThe online English conversation lesson site hanaso recently released a survey into dealing with foreign tourists in English.

Demographics

Over the 29th and 30th of August 2013 437 people who had had the experience of being engaged in English conversation by a foreign visitor to Japan. The sample was of both sexes and between the ages of 20 and 59, but no further information was offered. Judging by other surveys on their site, I think that the sample was taken from site users.

Note that since (I presume) the sample comes from English language learners, I would guess that they are more proactive and positive in their English and tourist views, therefore it would be difficult to extrapolate to the general population. However, since I occasionally hear English conversation teachers complaining about the backward and insular views of their students, I feel the results here indicate that these opinions may be the result of confirmation bias rather than actually representative.
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Japan last for police trust and legitimacy

Central Research Services Inc recently published a survey looking at victims of crime, etc in Japan, and comparing it with similar surveys from Europe.

Demographics

In 2011 2,000 people over the age of 15 were randomly selected from resident registers to take part in the survey. At the end of May all bar those from two sampling points in Tohoku that were affected by the earthquake were interviewed face-to-face, and the remaining people were interviewed at the end of July. In total 1,251 responded to the questionnaire, with 50.5% of the sample female and 49.5% male. The age breakdown was not given.

These are really very surprising figures for me! I didn’t expect Japan to be so low on police legitimacy, for one thing. Recently there has been a spate of reports of police uselessness when responding to crimes, miscarriages of justice, etc which would have influenced public distrust of the overall criminal justice system, but questions on direct interactions with the system would suggest that even the average bobby on the beat is a bit bent.

Note that the European data was taken from European Social Survey, 2009, “Trust in Justice: European Social Survey”.
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When Japanese feel they’re back home from overseas

Continuing the foreign holiday theme, this time goo Ranking looked at when Japanese feel they are back home after overseas travel. The actual title contains one of these Japanese words that I always find difficult to translate; it’s the feeling of being able to relax after something stressful or challenging, the sigh after the first mouthful of cold beer that lets out all the stress of a hard day’s work, for instance. If any of my readers wish to chip in with a good translation for ?????, please comment!

Demographics

Over the 6th and 7th of June 2011 1,148 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.6% of the sample were male, 12.1% in their teens, 16.9% in their twenties, 28.0% in their thirties, 25.4% in their forties, 9.7% in their fifties, and 7.9% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

My feeling of being back home is going to Starbucks in Kansai Airport arrivals lounge; it’s a combination of trying to make myself understood in Japanese through a faceful of stubble and hangover-enhanced jetlag, the staff trying their hardest with English, and when it comes to pay, my triumphant I’m-not-just-another-bloody-tourist moment as I wave my Kabibara-san-encased electronic cash and declare “PiTaPa onegaishimasu!”

STARBUCKS
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Email, maps and travel guides most wanted on foreign trips

Since it’s just the end of the Japan summer holiday season, let’s have a look at this timely survey from goo Ranking into what uses Japanese would like to make of their mobile phones overseas.

Demographics

Over the 6th and 7th of June 2011 1,148 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.6% of the sample were male, 12.1% in their teens, 16.9% in their twenties, 28.0% in their thirties, 25.4% in their forties, 9.7% in their fifties, and 7.9% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

The one time I used my mobile phone overseas all I used was SMS as proper email and all other uses involving data packets are horrendously expensive; one SMS in itself was 100 yen, and although email data packets would be cheaper for the equivalent 140 SMS characters, email would encourage my wife to start pasting in decomail icons or attaching photos…

Talking of photos, searching Flickr gives me absolutely nothing useful, sorry…
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