Koizumi’s legacy is Yasukuni rather than reforms?

goo Ranking released the results of their latest ranking questionnaire, conducted over two days towards the end of August. An unspecified number of goo users replied to the question of what is your lasting impression of the Junichiro Koizumi premiership.

This departs from the usual fluff of these ranking surveys, but I cannot give any guarantee about how accurately the figures reflect true public opinion. As always, the score for each option is the percentage of the votes for the top answer. I’m impressed by Jun-chan’s Elvis impressions making ninth on the list, but disappointed that him dancing with his doppelganger Richard Gere didn’t get anywhere!

Additionally, I suspect that anything directly related to him backing Horiemon’s election campaigning was disallowed due to the ongoing court case.
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Japan’s Diet should diet

According to a short article found on the Yomiuri Shimbun’s web site, they performed a face-to-face interview-based opinion poll in the middle of November to discover people’s attitude towards national politicians and politics. I wonder how much of the negative attitudes towards politicians was fired by the election of Taizo Read more…

Election post mortem

Finally what I have been searching for, a bit late, but nonetheless, it’s the only survey I could find on the topic. DIMSDRIVE performed a public opinion poll on the two days right after the recent general election, questioning 3,598 people from all around the country in an internet-based survey. Read more…

Post-election humbug

Well, we’ve had the ultimate test of public opinion (more analysis of the numbers later) and Koizumi led the LDP and New Komeito alliance to win over two-thirds of the seats in the new lower house, knocking out half of the people kicked out of the party for opposing the Read more…

Exit poll results

Looking at reports of the exit polls we can begin to build up a picture of what really happened at the ballot boxes. The main unknowns in the run-up to the election were the undecided and the unaffiliated voters, about 40% and 45% (although of course there would be a Read more…