Archive for Lifestyle

Western toilet style vastly preferred

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This survey into toilets is rather interesting, and a bit surprising that nearly half the Japanese men have at least occasionally felt the urge to go whilst travelling to work.

One interesting result from the stand or sit debate is that Kyushu men, who have the stereotype of being very masculine and uncompromising, were to type here, with over 50% making a stand for a man’s right to stand.

I’m a bit funny when it comes to public toilets; I’ll only use department store ones if I need a poo, but I can very easily be turned off by simple things like some cling-ons left on the bowl or just a funny smell, and no toilet seat cover makes me feel very uncomfortable for some weird reason!

Here’s an advert for getting caught short in the train – geri-portation is a terrible pun on geri, the runs, and teleportation:


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Three in four Japanese like okonomiyaki and takoyaki

The two soul foods of the west of Japan are okonomiyaki, a sort-of savoury pancake, and takoyaki, a ball of dough with octopus testicles inside. This survey from @nifty looked at what the whole country thinks of okonomiyaki and takoyaki.

I love okonomiyaki; it’s great on a hot summer’s evening in front of blazing hot plate with an ice-cold beer or three. My first few years in Japan I ate it at least twice a week at a local shop, as it was one of the few easy vegetarian meals even with little language, as they cook everything right in front of you.

I’ve never had takoyaki, however. It always smells too strong for me, and the dancing fish flakes look quite unappetising!

Okonomiyaki: mayo and ginger top it off -- ready to eat!
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Pak chi (cilantro) disliked by almost half the Japanese

This survey from @nifty looked at Chinese and other Asian dishes.

I’ve not tried much Chinese food in Japan, but it does have the image to me of being like the cheap carry-outs I remember from Scotland. I’ve not tried much Korean either, but I’ve at least had a reasonable number of the South-East Asian dishes.

There’s a Bamiyan Chinese restaurant just one minute walk from my house, but I won’t go in: it’s half smoking with very little separation, and anyway, I have some degree of misophonia, with noodle slurping being my biggest pet hate (excessive plastic bag rustling in the train is another), so I couldn’t possibly enjoy any food.

I rather like pak chi; I think the first time I encountered it was a Vietnamese restaurant in Shinjuku, and since I’ve also had pak chi crisps (nice!) and pak chi lemonade, which was interesting.

Here’s some random gyoza:

Nomenclature.
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Japanese kids’ loved and hated fruit and veg

Today’s survey was a look at children’s liked and disliked fruit and vegetables.

My most hated vegetable as a child, Brussels sprouts, are very much a rarity here in Japan, so I suspect not many children have tasted one, let alone have an opinion on them. I think the most interesting result here is how few children actually have disliked vegetables.

When Inside Out (or Inside Head as it was called here) came out in Japan, a scene featuring broccoli was changed to green peppers, because as you can see below, just one percent of Japanese children admit to green pepper love, versus 18% for broccoli.

Here’s some loved and hated strawberries:

Strawberry People ClubMed Kabira Press Tour
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Japanese and physical newspaper consumption

Unlike many other countries, Japan’s physical newspaper market is generally healthy, as far as I am aware, and this survey from @nifty into newspapers appears to back up my opinions.

Note that some of the figures have one decimal place and some have none; this is because some figures were published to one decimal place, but others I had to estimate off a graph.

I didn’t know half of these uses in Q6! Here is a random cat helping his owner to read the newspaper:

うめ
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Worries about Buddhist services

A bit of a curious topic here, a look at worries about Buddhist services, conducted by the graveyard intermediary service, Ohaka no Hikkoshi or Graveyard Moving Service, as one of their services includes moving interred ashes from one location to another.
Having just recently used Buddhist funeral and grave services, fortunately my denomination has a very smooth funeral service, and since my wife’s family has certain connections, we got various free upgrades. I suppose the only worry is the home altar butsudan, as most of them seem to be made of the cheapest veneered chipboard, but priced as if they are chiselled out of the finest virgin ebony.

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Nine in ten Japanese have drunk local wine, fruitiness main draw

Have you ever drunk Japanese wine? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey from the brewer Kirin and their subsiduary the wine maker Mercian looked at Japanese wine consumption.

Before reading this survey, I was under the impression that most Japanese wine was made on an industrial scale with imported grapes, and that even Mercian was one of these fake wines, and any local wines was very niche and difficult to get hold of. I’ve now had my interest piqued, so I’ll maybe hunt some out. However, the only wine I drink is Saizeriya’s 100 yen gut-rot special (interestingly, they are the largest importer of Italian wine, it seems!) and whatever wine ends up on the all-you-can-drink menu at work booze-ups.

Here’s a random bottle of Japanese wine:

タケダワイナリーのサンスフル
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Old folk, incontinence, and pet dogs

In my quest to find novel topics to present, I give you this survey from MyNavi News into old folks’ worries about incontinence, and pet dogs. Incontinent doggies is a topic for another survey… Note that I use “pet” as that what was in the survey, but it seems to have been dog owners only.

You might remember the news from a couple of years back when it was announced that adult nappies outsold children’s ones for the first time. This survey, though, ignores that matter and focuses on dogs.

The results for non-dog owners in Q7 seems overly pessimistic, although the answers might, I hope, have been cherry-picked to show only categories that has a big positive dog-owning effect.

Here’s a dog in a nappy, but from Hong Kong, it would seem.

baby dog
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One in seven over-sixty Japanese have prepared for their death

Do you know the term 'shuukatsu'? graph of japanese statisticsA word that came into fashion about five or six years ago is 終活, shuukatsu, an abbreviation of the phrase “Activities for one’s end of life”, basically getting one’s finances, will, paperwork, funeral plan, etc all in order while one is still able, so as not to be too much bother for one’s relatives after kicking the bucket. This survey from @nifty looked at this subject, shuukatsu, end of life preparations.

I’ve got my grave prepared – it’s a family plot out in the wilds of Shiga prefecture for myself, my wife, and her parents. Since Japanese funerals are quite expensive, my wishes would be to get everything over and done with with the minimal of fuss and expense. I’ve still got a tonne of paperwork from the UK to sort out though…

At least my place looks prettier than here:

墓地明石天文台よりP9160008.jpg
By 白蛇の騎士白蛇の騎士, GFDL, Link

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Almost two in three Japanese dissatisfied with their sleep

How satisfied are you with your sleep? graph of japanese statistics

IDC Otsuka furniture chain recently released the results of a survey they conducted last year into sleep, in apparently an effort to sell some mattresses, given that the second half of the press release was an advertisement for some mattresses.

I’m totally dissatisfied with my sleep; the sleep itself is sound enough, but far too short. If you count sleeping on the train, and on the sofa at home, I think I just manage five hours…

In Japan chronic sleep deprivation starts from an early age:

Wake Up
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