Archive for Lifestyle

One in four Japanese is totally lacking in wisdom… teeth

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This short but interesting survey by Katte2Q into dentists and teeth revealed a few interesting numbers regarding Japanese teeth.

The Japanese for wisdom teeth is 親知らず, oyashirazu, or literally “without parents’ knowing”, which might suggest to the casual reader that it has something to do with one’s parents not noticing their adult child’s back teeth appearing, unlike with baby teeth and the main adult teeth. However, I have seen some sites that explain this further as meaning one’s parents tended to be dead before the teeth appeared…

I’ve not had mine removed, but my dentists have never mentioned anything about them, although I’ve got a slight (false?) memory of seeing an X-Ray with the bottom ones horizonal rather than vertical. Next check-up I’ll have to remember to ask!

Here’s an interesting dentist’s sign:

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Guerilla downpours in Japan

In the last ten years or so it seems that sudden and difficult to forecast thunderstorms have increased; they have been named guerilla downpours, and this survey from Weather News looked at awareness of such storms.

The average guerilla storm will brew up in an hour or so, often going from bright daylight to night-like darkness and accompanied by a 5 to 10 degrees Celsius temperature drop, before dumping from about 50mm to over 100mm of rain in an hour.

Many Japanese, including my wife, seem over-anxious about lightning; I grew up where lightning was rare, then first experienced a serious electrical storm in France, which I watched with a beer in my hand from a hotel terrace, but now I’m not even allowed to look out the window…

Here’s some thunder and lightning everyone loves – Kaminari (thunder/lightning) Gate at Sensouji Temple in Asakusa. The large lantern guarded by the God of Lightning is a gift from Matsushita (now Panasonic) Electrical, and the very first product of the company was an adapter for light sockets that provided a plug along with the bulb, so might say the God of Lightning is guarding a gift from the God of Lighting.

Senso-ji_Temple-Kaminari-mon
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Majority of Japanese live with cockroaches

at home VOX recently had a look at that summer pest, cockroaches.

I hate the buggers myself, and my previous house was filled with them, and I suspect last summer one died somewhere behind the kitchen units and stunk the place out for a few months. I tend to run away on encountering them, and get my wife to do the business with a can of bug spray.

Here’s a selection of the various smoke bombs and other goods for ridding one’s house of cockroaches and other nasties:

Japan Insect Repellent
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Two in three vapers have decreased or quit tobacco

This survey from Donika, a company that has a finger in many pies, including Vape Online, which as the name suggests is an online shop for vape products, used this survey into the effect of using electronic tobacco on quitting smoking.

If you look at the figures for the respondents for each question they do not add up at all – I have no idea what they managed to get wrong, so please don’t pay too much attention to them.

Vaping is taking off in Japan, with most of the cigarette makers now releasing their own electronic tobacco devices; in fact, supply cannot keep up with demand with the latest model now sold out in every convenience store I visit. Note that specialised vaping devices don’t seem too popular.

An interesting thing is that I’ve only ever seen people vaping in smoking corners or around ash trays, which seems to sort of defeat one of the attractions of vaping.

Not even the fish are allowed to smoke at Tokyo Disney Sea:


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Japanese hate the beer gut from warm, bitter beer

As a follow-up from Sunday’s look at celebs pimping beer, I now present the rest of the survey into beer and beer-like drinks.

Note, happoshu is (as far as I am aware…) separately-produced alcohol mixed with beer flavours and fizz to get some sort of mock beer that tastes as bad as it sounds; the reason it sells is that it is lower tax and goes for about half the price. Third sector or new genre beer is brewed like beer, but instead of malts (which attracts a high tax), alternatives like potatos, peas, old socks, etc is used, and other magic goes in to remove sugars, purine (the stuff that gives you gout) and other nasties. Low sugar is good for avoiding morning mouth and it often tastes quite passable, and of course is pocket-friendly.

Here’s a bunch of random beer adverts, many in classic style:

Beer posters
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3 in 4 Japanese have a radio, 1 in 4 listen to it every day

The web site Katte2Q recently conducted a survey into radio listening habits.

I’ve not got a usable radio at home; the only thing with a receiver is in a box, but I suppose one can listen to net radio, but looking at the results here perhaps not all people were aware that their phones or PCs could do that.

Here’s quite an odd-looking vintage radio from Panasonic:

(Left) A Vintage Panasonic Toot-A-Loop AM Transistor Radio, Model R-72, Made in Japan and (Right) An Inexpensive Knock-Off, A Marksons' AM Wrist Radio Made in Hong Kong
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Price main blocker to purchasing an electric car

Full electric cars are getting a bit more practical these days, so this look at electric cars has interesting results; I’m especially surprised that that people are more curious about diesel engines than electrics or PHV, plug-in hybrid vehicles.

If trains weren’t so convenient, I might look at an electric car for daily use, but at the moment I am quite happy to rely on trains and forgo any form of personal transport.

I get to play with vehicles like this at work (don’t ask, but I’m not a 7/11 delivery driver!):

Toyota COMS single-person electric car
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One in five Japanese have recently used a launderette

With the rainy season starting, and given that drying clothes on one’s balcony is common, but washing machines with drier functions are relatively rare, this seems an ideal time to ask about usage of launderettes, in a survey conducted by Orange Page, a recipe magazine aimed at housewives in their thirties and forties.

I’ve not been to a launderette per se, but a couple of months ago in a hotel I used their laundry corner, where they had what looked like souped-up domestic Sharp machines that not just both washed and dried but also automatically added powder and softener.

Here’s a rather grim-looking launderette:

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Oral care much more of an issue these days

A popular stereotype of the Japanese is wonky teeth, which whilst there is a lot of truth to it, the awareness of good oral health has improved in not just my opinion, but in the opinion of the Orange Page’s monitor group, according to the results of this survey into oral care. This survey was conducted in conjunction with Philips

I’ve finally started using an inter-dental brush for bits of food that get stuck; I cannot floss as I don’t like touching my teeth with my hands, and indeed the dental hygienist flossing for me is more stressful than the drill! I used to use an electric brush, but I never really enjoyed it, and gave up once the battery stopped holding its recharge.

Here’s a polite Japanese toothbrush found probably in a hotel’s amenity set:

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Japanese men are breast men, but women love voice then hands

As a man, there are no surprises with the male answers to this survey into attractiveness, but the female answers look very unusual! Note that these questions were part of a longer survey, so the questions do seem a bit disjoint.

Note that the first question is whether you would chase the same person as your friend had their eye on, or would you pass to preserve your friendship.

I’d rank hair and smell higher up, but there is a definite lack of bums in this country to rate them as
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