Why Japanese work and don’t work

Advertisement

This combined survey and ranking from @nifty into working revealed a few attitudes that were new to me, so hopefully my readers will enjoy it too!

First, less than a third report taking a sickie or slacking on the job; I can understand, perhaps, people not wanting to admit slacking even in an anonymous setting, but in my experience with my employer, who offers more holidays than people can take, I feel that many people find it easier to phone in sick rather than go through the proper channels to request a holiday; I have no data to back this up, though!

I’m not sure if 25% workplace romances is high or low; I suppose it depends on whether or not the majority were affairs or not. I do remember when I joined our work union, at the introductory meeting they reminded everyone that one of their offerings were regular matchmaking-like social gatherings.

Here’s someone sleeping on the job:

Sleeping
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

Features of people who can’t get the job done

Following up on last week’s look at surprising features of people who get the job done, we have goo Ranking now looking at features of people who cannot get the job done.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 23rd and 27th of April 2015 500 members, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were given.

You will notice that the top feature is not being able to set a time limit, but this has no relation whatsoever to me posting this a day late…

I scored well on the other positive survey, so fortunately I don’t think too many in this survey apply to me.

I think this desk crosses the line from “productively messy” to “utter tip”.

2011-04-19 12.57.56
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Unsurprising surprising features of people good at their jobs

goo Ranking published a list of surprising features of people good at their jobs, but I think the top answers are only surprising to Western people in the sense that Japanese people rate them as surprising. (Sorry, that sentence is an utter mess and probably doesn’t make much sense!)

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 7th and 10th of April 2015 500 members, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were given.

I think I rate rather well in many of these items, especially the first four, although whether or not I am actually any good at my job (within the scope of working in Japan) is debatable.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments Trackback / Pingback (1)

Custom Search

Waste in the Japanese office

This ranking survey from goo Ranking used a word I haven’t heard for a while, mottainai, “what a waste”, in a survey entitled what things at work do people think are mottainai?

Demographics

Over the 6th and 7th of February 2013 1,122 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 60.1% of the sample were female, 10.2% in their teens, 16.6% in their twenties, 26.5% in their thirties, 25.0% in their forties, 11.1% in their fifties, and 10.6% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

My place of work tries to avoid most of the wastes below, but one thing I notice in the office but not listed here is a bilingual poster that is in all the toilet cubicles that reads something like “Please close the toilet seat after use. This saves 15 grammes of CO2 per day.” 15 grammes of CO2 is a bit difficult to picture, but apparently is about the same as boiling a kettle, according to Google. Talking of saving electricity, and related to number 4, here is a snap from Flickr, although from a train rather than an office:

#2941 This vehicle [sic] is done to weaken an air conditioner
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments (1)

What annoys Japanese in the office in summer

With the temperature hovering around 35 degrees Celcius outside, and Cool Biz meaning that it’s about 28 degrees Celcius inside the typical office, tempers are bound to be frayed, so this survey from goo Ranking looked at what aspects of their co-workers annoyed people in the office in summer.

Demographics

Over the 8th and 9th of June 2012 1,092 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 60.1% of the sample were female, 10.8% in their teens, 15.8% in their twenties, 28.9% in their thirties, 26.3% in their forties, 10.2% in their fifties, and 8.0% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I’m probably guilty of causing the first (or more correctly number 16), as I have some scented underarm deodorant in the office, so I’m sure my colleagues at least notice it! I also do tend to get a bit shivery when the air conditioner is over-strong. Number 10 annoys me, although the one person who excessively faps his fan at least does work.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments (2)

Telling new recruits off

It’s the start of the new financial year, which also means that it’s the mass intake of new recruits at the workplace, which further means that goo Ranking will conduct its annual look at what behaviour by new recruits do people want to warn them about.

Demographics

Over the 29th of February and the 1st of March 2012 1,175 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 61.4% of the sample were female, 10.0% in their teens, 16.5% in their twenties, 29.3% in their thirties, 24.1% in their forties, 10.6% in their fifties, and 9.5% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

Features of awkward colleagues

goo Ranking took a look at a subject close to my heart, what are the characteristics of coworkers who are difficult to work with.

Demographics

Between the 17th and 18th of January 2012 1,048 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 61.6% of the sample were female, 12.3% in their teens, 15.6% in their twenties, 27.9% in their thirties, 25.8% in their forties, 9.5% in their fifties, and 8.9% in their sixties. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I’d say the main problem I see with my colleagues is an unwillingness to challenge the status quo, or even to just suggest different ways of doing things. One recent case that comes to mind was that I was moving on to a new project, and I asked what other people in similar environments were using for source code control, and the answer I got back was “nothing”. After banging my head on the desk for a few minutes, I decided to go with git, which I taught myself in two minutes.

Naturally, I have none of the characteristics from the list below.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments (1)

What Japanese wanted to be when they grew up

Here’s a fun wee survey from goo Ranking, looking at the top ten jobs that Japanese wanted to do when they were a child, for both boys and girls.

Demographics

Over the 24th and 24th of May 2011 1,085 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.5% of the sample were male, 11.0% in their teens, 15.3% in their twenties, 27.5% in their thirties, 25.1% in their forties, 12.6% in their fifties, and 8.6% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I’m actually surprised by the results being a bit more adult that when I was a kid. Doctors, football players, pilots and spacemen was as far as we got, none of this author business or translators or diplomats. However, I do suspect there is a little bit of selective memory going on, as there are no train drivers for the boys.

When my brother was in the last year at primary school, I think it was, he wrote an essay on what he wanted to be; a dog eutheniser at the police pound.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments Trackbacks / Pingbacks (3)

Fun office rules in Japan

A recent ranking survey from goo Ranking looked at fun company rules that people would like to see introduced at their own workplace.

Demographics

Between the 20th and 22nd of April 2011 1,110 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 60.5% of the sample were female, 10.8% in their teens, 16.2% in their twenties, 27.4% in their thirties, 26.4% in their forties, 9.3% in their fifties, and 9.9% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

While looking up some of the companies listed, I came across more office rules from Kayac (in English). The one I found most curious was:

Lucky Wages

All our staff can play as they earn with our lucky dice scheme. They can top up their basic monthly wage by rolling the dice, introducing an element of fun and chance into their working day.

Now that is quite, quite strange!
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments (2)

Gap between imagined and reality in Japanese workplaces

The third survey for today from goo Ranking is a look at the gap people felt between before and after starting work.

Demographics

Between the 23rd and 26th of March 2011 1,070 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-base questionnaire. 53.4% of the sample were female, 10.2% in their teens, 13.1% in their twenties, 24.7% in their thirties, 23.7% in their forties, 13.3% in their fifties, and 15.0% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments (3)

Next entries »