Stuff guys didn’t want to learn about women’s public baths

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goo Ranking recently took a look at what turns men off about women’s public baths; for men it was which actually did put them off, for women what they presumed men didn’t really want to know.

Actually, I’m surprised that there’s no answer regarding foreigners in some way! Thinking about it, foreigners often complain about being stared at in public baths, but perhaps we shouldn’t worry excessively as the Japanese are also staring at their fellows.

For me, the most unattractive on the list would be hair strewn all over the sinks. I have to tidy up after my wife washes her hair in the bathroom, and that’s off-putting enough, so multiply that by how many ever hundred of customers…

Here’s a typical sento, a public bath distinct from an onsens, hot springs, as the water is ordinary heated water, not naturally geothermally heated.

Sento
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Characteristics of over-calculating women that turn people off

Today’s goo Ranking is a look at what over-calculating behaviour revealing the true state of women puts people right off. Of course, if there is also a male version published, I’ll be sure to post that too.

A couple of months ago there was an entertainment program on the television looking at models and their SNS behaviour; there was a fad for posting no-makeup selfies, but it didn’t stop most (all?) of them using skin-smoothing or eye-widening apps, and in one case even turning her extremely square jaw into a tapered point. For myself, I can guarantee that all my no-make selfies are un-retouched…

That number 10 about wanting to appear to have mental health issues seems to be a mental health issue in itself!

Here’s Duck Face in Osaka:

DSC_0861
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Stuff guys wish they’d not been told about women living alone

goo Ranking took a look at things men wish they hadn’t been told about women living alone, specifically what perhaps might be a guy’s ideal versus the reality of many a single woman’s solo life.

On television they occasionally show the home lives of both single female celebrities and ordinary people, and the situations that stand out in my memory are both dirty clothes and dirty dishes piled high.

Here’s a random (non-Japanese) sink full of random dishes:

thursday evening
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Encountering beautiful Japanese women

About how often do you encounter a beautiful woman? graph of japanese statistics

Here’s a survey, short but sweet (just like much of the subject matter), on women’s external appearance, conducted by SBS Tokyo, a beauty salon.

Demographics

Over the 17th and 19th of February 2015 300 men between the ages of 20 and 49 who had the experience of a beautiful woman crossing their path completed an internet-based questionnaire.

Note that this is talking about catching sight of a beautiful woman while going about one’s daily activity, not hanging out at a club.

Excepting every day at home, I probably see a beautiful woman every few days; what I like the most is a good overall figure and poise, which includes the ability to walk not in the fashion of a drunken giraffe.
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Working women and drinking at home

How often do you drink at home? graph of japanese statisticsThe publishing company Sankei Living recently conducted a survey into drinking habits of working women.

Demographics

During January 2015 701 female members of the City Living email newsletter members completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 5.6% of the sample were in their twenties, 35.9% in their thirties, 45.8% in their forties, and 12.7% in their fifties. 25.1% were employed full-time in positions on a promotion track, 48.8% in ordinary full-time positions, 7.6% contract employees, 9.0% dispatch workers, and 9.6% in part-time or short-term employment. Furthermore, 25.0% lived by themselves, 29.2% were single and living with their parents, 23.1% DINKS, Dual Income No Kids, 16.1% with children, and 6.6% other.

That’s quite a lot of drinking, and more worrying, the number who drink on their own is quite significant. Fortunately, at worst there was just three people having beer for breakfast or a swift one at the office.

For myself, I have drunk exactly one can of beer at home since I moved to Tokyo, and before that I averaged about one or two a year.
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Mysteries of the Japanese woman

goo Ranking reported on a survey that looked at actions by females that leave males asking “Why?”. I have reported on the same question four years ago, if you wish to cross-reference.

Demographics

Between the 17th and 18th of January 2012 1,048 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 61.6% of the sample were female, 12.3% in their teens, 15.6% in their twenties, 27.9% in their thirties, 25.8% in their forties, 9.5% in their fifties, and 8.9% in their sixties. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample. This question was for the males only.

I think everything on this list confuses me…
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Housework styles of Japanese women

Working single women, how often do you wash clothes? graph of japanese statisticsThis very detailed piece of research into women, housework and domestic appliances by Yahoo! Japan Value Insight revealed a lot of information about what the average Japanese kitchen looks like.

Demographics

Between the 9th and 12th of June 2010 800 women aged between 20 and 39 completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 25% fell into each of the age groups 20 to 24, 25 to 29, 30 to 34 and 35 to 39. 400 of the women in the sample were in full-time work, and 400 were either full-time housewives or out of work. All of them lived within the Tokyo area; either Tokyo itself or the neighbouring prefectures of Saitama, Chiba and Kanagawa. Finally, those living with parents, siblings or other relatives, or living with friends were eliminated, thus all the working singles would be living alone.

Although I’ve detailed the demographics above, you’ll note that the totals in the questions below don’t add up to 800, but the reason for that is unclear.

In Q4 I’m also unsure of the difference between not wasting water and not sending too much down the drain.
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Few Japanese women share their computers

Do you have a computer at home? graph of japanese statistics

As quite often happens, this report published by japan.internet.com regarding a survey conducted by iBridge Research Plus into women and home computers was interesting yet frustrating in the incompleteness of the data.

Demographics

On the 23rd of February 2009 300 female members of the iBridge Research Plus monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 23.3% of the sample were in their twenties, 34.7% in their thirties, 29.3% in their forties, 9.6% in their fifties, and 3.0% in their sixties.

The first frustration is that there is no domestic status described, as it would be interesting to see how they share computers with their husbands, children, parents or flatmates.

A second frustration is no information regarding whether wives get hand-me-downs from their husbands, or if their own PC was bought new, and if so, how much input did they themselves have in the decision.

We have a shared PC at home, running Vista with my wife’s account set to Japanese, mine to English, which does work rather well. We’ve no money for a computer each, but if we did I’d probably get a nice wee Netbook for myself.
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Stuff I like

Just as a change of pace today, I got a wee email from Yume Mirai about her new blog, Japan Diary of Culture. She was kind enough to mention my site in a recent entry, so I am returning the favour through this post! She does mention a few interesting survey results, and one that particularly caught my eye was where she mentions a poll on what Japanese men find attractive in women:

The result showed what kind of women are attractive for Japanese men. Those are having a mild personality ( iyashi kei ), individual ( kosei teki ), graceful ( jyohin ) and intelligent ( chiteki ).

However, another poll I translated on what nationalities people might want to marry suggested that citizens of the USA were the most popular country for wives, but I certainly wouldn’t describe the average American woman as having a mild personality, and I’m a bit sceptical on graceful too!

Anyway, it’s a nice site, and I do like hearing genuine voices, so I can recommend you visit.

Talking about genuine voices, I also like Mari’s Diary: Me and Tokyo, who was also kind enough to write a short entry about my blog. I’ve linked to her a good number of times as she has articles on many aspects of Japanese life. There’s a vast quantity of content there, and again it’s a very real and personal collection of opinions on her life in Tokyo.

Finally, in contrast to these two blogs by Japanese, Tokyo Times is Lee Chapman’s blog on his life as a gaijin in Japan. He is sometimes cynical about what he sees, but he never gets bitter, a trap that many other gaijin blogs fall into. He’s also mainly responsible for getting that article spread around the world, plucking my blog from obscurity. To insignificance.

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Housewives’ hidden hoard

How much money do you have secreted away graphSompo Japan DIY Life Insurance (yes, that is a strange name!) recently released a survey of 500 housewives of salarymen from all around the country regarding the 2005 winter bonus and the family finances, performed over three days at the start of December. The respondents were evenly distributed by age, 125 in each decade of age from their twenties to fifties. Thanks to Mari’s Diary for initially writing about it and bringing it to my attention.

To help explain this survey, there are a few cultural notes that are important. First, Japanese women do tend to run the family budget, giving their husbands a usually rather small pocket money allowance. Next, in Japan most companies have a summer and winter bonus for full-time employees, where the employees usually receive two months salary, plus or minus some amount that reflects company performance, so effectively adding about a third onto the average person’s salary. There is often little or no performance-related element within this bonus. Also, many home loans have low monthly payments plus a twice-yearly bonus element that can be up to 6 months-worth of payments in one go. Finally, note that although it is well-known that one does not tip in Japan, there is an established system of giving those who do things for you gifts of money or other items; for example, even after paying hospital fees, it is quite common to give your surgeon a few hundred thousand yen, in addition to gifts to anyone who came to visit you when in hospital. Perhaps it is this point of view that is responsible for one of my pet hates, game shows being packed with celebrities who almost never give the money to charity, even on big money shows like Who Wants to be a Millionaire.
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