Tastes of summer in Japan, from vegetables to ice cream

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Which do you prefer? graph of japanese statistics

There’s been a definite lack of good goo Ranking surveys recently, so today I’ll do a ranking and survey hybrid from @nifty looking at the tastes of summer.

I like my Häagen-Dazs, but as I eat it irregularly and usually choose their time-limited special flavours (I have mango milk and truffle sitting in the freezer) I cannot name a favourite flavour. However, I do find the Gelato Meister brand better – despite the naming, it is actually sherbet with high fruit content; I’m looking forward to the 25% Scilian lemon one more than the Dazs’ it’s sitting beside.
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Vast majority approve of oddly-shaped vegetables

What do you think about oddly-shaped vegetables? graph of japanese statisticsWith this summer’s poor weather causing a thin harvest of vegetables thus an increase in prices, iShare decided to look at a current hot topic, oddly-shaped vegetables.

Demographics

Between the 18th and 21st of August 2009 538 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private online questionnaire. 56.3% of the sample were male, 29.7% in their twenties, 31.4% in their thirties, and 38.8% in their forties.

I’ve not seen any oddly-shaped veggies in the supermarket myself, although I’ve bought such ones at a farmers market or other direct from the farm outlet.

As for price increases, potatoes and onions are definitely up about 25%, cucumbers are in a bit of short supply, so it’s difficult to say, and lettuce is very expensive, as most seem to be about the same price as last year but half the size. I’ve not really noticed any difference for other veggies, however.
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Japanese and vegetables

Do you think you consume enough vegetables? graph of japanese statisticsThis is a subject where I think stereotypes diverge greatly from the reality. Ask someone what the Japanese eat and you get tales of lots of vegetable-based side dishes lovingly prepared, but if you observe the reality you’ll find that fast foods and fried foods abound, and vegetables are often limited to just a lettuce leaf or a teacup-sized salad of sliced cabbage. To find out more about this subject, DIMSDRIVE Research recently performed a survey on vegetables.

Demographics

Between the 18th and 26th of July 2007 8,135 members of DIMSDRIVE Research’s monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 57.0% of the sample was female, 0.8% in their teens, 14.9% in their twenties, 35.5% in their thirties, 28.5% in their forties, 14.1% in their fifties, and 6.2% aged sixty or older. In addition, 12.8% lived alone, 24.0% lived with one other person, 25.6% with two others, 24.1% with three others, and 13.5% with four or more other people.

Supermarket vegetable quality is very variable; I sometimes use Jusco or Daiei, and find that most of the time their veggies are average to poor quality. However, right opposite Jusco is Kohyo, a slightly more upmarket chain who are just as cheap, if not cheaper, than Jusco yet have so much higher quality. The best I’ve found in town was a farmer’s co-op shop that was almost half the price of the nearest supermarket.

In Q3SQ4, I was suprised to see that country or area of origin of food was relatively low on the list despite the recent scares about Chinese foods being laced with chemicals and the amount of emphasis that the average Japanese seems to place on foods from particular traditional localities in Japan.
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