Where Japan visitors tweet from

Advertisement

Rather than the usual goo Ranking silliness, let’s instead have a look at a ranking from RJC Research and Nightley regarding where inbound tourists post to SNS from.

The survey mentions by name Twitter and Weibo (China’s local Twitter-like service), then “etc”, without going into details on what they might be. How exactly they determined who was a tourist is probably a trade secret, so there was no discussion of that either. It mentions the sample size was about 230,000 SNS entries.

The score reported was based on the number of SNS mentions, but weighted, presumably by how many followers or how many likes a post got. The raw SNS post count was about a third to a half of the weighted score.

The report contained one overall total and five sub-genres, but since the other genres (sights, leisure facilities, nature, and shopping) were partially covered by the main ranking, I’ll only report on the food genre.

Here’s a photo of edible Snoopys from USJ; probably meat (definitely not dog!) filled steamed buns.

USJ, Halloween style
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,,

Comments

Hashtags of the year 2013 for Japan

The official Twitter Japan blog recently published the top 10 hashtags of the year and other various popular terms.

Before the top tens, here’s the top one mascot character:


Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

Features of Twitter users you want to stop following

goo Ranking took a look at the features of Twitter users that make people want to stop following.

Demographics

The survey was conducted between the 4th and 8th of October 2013 where 1,074 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. However, goo Ranking have recently revamped their ranking page and have dropped the link to their demographics. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I generally ignore Twitter, so none of the below bother me! I couldn’t find a nice photo of Twitter, but here are a couple of sweet tweeters instead:

tweet
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

Custom Search

One in four Japanese Tweeters have more than one account

When did you start using Twitter? graph of japanese statisticsjapan.internet.com recently reported on a survey by goo Research into Twitter, with the focus in their short report being on multiple account holders.

Demographics

Between the 28th of June and the 2nd of July 2013 1,065 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 54.1% of the sample were male, 13.7% in their teens, 15.4% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 17.1% in their forties, 15.0% in their fifties, and 17.2% aged sixty or older.

I have three sort-of active accounts, all three tied to different blogs for autoposting only; @WhatJapanThinks is the one to follow for this blog.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

Friending your boss on Facebook

How often do you normally use social media? graph of japanese statisticsjapan.internet.com recently reported on an interesting survey conducted by Nifty, comnico and Lifemedia into social media usage, focusing on young soon-to-graduate students.

Demographics

Between the 8th and 11th of March 2013 559 social media-using people who were due to graduate at the end of this academic year and were aged between 20 and 26 completed an internet survey, but it was not reported how the sample was gathered. 62.1% of the sample were female, and 37.9% male.

Coincidentally, my new group leader today introduced himself, including his Facebook page, and suggested that people interested should befriend him, so I shall do that and see what happens…
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,,,

Comments

Typhoon out-Tweets iPhone 5 in Japan

Today I present a statistic rather than a survey for a change, a look by Biglobe’s Twipple service at the top-trending Twitter keywords (not hashtags) for September 2012, as reported by japan.internet.com.

About 1.384 billion Tweets were generated in Japan in September 2012, and these formed the data from which the following top ten was generated. It is also noted that “typhoon” racked up 57.15 million tweets on its peak day, whereas the second-placed “iPhone 5” managed just 6 million at its peak.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,,

Comments

Young folk now not just shouting but tweeting at the telly

Do you ever actually shout at, wisecrack at people on TV? graph of japanese statisticsIn a survey from iResearch reported on by japan.internet.com into SNS usage there was the rather depressing to me result that young folk today are watching the television with one eye and their mobiles with the other, and rather than just yelling at the goggle box they are spewing their thoughts for all to see on Twitter.

Demographics

Between the 12th and 14th of June 2012 300 male and female members of the iResearch online monitor group aged between 20 and 39 who were also SNS users completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographic breakdown was provided.

You may have noticed that this survey is for a change not from goo Research – after a couple of years I have finally found where japan.internet.com hid all their other survey data, so I hope I can have a more varied selection for you in the future!
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Dangerous tweets

The phrasing of this survey question from goo Ranking is a bit odd, but it’s rather a good list none-the-less, looking at what people think it might be dangerous to tweet about.

Demographics

Between the 18th and 20th of October 2011 1,092 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.3% of the sample were male, 11.2% in their teens, 16.2% in their twenties, 25.7% in their thirties, 25.8% in their forties, 11.5% in their fifties, and 9.5% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

If numbers 7 and 8, for instance, were followed on Facebook, it would be a very, very quiet place indeed! That reminds me of the recent story about how three-quarters of the photos of British people on Facebook are from when they were drunk!

I’m more likely to post to Google+ myself, and the only one I’d stop at would be posting a photo taken at home and tagged with location information.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

Why Japanese follow you on Twitter

As a follow-up to last week’s look at why Japanese stop following people, this time it is the opposite question from goo Ranking, what characteristics of people makes one want to follow them on Twitter.

Demographics

Over the 6th and 7th of June 2011 1,148 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.6% of the sample were male, 12.1% in their teens, 16.9% in their twenties, 28.0% in their thirties, 25.4% in their forties, 9.7% in their fifties, and 7.9% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

As my Twitter followed count is very low (I rarely read it myself!) I think just about everyone falls under the same hobbies classification, namely running a Japan blog.

By the way, I’ve been playing around with Google’s new social network Google+ (drop me a line if you want an invite!), and I suspect it might have more of an effect on Twitter than Facebook; I’ve never worked out how in Twitter to follow a conversation; everything seems just one way to me.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments (1) Trackback / Pingback (1)

Why Japanese stop following you on Twitter

An interesting ranking survey by goo Ranking looked at why people come to want to stop following someone on Twitter.

Demographics

Between the 20th and 22nd of April 2011 1,110 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 60.5% of the sample were female, 10.8% in their teens, 16.2% in their twenties, 27.4% in their thirties, 26.4% in their forties, 9.3% in their fifties, and 9.9% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I only follow people I know, and don’t really read Twitter anyway, so none of the below in any way relate to what I do!

Next week I hope to have the opposite survey for you, why people want to follow someone.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments (2) Trackback / Pingback (1)

Next entries »