Mount Fuji top Japan destination for Chinese

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Would you like to visit Japan in the future? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey from the Nippon Research Center looked at tourism to Japan. It was part of an omnibus survey, with another six topics covered, but none of the others directly related to Japan.

Demographics

The exact date of the survey was not reported, but 5,000 people were interviewed by both face-to-face and internet-based questionnaires. There were exactly 50:50 male and female, 28.0% between 15 and 29, 28.0% in their thirties, 28.0% in their forties, and 16.0% in their fifties. There were 370 people selected from each of the cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chengdu, and Shenyang, and 210 people from each of 15 other cities.

I’m surprised by Mount Fuji being so high in the list, but perhaps it is the only place most people can recall, just as everyone would say “The Great Wall” about China. It’s also a surprise to see both Osaka and Nagoya outdoing Tokyo, although if you add up all the areas of Tokyo…
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Showing foreign tourists the real Japan

Here’s a bit of an interesting survey from iShare, looking at what Japanese would introduce foreigners to.

Demographics

Between the 23th and 29th of December 2008 709 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 55.0% of the sample were male, 12.1% in their twenties, 47.5% in their thirties, 30.7% in their forties, 7.6% in their fifties, and 2.0% in their teens or aged sixty or older.

I’d put Osaka higher up the list in Q1, but I’m biased! I’d also put Kanazawa higher, as it’s Kyoto without so many tourists, and I really enjoyed the one time I visited.

I wouldn’t subject anyone to Japanese curry, but I’d put Japanese-style snacks higher. I think that refers to Japanese flavours in Western-style sweets like chestnut Kit-Kats or wasabi (horseradish-like) flavoured crisps, rather than traditional Japanese confectionary based around bean-paste.

Judging by another survey, water-squirting toilets are popular amongst the foreign population, but game arcades and Scissors-Paper-Stone are hardly unique Japanese features. On the other hand, some of the machines in Japanese arcades have to be seen to be believed, so perhaps the first is a good choice!
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Even the Chinese don’t trust Chinese food

Do you feel friendly towards China? graph of japanese statisticsToday’s survey is from not just Japan, but also from China, in a wide-ranging survey from Gallup International conducted into the matters of tourism, food safety, the environment, and the relationship between the two countries.

Demographics

For Japan, between the 5th and 17th of November 2008 1,200 people aged between 15 and 79 were chosen from all over the country at random from residents information and answered the survey either face-to-face or were left with the questionnaire. For China, between the 13th and 19th of November 2008 1,266 people between the ages of 18 and 59 from the 15 largest cities in China completed an internet-based questionnaire.

In the environmental questions in Q5, perhaps surprisingly China is more concerned than Japan about them, but when one looks at their particular worries, Chinese citizens are worried about the immediate threat from airborne and water pollution, this result being reflected in their distrust of their own food products.

I would like to visit the Great Wall of China and see the Terracotta warriors in their home settings, but I worry about being able to find veggie food and about the general level of hygene in the country.
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Are Japanese scared of tourists?

How has the number of foreign tourists changed recently? graph of japanese statisticsIf you have been following the Japanese blogs or news wires this week, you surely must have seen headlines like – well, I thought I saw headlines, but they now seem to have disappeared! Anyway, there was quite a bit of fuss about 53% of Japanese seeing public safety problems due to an increase in tourism, but what is the truth behind that headline? Read the full details from the survey by the Cabinet Office Japan into Tourism Nation Japan and the Japan Tourism Agency.

Demographics

3,000 adults from all over the country were randomly selected from resident registers, and they were visited for face-to-face interviews between the 16th and 26th of October 2008. 1,853 people, or 61.8%, were available and completed the questionnaire. A breakdown by age and sex was not presented, however.

Note that the questions below were part of a bigger survey on other unreported topics.

Q3 is the question that has sparked the controversy, with the negative answers being singled out. My personal opinion is that since the increase in tourism is mostly from Korea and China, countries with none-too-friendly a view of Japan, and the Chinese especially have a reputation for being ill-mannered, and they are the biggest foreign criminal element in Japan, I can see one reason why the figure is high. Of course, one has to contrast that with the equally large percentage who expect the increase in tourists to decrease such prejudice through mutual understanding.
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Space, the final frontier for Japanese tourists

DIMSDRIVE Research conducted an opinion poll amongst 6,416 members (39.9% male) of the their internet monitor group about their attitudes to outer space tourism. Having solved the food problem for the third who worry about eating in space, perhaps next the ISS engineers need to address the lack of a washlet in the inflight loo?

Q1: Do you think you want to travel into outer space? (Sample size=6,416)

Definitely want to go 33.7%
Somewhat want to go 33.8%
Don’t really want to go 15.0%
Don’t want to go at all 14.4%
Don’t know 3.1%

On average, men were 10 percentage points more likely to definitely want to go, but the older both sexes got, the less keen they were.

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