Smartphone users keener to give away their privacy

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A recent survey from goo Research into mobile phone location services, ie, these functions like foursquare, Google Latitude, and Facebook location was reported on (and sponsored by?) by AdverTimes.

Demographics

Sadly, to find out the full demographics I suspect one has to buy their paper magazine Senden Kaigi, which in their 15th May 2012 edition featured an article entitled “Consumer Psychology in the SNS-facilitated mutual surveillance society”, of which this report is a digest. In Q1, the 2008 survey was carried out in December of that year with 2,077 respondents, and this year’s survey was in April with 2,214 respondents, all from the usual goo Research online monitor panel.

I’m reluctant to check in when out and about in town – I’ve only attached location information to photos when I’ve been passing through commuting home; there was an interesting article a while ago about someone in Tokyo who used that sort of public information plus Twitter to find two people in real time through their mobile presence.

I wonder what the reasons are for smartphone users being more likely to reveal information – is it that smartphone apps make it easy and fun to do, or is it that the people who want to reveal information tend to use smartphones? Perhaps if one buys the magazine one can find out!
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Majority reveal no personal information online

How many paid-for apps have you downloaded? graph of japanese statisticsHere’s another very interesting smartphone survey, this time looking at smartphones and privacy awareness, and conducted by goo Research.

Demographics

Over the 30th and 31st of May 2011 1,573 smartphone owning members of the goo Research online monitor panel completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.4% of the sample had an iPhone, 47.6% an Android-based phone; 1.0% had had their smartphone for less than a month, 12.5% between one and three months, 28.3% between three and six months, 25.3% six months to a year, 22.8% for one or two years, and 10.1% more than two years. 71.9% of the sample were male, 16.7% in their twenties, 34.6% in their thirties, 29.9% in their forties, 14.9% in their fifties, and 3.9% aged sixty or older.

I’m really surprised about the very low disclosure rate of who one works for, but it does very much ring true with what people who were sceptical of whether LinkedIn could make it in Japan said.
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SNS privacy issues in Japan

This short report from japan.internet.com on a survey from goo Research on SNS (Social Network Service) privacy produced some interesting results that seem to run counter to the popular image of Japanese SNS users.

Demographics

Between the 16th and 19th of May 2011 1,082 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.2% of the sample were male, 16.4% in their teens, 18.8% in their twenties, 21.5% in their thirties, 15.8% in their forties, 15.3% in their fifties, and 12.2% aged sixty or older.

Note that in this survey, Twitter counts as an SNS, although I’ve never really understood why. Also note that the public viewing described below might be limited to only friends.
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What is considered personal information in Japan?

How do you throw away junk mail? graph of japanese statisticsThis short but rather sweet survey from blogch and iShare into ranking of what is considered personal information made me think, and I hope it does the same for you.

Demographics

Between the 12th and 14th of May 2008 636 members of blogch completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 54.9% of the sample was male, 14.5% in their twenties, 46.7% in their thirties, 27.4% in their forties, and 11.5% in their teens or over fifty.

I don’t know why home email address was not included in the survey, nor why people help their age more private than their date of birth!

For me, there is no way I would part with my cell phone number and email address, and for passport number, I’d query the need for people to ask for it rather than be concerned about the privacy issue.

All junk mail, as well as all other envelopes with addresses on them, go through the shredder before disposal, although I always suspect that the reason is more to stop the rubbish police tracking us down for chucking stuff out on the wrong day!

{democracy:18}

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Revealing credit cards scariest in real life, email address scariest in cyberspace

Do you feel resistance to disclosing personal information? graph of japanese opinionjapan.internet.com recently published the results of a survey by goo Research into revealing personal information on the internet where people other than friends can read it. In the middle of October 1,052 of goo’s monitor pool successfully completed a private web-based questionnaire. 56.4% of the sample was female, and 2.5% in their teens, 22.0% in their twenties, 42.7% in their thirties, 23.7% in their forties, and 9.2% in their fifties. Regular readers may remember a previous survey on a similar subject showing that over 90% of bloggers were anonymous.

Although the survey’s main theme is about the online world, the first two questions presented in the summary report actually refer to issues regarding real-world businesses. It seems odd to me that people are twice as wary of giving out their date of birth over the internet than in real life.

Personally, I feel reluctant to revealing my email address in particular, as I’m never sure what spam I’ll end up with, and a lot of Japanese companies, even reputable ones, do not provide simple one-click unsubscribe options.
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Mobile phone privacy

Anyone ever peeked at your phone's mail, call history, etc? graph of japanese opinionjapan.internet.com, in conjuction with Cross Marketing, recently investigated mobile phone privacy. They sampled 150 men and 150 women, 16.6% aged 18 or 19, 16.6% in their twenties, and so on up to 16.6% in their sixties.

Note that over three times as many people take their mobiles into public toilets than into their toilet at home. I wonder what is hidden behind that statistic! Im also rather surprised to see that less than a third of all user employ any security locks on their phone; note almost all phones have lock features what require a four digit code to open them. Some of the more advanced phones go as far as having a fingerprint reader that may be used to unlock the device.
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