Password management in Japan

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Would you like to use for login security? graph of japanese statisticsDDS, Digital Development Systems, a company that makes software to manage passwords through biometrics, recently conducted a survey entitled password refugees, looking at password usage.

Demographics

Over the 2nd and 3rd of February 2015 400 members of the Macromill Research Monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was aged between 20 and 50 years old, but no further demographics were provided. However, knowing Macromill’s usual style, it would have people aged been between 20 and 59 years old, 50:50 male and female, and 25% in each of the age bands 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s.

I use KeePass to manage my passwords, but with Chrome being good at managing passwords, I rarely need to load it up.
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Date of birth favourite email password in Japan

How many email accounts do you often use? graph of japanese statisticsWith news of LulzSec and other hackers making off with passwords, and other attacks based around people’s GMail accounts, this recent survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, into email passwords is rather timely. Note that I have previously translated an older survey into passwords.

Demographics

Over the 31st of May and the 1st of June 2011 1,077 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.7% of the sample were male, 17.0% in their teens, 17.7% in their twenties, 21.4% in their thirties, 16.1% in their forties, 16.1% in their fifties, and 11.8% aged sixty or older.

I have absolutely no idea what my email passwords are! My Gmail ones are 20 characters long and randomly generated and managed by KeePass (fiddly to get the hang of, but this is a good tutorial) and my ISP one is the one they supplied, a 10 character mixed case alphanumeric one. My wife, without any training from me, keeps her in text files and uses a different one for each site, at least 8 characters long and a mix of usually names and semi-random numbers. Not the best of security, but at least she varies on every site, which in practise might actually provide more overall security than one big long one used everywhere.
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How to hack a quarter of all Japanese web users’ accounts

Have you ever forgotton your password and/or ID? graph of japanese opinionjapan.internet.com published the results of a survey by goo Research into the use of web site passwords carried out at the start of this month. 1,091 members of goo’s research monitor group successfully completed the private web-based questionnaire. 56.7% of the sample was female, and 20.3% were in their twenties, 41.5% in their thirties, 24.5% in their forties, 10.2% in their fifties, and 3.6% in their sixties.

The stunning figure is that 266 people, or 24.4%, admitted to using a password identical to their user name, if allowed by the web site. 43.4% said they wrote it down, which arguably can be better than memorising a simpler one, although no questions were asked in this survey on how complex passwords were.

This survey highlights perhaps two possible approaches to hacking in addition to the headline’s method of using the same user name and password. Another would be a phishing attack, but one that on password entry presented a password error. Since almost half the people say they repeatedly guess at the password, this type of fake site might yield multiple passwords for various sites. Finally, an attack that I have never heard of, but seems ridiculously simple for such situations as online game bulletin boards for competing clans, where, by means of a backdoor into the password routines, one can extract user names and passwords which can then be used for whatever purposes, once you track down the places that that user frequents.

Back on the subject of personal password management, I once tried using a password management tool, but it was excessively cryptic and after entering two or three passwords I forgot exactly how to go about entering a master password, and couldn’t recover from the situation, so I had to delete the tool!

I can’t find a similar survey of passwords from other countries, but if anyone can provide a link, it would make a useful comparison.
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