No smoking law; public says not just for Olympics, not just for Tokyo

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Do you support restaurants, etc, becoming all non-smoking? graph of japanese statistics

With Tokyo Olympics coming up, one of the hot topics is that the International Olympic Committee and the WHO have agreed that they should promote a smoke-free Olympics, in order to protect against second-hand smoke, but with Japan being a bit of a smokers’ paradise and with the government owning a third of Japan Tobacco, they are a bit lagging on things. However, recently a bill has been introduced that would require all restuarants over 30 square metres to go non-smoking. To see what the public thought of this, Intage Research conducted a survey into going non-smoking.

Despite extensive advert campaigns like the one pictured below, Japan Tobacco seems to have failed to convince the general public that the problem of smoking is not disease but manner issues like litter. Furthermore, Japan must be about the only country with more restrictions on outdoor smoking – for instance many major train stations ban smoking within a radius of a kilometre or so – versus indoor – basically no restrictions in restaurants. I remember my first experience in Japan many years ago; they asked “Smoking or Non-Smoking?”, we said “Non”, so they lifted the ashtray off the table. Things have got better now, but not much…

Anti-smoking ads

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Japanese opinions on the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Are you enjoying the prospect of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics? graph of japanese statisticsWith less than four years to go now, here is an early survey looking at how Japanese people think about the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, conducted by BIGLOBE, who describe themselves as a seller of cheap smartphones and SIM card.

I’m looking forward to the Olympics, although I may not be in Tokyo for them, which I think I would consider as a plus! If I am here, I think I will volunteer for some form of guiding or marshalling task, as it might be quite fun to do.

Regarding the opening ceremony, my first choice would be Beat Takeshi too, although he would either do a wonderful job or an utterly cringe-worthy job, so I suspect that the Olympic committee might go for a safer choice. If it’s Yasushi Akimoto, the person responsible for inflicting The AKBs on everyone, I may very well de-emigrate…
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Which acts should open the Tokyo Olympics?

There’s still five years to go, so no doubt this topic will appear again a good number of times, so here goes with the first look at what acts people want to see at the Tokyo Olympics opening ceremony.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where on the 17th of February 2015 500 members, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were given.

I cannot argue with the top two; Sakamoto will bring some class, and Southern All Stars are a great band for live events, but my personal choice is not there, perhaps due to them not being singers, the Yoshida Brothers:

And an appearance from World Order would not be amiss:

Who would you pick?
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Japanese support the Tokyo Olympic bid three to one

What do you think of the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics bid? graph of japanese statisticsWith the IOC decision this weekend, DIMSDRIVE Research published their survey on 2020 Olympics and bid activities, finding that although one in three are ambivalent about the whole affair, three to one of the remaining two-thirds favour it.

Demographics

Between the 6th and 19th of August 2013 7,311 members of the DIMSDRIVE monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 58.8% of the sample were male, 4.6% were in their teens and twenties, 16.4% in their thirties, 31.7% in their forties, 26.9% in their fifties, 14.9% in their sixties, and 5.6% aged seventy or older. Unfortunately, there was no breakdown of the area of residence of the respondents, but DIMSDRIVE usually has around 40% from the Tokyo and surrounding Kanto area.

I’m personally in favour of the bid, partially out of a desire to feel schadenfreude towards those I find are campaigning against Tokyo due to personal dislike of Japan or due to excessive Fukushima-related scaremongering. Indeed, I suspect that the deciding factor will be whether science can triumph over nuclear irrationality, but I also worry that the Japanese team will not be very good at getting the scientific, factual case across.
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Which Japanese Olympians will Japan be following?

Are you interested in the London Olympics? graph of japanese statisticsWith the London Olympics opening at the weekend, now is a good time to look at this survey from Macromill Research into said London Olympics.

Demographics

Over the 20th and 21st of June 2012 500 members of the Macromill monitor group completed a private online questionnaire. The sample was exactly 250:250 male to female, and 25% in their twenties, 25% in their thirties, 25% in their forties, and 25% in their fifties.

I’ll probably watch nothing more than the highlight shows, myself, and perhaps the finals of the short-track athletics.

Looking at the list below, from what I know Kohei Uchimura should easily take gold in the men’s gymnastics, but Kosuke Kitajima is perhaps going to struggle to get gold. Koji Murofushi is over the hill, I think, but the women’s football team should get some colour of medal, although I suppose it depends on who they end up playing against in the knock-out stages.
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Japan’s prospects for Vancouver

How many medals in total of any colour do you think Japan will get this year? graph of japanese statisticsWith the Winter Olympics due to open on the 12th (or 13th Japan time), here’s a timely survey from iShare into the Vancouver Winter Olympics.

Demographics

Between the 19th and 22nd of January 2010 497 members of the CLUb BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 58.8% of the sample were male, 33.2% in their twenties, 30.4% in their thirties, and 36.4% in their forties.

There’s been two interesting bits of news about Japanese athletes: first, Miho Takagi, the 15 year old speed skater with the unfortunately-designed outfit, has been mentioned on the news as much regarding her chance to be able to use English as her actual skating, then a lead story on one channel today was Kazuhiro Kokubo, the halfpipe snowboarder, getting banned from Japan’s welcoming ceremony for being sloppy-dressed at Narita airport, having – shock-horror – a loose tie and his shirt tails hanging out.

The Olympic committee have set a target of 10 medals for Vancouver, but 85% think Japan will get four or less…
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Looking back at the Beijing Olympics

Did the Japanese athletes perform to expectations? graph of japanese statisticsWith the Olympics over for another four years and with Japan getting a reasonable haul of medals, Macromill performed a survey into post-Olympic views.

Demographics

Over the 25th and 26th of August 2008 516 members of the Macromill Monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female in each age group; 24.8% were in their twenties, 25.2% in their thirties, 25.2% in their forties, and 24.8% in their fifties.

I didn’t watch much of the Olympics, but for me the most moving moments were Usian Bolt winning his two individual medals; celebrating the 100 metres win 10 metres before the finish line, then pulling out all the stops on the 200 metres to win by the proverbial mile.

Also, just today I read that Kosuke Kitajima, the double-double gold medal swimmer, was voted best beerist for knocking back a pint or two in celebration!
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Olympics and name sponsor awareness

First, a quick apology for no post yesterday, but I was in transit and away from a free internet connection, and on top of that the site seemed to have crashed… Hopefully I can post to my usual schedule for the rest of the week.

Since I didn’t have a decent internet connection, this is a survey from a couple of weeks ago conducted by the Nippon Research Council into olympic sponsorship and olympic viewing intentions.

Demographics

Between the 30th of May and the 4th of June 2008 1,200 members of the NRC monitor panel resident in the Tokyo city area (Tokyo city, Saitama, Chiba and Kanagawa) and the Keihanshin area of Kansai (Kyoto city, Osaka city and Hyogo) completed a private internet-based questionnaire. Sex and age breakdown was not noted.

Note that Panasonic and National are both brands of Matsushita Electric Industrial, but at the AGM of shareholders on Friday the 20th of June 2008 the board got a motion officially approved to change the company name to Panasonic and to kill off the National brand (used mostly for domestic appliances and other white goods), unifying everything worldwide under the Panasonic banner.

It’s all a bit depressing that the two best-known sponsors are suppliers of highly-sugared empty calories and fat-laden burgers, hardly the image of the ultimate in human physical achievement.
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Turin Olympic Expectations

How interested are you in the Turin Olympics? graph of japanese opinionThis is my first translation from JR Tokai Express Research, apparently part of the Central Japan Railways group of companies, and it’s a very topical subject, a look at what people are thinking about regarding the upcoming Turin Olympics. They interviewed 436 people by means of an internet questionnaire over four days at the start of February, although it is not clear how they collected this sample. 110 people were in their twenties, 111 in their thirties, 110 in their forties, 110 in their fifties and 95 ages sixty or over. The numbers for each sex is not given.

Although the host city’s name in English is Turin, the Japanese use (as would be expected, of course) the Italian pronunciation as the guide for adopting it into Japanese, thus Torino. As one of these “You know you’ve been in Japan too long…” moments, I’m familiar with the locations of Torino, Firenze, Munchen, etc, but occasionally I have to pause to translate Vienna and Naples in order to understand where they are. Mind you, back when I was a kid, and in fact up until I was about 25 years old or so, I was under the impression that Ibiza and Eye-bee-tha were two totally separate places.
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