MyVoice survey translation bites the dust…

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Probably my favourite data provider, MyVoice, have recently changed their web site to require free registration for access to the full data from their monthly reports. My requirements for selecting what to translate for What Japan Thinks is to only choose freely-viewable pages, so sadly I have to drop them off my roster. By requiring registration to read the full results they are obviously wishing to expand their email lists, so by translating the whole thing on my site I could be judged to be interfering with their business practices. I hope you understand.

Talking of MyVoice, one survey from last month that I wanted to translate on biscuits and cookies was previously summarised by Mari of Watashi to Tokyo.

Oh, and you may have noticed that I have recently upped the translation pace to basically two per day – my new netbook is just right for a quick translation on the train home. I’d welcome comments on that, and on the new comments format with Gravatars and nesting.

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New flu vaccination not high priority in Japan

Will you get vaccinated for swine flu? graph of japanese statisticsWith swine flu doing the rounds of many countries including Japan, here’s an indepth look by MyVoice at swine flu.

Demographics

Over the first five days of November 13,813 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 1% in their teens, 12% in their twenties, 34% in their thirties, 31% in their forties, and 22% aged fifty or older.

When the pandemic first appeared, the press completely overblew the whole affair, but now it seems quite the opposite, with very little information being available on even the basic information such as the number of new cases per week. Also, there is no public service advertising (that I have seen) on television giving tips on how to cover a cough or what measures one should take to prepare for a serious epidemic.

I’ll probably not bother with a vaccination, not out of worries about the vaccine itself, but just that by the time it gets round to me I’ll probably either have had it or the epidemic will have blown itself out.
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A beer over dinner at home favourite way to booze in Japan

Where do you usually drink alcohol the most? graph of japanese statisticsHere’s another interesting look at drinking alcohol with MyVoice.

Demographics

Over the first five days of October 2009 13,102 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 14% in their twenties, 32% in their thirties, 32% in their forties, and 22% aged fifty or older.

I just read today about Japan and the social cost of alcohol, which is interesting reading, and I agree on the whole with the facts and the conclusion, although the estimate of the number of alcoholics seems on the low side, or else the diagnosis of an alcoholic in Japan is somewhat different to the west. The most interesting figure, though, is the social cost of alcohol. This article say 6.6 trillion yen, whereas a similar figure from a BBC article suggests £6.4 billion in terms of productivity losses. Working at 150 yen to the pound and populations of 130 million versus 65 million, that makes the cost to Japan industry almost 3.5 times greater!
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Friendships from high school figure highly in Japan

About how many friends do you have? graph of japanese statisticsHere’s an interesting look at socialising and friends from MyVoice.

Demographics

Over the first five days of October 2009 13,534 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 2% in their teens, 13% in their twenties, 32% in their thirties, 31% in their forties, and 22% aged fifty or older.

Even though the sample used was from the MyVoice internet community, in Q2 you can see that only 8.3% form friendships through the internet. Despite, or perhaps because, being an anti-social git myself, I have made a good number of acquaintances through my blogging, and dare I say it even a friend or two, as I have done through my trusted computing conference attendance.

Two years ago I translated another survey on inter-personal relationships.
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Burger, burger, doughnut, chicken

Which is your most favourite fast food chain? graph of japanese statisticsThat’s the top four fast food places in Japan, specifically Makudo, Mosu, Misudo and Kenta – McDonalds, Mos Burger, Mister Donut and KFC – according to MyVoice’s sixth look at fast food. I translated their fifth survey on fast food two years ago.

Demographics

Over the first five days of September 2009 14,023 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 2% in their teens, 14% in their twenties, 34% in their thirties, 30% in their forties, and 20% aged fifty or older.

If you’re a burger fan, note that the Japan Blog Matsuri is doing hamburgers this month.

I’m a big Mister Donut fan, as they have a lot of convenient shops, a good point card system, unlimited refills of hot black coffee or hot au lait, you can stay as long for as you can put up with the US DJ and his muzak, and oh, rather nice doughnuts. I’m quite partial to their chocolate and salty caramel one, and their standard menu items, Pon De Ring Black Sugar and Pon De Tofu Kinako (sweet soy flour), are always a good choice.

The bit about wifi refers to a current campaign at McDonalds where those with Nintendo DSes can connect to an in-shop LAN and download some free games.
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Consumption in Japan

Compared to a year ago, how has your desire to purchase changed? graph of japanese statisticsEven though consumer prices have dropped 2.4% over the last year, consumer spending is flat here, so this recent survey from MyVoice into consumption attitudes in Japan is very timely. Also, today I read an interesting article on Observing Japan about amongst other things how Keynesian economics says consumption is the key to economic growth, but after ten years of uncertainty in Japan, how can the DPJ pry open people’s wallets?

Demographics

Over the first five days of September 2009 14,139 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 2% in their teens, 14% in their twenties, 34% in their thirties, 30% in their forties, and 20% aged fifty or older.

I’m all too aware of cutting back and delaying spending, not helped by having a 30% cut in bonuses in the summer, which meant that there was very little money left over after paying the bonus portion of the mortgage. Our home washing machine is liable to conk out at any moment with the drum disintegrating, the buttons losing their responsiveness, and the spin cycle making funny noises, but… The rice cooker pot is also way past replacement time, and the microwave’s been a bit dodgy too… If only I had ten times as many visitors I could easily pay it all off! Anyone want to buy an advertisement on What Japan Thinks?
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Curry eating habits in Japan

About how often do you eat curry at home? graph of japanese statisticsI must have missed the first two times this survey came around, as I see this survey from MyVoice into curry is marked as their third time of asking. I’ve previously done DIMSDRIVE on curry, however.

Demographics

Over the first five days of August 2009 13,747 members of the MyVoice internet community successfully completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 1% in their teens, 15% in their twenties, 34% in their thirties, 30% in their forties, and 20% aged fifty or older.

Most Japanese currys are really more like spicy stews, and as you can see from Q5, none of the top brands have Indian branding. I usually have currys made from dehydrated roux base, which are OK I suppose, but very occasionally I have a boil-in-the-bag, which are excellent! Sadly, there’s no Indian curry houses nearby that I can get a proper carry-out from.
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Room rate, food and hot tub top deciders when choosing Japanese hotel rooms

How often do you stay in hotels other than on business? graph of japanese statisticsMyVoice recently took a look at how Japanese use hotels and other lodgings, in particular what criteria they use for selecting them.

Demographics

Over the first five days of August 2009 13,801 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 2% in their teens, 16% in their twenties, 33% in their thirties, 29% in their forties, and 20% aged fifty or older.

The last hotel I stayed in was the Westin Awaji, which is a very nice hotel in a great location. One of the criteria we used was me having a point card, and another was being a western-style managed hotel, as the previous night we’d stayed in a Japanese-managed hotel. One big difference was that the Westin had a whole non-smoking floor, the other one had just half a dozen rooms at the far end of one corridor that still had a lingering hint of tobacco clinging to the walls. However, the Westin was disappointing for food, especially the breakfast was not the full buffet one expects from their chains.
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Cheap beer-like drinks most often consumed alone at home

What do you usually drink? graph of japanese statisticsFirst there was happoshu, a most foul fizzy alcohol drink, then there was third sector beer brewed from non-traditional ingredients like corn, peas, and old socks. Now there is new genre fourth sector beers, which seem to be going back to being based on the traditional barley, but with lower sugar, carbohydrates, purine, and taste content. This new genre of brews were the subject of a survey from MyVoice.

Demographics

Over the first five days of August 2009 13,517 members of the MyVoice internet community completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 15% were in their twenties, 34% in their thirties, 30% in their forties, and 21% aged fifty or older.

I recently had some Style Free, I think it was, a zero carbohydrates drink with just 35 or so calories a can, which was surprisingly pleasant, and without the heavy sugary aftertaste of many other canned beers. It seems to be a happoshu rather than a new genre beer, but let’s ignore that and continue with my description. The morning after was better as well, without an overnight festering of sugars in my mouth. I recommend you give them a try – they are cheap and with dozens of different brands, there’s lots of scope for finding one that suits your palate.

Oh, and a quick shout-out to Gaijin Tonic, where you might or might not find reviews of some of the fine products listed below.
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Clothes washed daily by over one in three Japanese

About how often do you wash clothes? graph of japanese statisticsThis recent survey from MyVoice looked at the topic of detergents and soaps for washing clothes.

Demographics

Over the first five days of July 2009 15,060 members of the MyVoice internet community successfully completed a private online questionnaire. 54% of the sample were female, 1% in their teens, 14% in their twenties, 36% in their thirties, 30% in their forties, and 19% aged fifty or older.

Q1 is a bit confusing as it doesn’t make clear how husbands should respond, given that I doubt that many married Japanese men actually ever turn on a washing machine. Even I don’t do washing, although at weekends I always help with the hanging out and folding up. Given 46% of the sample being male and 22.6% of the sample not washing clothes themselves, that’s at worst roughly half the men don’t wash clothes. Given that MyVoice’s monitor group’s overall demographics are 55.6% married, then it is probable that the vast majority of the 22.6% on non-washers are husbands, and the rest perhaps children at home, those in dormitories, and those who send everything off to the cleaners. As a translation note, Q1 directly asks about the respondent himself or herself, but Q2 expands to cover the whole family.
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