Worries about Buddhist services

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Which kind of Buddhist matters do you most worry about? graph of japanese statisticsA bit of a curious topic here, a look at worries about Buddhist services, conducted by the graveyard intermediary service, Ohaka no Hikkoshi or Graveyard Moving Service, as one of their services includes moving interred ashes from one location to another.
Having just recently used Buddhist funeral and grave services, fortunately my denomination has a very smooth funeral service, and since my wife’s family has certain connections, we got various free upgrades. I suppose the only worry is the home altar butsudan, as most of them seem to be made of the cheapest veneered chipboard, but priced as if they are chiselled out of the finest virgin ebony.

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One in seven over-sixty Japanese have prepared for their death

Do you know the term 'shuukatsu'? graph of japanese statisticsA word that came into fashion about five or six years ago is 終活, shuukatsu, an abbreviation of the phrase “Activities for one’s end of life”, basically getting one’s finances, will, paperwork, funeral plan, etc all in order while one is still able, so as not to be too much bother for one’s relatives after kicking the bucket. This survey from @nifty looked at this subject, shuukatsu, end of life preparations.

I’ve got my grave prepared – it’s a family plot out in the wilds of Shiga prefecture for myself, my wife, and her parents. Since Japanese funerals are quite expensive, my wishes would be to get everything over and done with with the minimal of fuss and expense. I’ve still got a tonne of paperwork from the UK to sort out though…

At least my place looks prettier than here:

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By 白蛇の騎士白蛇の騎士, GFDL, Link

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Grave concerns in Japan

What is important when selecting a grave? graph of japanese statistics

Excuse the poor pun of a title, but this survey into purchasing and moving graves by the Japan Stone Products Cooperative Association perhaps needed a little bit of levity on this weighty topic.

I’ve got my family plot bought (here’s a web site with a newspaper article on it, along with rather incongruous adverts), or at least it will be mine after 72 easy monthly installments, and perhaps this summer I may be able to take time to go and visit my future home
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One in five middle-aged Japanese want their ashes scattered in the wind

Where would you like to be interred? graph of japanese statisticsHere is a rather interesting survey from Hoken (insurance) Clinic, looking at the diversification of graves and funerals.

Demographics

Over the 4th and 5th of August 2015 500 people, 250 male and 250 female, aged between 40 and 60 years old completed an internet-based questionnaire. There is an implication in Q1 that everyone was married.

In Japan, cremation then interring the ashes in a family grave is the tradition. However, in Q5 an arborium cemetery is currently in vogue; this is usually a small grove of trees (run by the council with no ongoing maintenance fees) with a large underground space for urns. A multi-storey crypt has a visiting room, where on using your ID card, your relative’s urn plus shrine gets delivered to a viewing space. Here is a video of one in operation.
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Secrets to take to the grave

Do you have secrets to take to the grave? graph of japanese statisticsiShare often make me smile with the curious topics they investigate, and this one is no exception, what secrets people want to take to the grave.

Demographics

Between the 3rd and 6th of August 2010 415 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 33.7% in their twenties, 32.8% in their thirties, and 33.5% in their forties.

I’ve probably got one, no two, secrets that I’ll never mention; one is bad, the other is just embarrassing. That’s really about all I’m prepared to say regarding this survey!
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