Japanese kids’ loved and hated fruit and veg

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Today’s survey was a look at children’s liked and disliked fruit and vegetables.

My most hated vegetable as a child, Brussels sprouts, are very much a rarity here in Japan, so I suspect not many children have tasted one, let alone have an opinion on them. I think the most interesting result here is how few children actually have disliked vegetables.

When Inside Out (or Inside Head as it was called here) came out in Japan, a scene featuring broccoli was changed to green peppers, because as you can see below, just one percent of Japanese children admit to green pepper love, versus 18% for broccoli.

Here’s some loved and hated strawberries:

Strawberry People ClubMed Kabira Press Tour
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Fruity favourites

Godzilla Egg watermelon
One of the latest fads in fruit these days seems to be the above “Godzilla’s egg”, an egg-shaped watermelon weighing in at a good few kilograms. As for me, one thing I miss in Japan is a real pear-shaped and pear-flavoured pear, not the watery apple-like thing that is all too common. Melons seem to missing something too, and don’t get me started on other entertainingly-shaped watermelons. However, I can’ t think of a smooth seque into a recent survey conducted by Yahoo! Japan Value Insight (ex infoPLANT) into the subject of fruit.

Demographics

Over the 29th and 30th of June 2007 300 members of the Yahoo! Japan Value Insight internet monitor panel completed an online questionnaire. Exactly 50:50 were male and female, but age groups are not listed, although these sorts of surveys from Value Insight tend to have the numbers in each age group evenly distributed.

You know when you’ve been in Japan too long when you order grapefruitS juice when speaking English.

There were also a few bonus facts added to the report. The full survey was 19 questions long, but just the highlights are in the translated article.

When buying Chuhai (cheap fruit-flavoured alcoholic drinks) rather than price it was flavour that was most important.

The survey was conducted a week after Snapple Peach and Rose Tea went on sale, and 13% were curious about the mix of peach and rose.

About one in three women were interested in buying high-quality fruit juices.

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