IT literacy in Japanese primary schools

Advertisement

Have you ever taught a lesson that used iPads, etc? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey from goo Research, conducted in conjunction with the primary school children-oriented site Kids goo, looked at primary school teachers’ work, and in particular their use of IT, information technology.

Demographics

The sample came from primary school teachers registered with the goo Research online monitor group, and 206 people responded to the survey. Further details, including basic information like when the survey was conducted, was not reported.

Although the sample is quite small, note that it was targeted at elementary school teachers, so the accuracy is perhaps better than a quick look at the numbers would suggest.

I don’t know how computers are used in schools, really, but I do worry that replacing concrete, tangible activities with computer-based ones (if that, indeed, is what is going on) is detrimental to children’s development.

Research results

Q1: What sources do you use for preparing lessons? (Sample size=206, multiple answer)

Books91.7%
Internet80.1%
Practical lessons44.2%
Newspapers31.6%
Television, video18.9%
Other3.9%

Q2: Do you feel a gap between your and your pupils’ computer skills? (Sample size=206)

Pupils are ahead by a wide margin32.0%
Not much gap, but pupils are more skilled24.3%
No gap43.7%

Q3: Which of the following computer skills do you have? (Sample size=206, multiple answer)

Can use mail efficiently86.9%
Can answer questions from students77.7%
Can teach them about online morals62.1%
Can respond to computer problems during lessons61.2%
Other1.9%

Q4: Have you ever had a pupil or parent, guardian discuss internet issues with you? (Sample size=206)

 YesNo
From pupils26.7%73.3%
From parents, guardians15.0%85.0%

Q5: Do you have worries about pupils’ internet use? (Sample size=206)

Yes63.1%
No17.0%
Can’t say19.9%

Q6: What kinds of web sites might you want to use, let your pupils use? (Sample size=206, multiple answer)

Protects children’s safety75.7%
Designed for children73.8%
Information arranged by subject, school grade, etc70.4%
Can trust the site operators61.7%
Widely-known, famous33.0%
Recommended by the Board of Education22.3%
Other1.9%

Q7: Have you ever taught a lesson that used iPads, other tablet computers? (Sample size=206)

Yes7.3%
No92.7%
Read more on: ,,,

Comments (1)

Tennis the best club for meeting people

Today’s fun from goo Ranking is a look at what kinds of lessons people might expect to have a romantic encounter, for both women encountering men and men encountering women.

Demographics

Between the 20th and 22nd of April 2011 1,110 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 60.5% of the sample were female, 10.8% in their teens, 16.2% in their twenties, 27.4% in their thirties, 26.4% in their forties, 9.3% in their fifties, and 9.9% aged sixty or older.

Women put English conversation fourth, although I wonder if they are hoping to meet another student or the teacher?
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

English ability of the next generation

How do you think Japan's English ability will improve with English becoming compulsory for children in 5th and 6th year of elementary school? graph of japanese statisticsWith Japanese primary schools about to start compulsory English lessons, this survey from iShare took a look at people’s English ability and children’s English lessons. As it’s rather a long survey and lends itself into splitting into two, I’ll do just that.

Demographics

Over the 17th and 18th of January 2011 1,722 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service in full-time employment completed a private internet-based survey. 579 people had children of primary school age or younger, 62.0% of the sample were male, 52.2% in their thirties, and 47.8% in their forties.

I recently saw a program where they sent a guy to join an elementary school English class to see how he’d fare. It did seem rather useless, with a native English teacher leading the class in songs and roleplay but a Japanese teacher on hand to command the class. The roleplay feature was that essential skill for life, ordering fast food, with the opening line being a stereotypically Japanese pronunciation of “Harro!”; the kids however seemed to enjoy it and had a relatively good command of the rest of the script.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments (8)

Custom Search

English ability of this generation

How much confidence do you have in your own English ability? graph of japanese statisticsWith Japanese primary schools about to start compulsory English lessons, this survey from iShare took a look at people’s English ability and children’s English lessons. As it’s rather a long survey and lends itself into splitting into two, I’ll do just that.

Demographics

Over the 17th and 18th of January 2011 1,722 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service in full-time employment completed a private internet-based survey. 579 people had children of primary school age or younger, 62.0% of the sample were male, 52.2% in their thirties, and 47.8% in their forties.

Q3 is a funny one to me – I don’t really associate primary school with studying, so I can’t say there is anything academic I should have put more effort into, although I do wish I’d persevered more with music-making as I wish I didn’t have such a tin ear.

My employer requires various levels of TOEIC scores before promotion to higher levels and there is also some indirect input of English skill into a system for rating skill level. Conversely, they have zero requirement for foreigners to speak Japanese, an issue that I regularly take up with personnel.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments (7)

Cool guys study English, horse riding and piano

Even though one large English conversation school went bust last week, learning English still seems to have a high cachet attached to it, if this recent survey from goo Ranking into what people think cool guys study. There is a hint of a follow-up survey into what cute girls are into, so I’ll be sure to translate that later.

Demographics

Between the 23rd and 25th of March 2010 1,128 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.5% of the sample were female, 15.1% in their teens, 16.9% in their twenties, 28.8% in their thirties, 21.1% in their forties, 9.4% in their fifties, and 8.7% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I must say I have zero idea why people answered the way they did. I can maybe agree up to number 7, but then we get bread-making and interior design! Wedding planning and meteorology bamboozle me even further. Finally, it’s interesting that about the most macho activity is karate – I’m wondering if the survey question was actually “What do you think herbivore boys would be studying?”
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

School is a time for forging friendships and learning English

goo Ranking took a look at what people thought it was best to get over and done with during one’s school days.

Demographics

Over the 22nd and 23rd of February 2010 1,123 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 58.6% of the sample were female, 9.6% in their teens, 22.2% in their twenties, 32.1% in their thirties, 24.9% in their forties, 7.5% in their fifties, and 3.8% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

The part-time job is a useful thing to get over and done with at school – I have many interesting memories from working at a petrol station many weekends during school then over the holidays when I was in university.

Going on a foreign holiday is an odd one, but I wonder if that implies a back-packing or other independant travel, unlike the group travel (or no travel at all) that many Japanese tend towards as they get older.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,

Comments

Japanese schoolkids and mobile phones

Do you use your mobile phone in class? graph of japanese statisticsRecently there has been a lot of moral panic (some justified, some unjustified) about schoolkids and their mobile phone usage in Japan, with a number of schools introducing various bans on usage. To find out what kids are up to these days, MacroMill Inc looked at high school students and mobile phones.

Demographics

Between the 15th and 17th of September 2009 300 high school students (therefore aged between 15 and 18) completed a private mobile phone-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female. Note that the sample will be over-represented by heavier mobile phone users, so perhaps the figures here for usage of mobile phones in class, for instance, are higher than they are in reality, or at least I hope that is the case.

As I know there are a few people who teach in Japanese schools amongst my readership, I’d love to hear from you on how the results of this survey fit with your experiences at the chalkface.

I find it quite amazing that more students use their phones in the bath than in class! However, the fact that almost one in six admit to using them regularly in class is a pretty depressing statistic.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Personal learning process in Japan

Here’s a rather interesting survey from goo Research and Keio University’s SFC Research Centre into information sources for the personal learning process.

Demographics

Between the 15th and 18th of May 2009 1,050 members of the goo Research consumer monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.4% of the sample were female, 20.3% in their teens, 19.7% in their twenties, 19.6% in their thirties, 20.2% in their forties, and 20.2% aged fifty or older.

Online lessons with eduFireAs a resident of Japan, one problem I have in the office with officially-sponsored learning is that it is all in Japanese! However, one great way to avoid these language problems at a low cost is provided by the company that Koichi at Tofugu works with as a tutor. The people at eduFire offer low-cost online training in a million and one topics (well, currently at least 27 major ones with lots of sub-topics) through the internet using Skype. One of Koichi’s specialities is Japanese language courses, and from what I’ve seen of his stuff, I can heartily recommend him and have confidence that the rest of the services offered will also be well worth the money. The tutors there are all available for realtime interaction, all just a mouse click away.

It’s not free, but just $29 (2,600 yen or so) gets you a one month unlimited access SuperPass for not just Japanese lessons, but lots of other courses like marketing, Confucius Philosophy, or indeed English, stuff that could cost you hundreds of thousands of yen through traditional routes. For a cheap preview, they also offer one week for one dollar, so you can give it a go with minimal risk. This is cheaper that the free lessons I’ve seen at my regional international centre, once you factor in travelling expenses, as you’re in the classroom right now!

Career stagnation is a problem that many face, so in these tough economic times $29 per month to improve your CV/resume is a cheap way to help yourself out!

Disclosure: What Japan Thinks receives a commission from eduFire for completed sign-ups.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,,

Comments (1) Trackback / Pingback (1)

E-learning awareness and usage in Japan

Have you ever used e-learning? graph of japanese statisticsAs I’ve just recently had a request from work to complete some online training, this recent survey from Marsh Inc and reported on by japan.internet.com into e-learning is quite timely for me.

Demographics

Over the 7th and 8th of January 2009 300 members of the Marsh monitor group completed a private online questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female, 20.0% in their twenties, 20.0% in their thirties, 20.0% in their forties, 20.0% in their fifties, and 20.0% aged sixty or older.

The training I’ve been asked to complete is some stuff on copyright and intellectual property, all in Japanese of course, in some sort of Flash-based presentation that I’ve not tried yet. I once did a similar course with quite nice software that came with full text of all the script, so I could easily cut-and-paste words I didn’t understand into a dictionary. However, the course was ridiculously easy; it just seemed like a way to force you to sit through 10 or 15 hours of lectures, with the implication, of course, that you do it all on your own time, not at work.
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments

Ill-remembered scientific principles in Japan

I’m sure in school and university we all got our fill of scientific laws and principles that we have long-since forgotten bar the names. To see how the Japanese fare on this, goo Ranking performed this survey on remembered names but forgotton details of scientific principles.

Demographics

Between the 24th and 26th of September 2008 1,044 members of the goo Research online monitor panel completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.6% of the sample were male, 5.8% in their teens, 12.7% in their twenties, 32.3% in their thirties, 27.6% in their forties, 12.3% in their fifties, and 9.3% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I’d never heard of the Mpemba effect before, and the first one I could definitely explain is Schrödinger’s Cat. I got Einstein’s theories confused – E=mc2 is special relativity; general relativity is gravity and time dilation. I only managed three others I could recall! How did you get on?
Read the rest of this entry »

Read more on: ,,

Comments (1)

Next entries »