Love of paper keeping Japanese away from ebooks

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Have you ever read an electronic book, magazine? graph of japanese statisticsjapan.internet.com recently reported on goo Research’s ninth regular survey into electronic publications, with the article choosing to highlight the negative side, why people don’t read ebooks.

Demographics

Between the 30th of September and the 3rd of October 2013 1,087 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.7% of the sample were male, 13.8% in their teens, 15.5% in their twenties, 21.8% in their thirties, 17.2% in their forties, 19.6% in their fifties, and 12.1% aged sixty or older.

I’ve got a bunch of free ebooks of Japanese classic novels downloaded from Google Play, but I’m yet to start reading them… I’ve always wanted to get an e-paper reader, although I don’t really know how much I’d actually use it.
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Kindle Book Store easiest to use e-bookshop

Do you know about copyright-free e-books sites? graph of japanese statisticsjapan.internet.com reported on a survey by goo Research into electronic book purchasing sites, although the column chose to highlight free e-book sites.

Demographics

Between the 5th and 10th of April 2013 1,076 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionniare. 53.2% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 18.2% in their twenties, 21.7% in their thirties, 16.1% in their forties, 15.7% in their fifties, and 11.8% aged sixty or older.

A long time ago I downloaded and read two books from Aozora, and I’ve also recently downloaded a couple from Google Books, but I am yet to read them.
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Dedicated electronic book readers still rare in Japan

Have you ever read an electronic book? graph of japanese statisticsgoo Research recently conducted their seventh regular survey into electronic books, which was reported on by japan.internet.com.

Demographics

Over the 25th and 26th of March 2013 1,089 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.9% of the sample were male, 13.4% in their teens, 15.9% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 17.4% in their forties, 19.4% in their fifties, and 12.4% aged sixty or older. Furthermore, the sixth regular survey was conducted between the 10th and 13th of December 2012 and had 1,076 participants with roughly similar demographics.

This post is quite timely as Kobo just announced a retina display-like spec on their new e-ink reader.
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Amazon’s Kindle most desired ebook reader

Have you ever read an electronic novel, magazine? graph of japanese statisticsjapan.internet.com recently reported the results of the fourth regular survey by goo Research into electronic books.

Demographics

Between the 2nd and 5th of July 2012 1,078 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.7% in their teens, 17.4% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 16.1% in their forties, and 28.1% aged fifty or older.

I meant to publish this much earlier, but thanks to my delay an interesting story has blown up regarding Rakuten’s kobo reader. My wife had been asking me if she should buy it, as she was being offered a good members-only price, and I was making positive sounds, but then Rakuten started deleting negative comments, and have now made a press release stating that it’s all fine, just people jumped the gun with the reviews, although to be honest I find that line difficult to believe.
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Electronic books most often browsed by PC, downloaded by feature phone

Have you ever read an electronic book or magazine? graph of japanese statisticsjapan.internet.com reported on the results of the third regular survey by goo Research into electronic books and uncovered some surprising usage patterns.

Demographics

Between the 2nd and 5h of April 2012 1,090 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.6% of the sample were male, 16.3% in their teens, 18.2% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 16.2% in their forties, and 27.7% aged fifty or older.

I’ve read bits and pieces of electronic books online from a PC, and downloaded to a PC and a PDA. I’d like to get a Kindle, although having said that I’ve still got a few paper books lying around that I haven’t got round to reading yet!
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Almost two in five Japanese don’t want to read ebooks

Do you want to read electronic books or magazines? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, was into electronic books and magazines, the second time this regular survey has been conducted.

Demographics

Between the 10th and 13th of January 2011 1,087 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.9% of the sample were male, 16.3% in their teens, 18.2% in their twenties, 21.7% in their thirties, 16.2% in their forties, and 27.6% aged fifty or older.

The article points out that since a lot of people who don’t want to read electronic books pointed out that it was difficult to read from a screen, perhaps the awareness of electronic paper is very low.

In recent related news, Rakuten have announced that they have bought Kobo, a makers of ebook readers, and will be bringing a low-cost reader to market. Up to now they have been offering Panasonic’s catchily-named reader, the UT-PB1, as their platform, but perhaps it has not been selling too well?

My own informal research (ie, looking around on the train) tells me that commuters still prefer paper newspapers or books. I’ve seen one person once with an iPad loaded with the day’s newspaper (just a PDF scan, basically), but when it comes to mobile phones, everyone is either emailing, gaming, or reading SNSes. I’ve only once seen a Kindle.
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Cooking your own books

Have you cooked your own books? (goo Research) graph of japanese statisticsgoo Research, in conjunction with the electronic magazine OnDeck, took a look at cooking your own books, an expression in Japanese which refers to the activity of scanning your books to an electronic format.

Demographics

There were two distinct samples; first, the OnDeck readership was surveyed between the 12th and 20th of September 2011, with 294 people replying, then the goo Research online monitor group was surveyed over the 12th and 13th of October 2011, with 1,063 completing the survey.

As well as doing the scanning yourself at home, there are a number of companies that will do it for you. You send them a box of books, and they will scan them in and return them to you, but only after guillotining off the spine to prevent you reselling the paper editions. This service operates in a bit of a legal black hole – it may be illegal, but no-one has taken a case to court yet, as far as I am aware. Here’s a video of how to do it at home:


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Galapagos eBook reader best-known in Japan

Do you know what electronic books are? graph of japanese statisticsWith the electronic book market beginning to heat up in Japan, this recent survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, into electronic books and electronic book sellers found that the recent announcements from Sharp and Sony were fresh in many people’s minds.

Demographics

Between the 15th and 19th of December 2010 1,079 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.5% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 18.0% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 16.3% in their forties, 15.6% in their fifties, and 12.0% aged sixty or older.

I’ve never heard of the Kobo, although it seems to be Canadian rather than the seemingly Japanese name it has.

Furthermore, I of course knew about Amazon selling e-books, but I’d never heard of the rest.

Everything I hear about the Kindle sounds good, and if I did slightly more travelling (or slightly less blogging!) I’d buy one. If the Japanese ones have managed to get a lot of publishers on board, and if the price of individual volumes is cheaper than the paper versions, I’d be inclined to get one for the wife, just so we could tidy up a lot of the clutter of books!
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Computerised comic contents consumed capriciously

A recent survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, looked at electronic books.

Demographics

Between the 26th of October and the 1st of November 2010 1,097 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.6% of the sample were male, 16.6% in their teens, 18.2% in their twenties, 21.2% in their thirties, 16.4% in their forties, 15.6% in their fifties, and 11.9% aged sixty or older.

Manga comics are probably ideally suited to being digitised – with them only taking an hour or two to read, the amount of effort required to buy and store electronic versions is far less than that for paper versions, I would imagine.
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Aozora and electronic books in general in Japan

Do you what an electronic book is? graph of japanese statisticsIf you’re a learner of Japanese, or just wanting to get hold of classics of Japanese literature, the free repository Aozora is a good place to start, but judging by this survey from goo Research and reported on by japan.internet.com into Aozora, it’s not that well-known.

Demographics

Over the 19th and 20th of August 2010 1,080 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.15 in their teens, 18.2% in their twenties, 21.9% in their thirties, 16.3% in their forties, 15.5% in their fifties, and 11.9% aged sixty or older.

Despite having said that everybody should read stuff off Aozora, I’ve read a grand total of one book from there. My excuse is that I don’t have a decent e-book reader; however there must be a decent solution for Japanese feature phones which I ought really to investigate!
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