3 in 5 users trust their earthquake early warning apps

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How reliable is your earthquake early warning application? graph of japanese statisticsWith the first anniversary of the East Japan Great Earthquake Disaster approaching, with various predictions of Tokyo being due a Big One, and with smartphones now supporting earthquake early warnings straight out of the box, I would think that the awareness of such early warning systems should be high, but the article from japan.internet.com on a survey by goo Research into earthquake early warning applications didn’t report that figure, unfortunately.

Demographics

Between the 23rd and 25th of February 2012 1,066 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.8% of the sample were male, 16.0% in their teens, 17.7% in their twenties, 21.4% in their thirties, 16.6% in their forties, 16.1% in their fifties, and 12.1% aged sixty or older.

The app that I most hear people talking about is yurekuru for the iPhone. Fortunately, down here in Kansai there have been few significant shakers recently so I’ve never heard the alerts personally, but I read about many Tokyo residents who talk about whole roomfuls of people’s smartphones going off at the same time – there must be a YouTube video, and indeed there is, but just of a single phone:


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Mineral water for infants after the earthquake: part 2 of 2

Do you know which is the appropriate water for formula milk? graph of japanese statisticsSince the Fukushima Dai-ichi meltdown, one of the problems occuring has been the worries about radioactive particles in the tap water (I’d argue that the worries exceed the actual danger), so it was interesting to see this survey from iShare into drinking water for infants.

Demographics

On the 13th of June 2011 576 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 63.9% of the sample were female, 11.8% in their twenties, 80.6% in their thirties, and 7.6% in their forties. All of the sample lived in Tokyo prefecture and had bought mineral water for infants.

The one or two times I’ve been in Tokyo, however, I don’t think I’ve actually drunk the water, so I cannot say how nice or otherwise it is.

In Q7SQ, I never knew there was a recommended water for formula milk! Soft water is apparently the correct answer, and most of the water in Japan is soft. Q10 and Q10SQ shows just over three in four women with infants worry about Fukushima fallout in their water – do is that a larger or smaller percentage than you would imagine?

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Mineral water for infants after the earthquake: part 1 of 2

Since the earthquake, have you stocked up mineral water? graph of japanese statisticsSince the Fukushima Dai-ichi meltdown, one of the problems occuring has been the worries about radioactive particles in the tap water (I’d argue that the worries exceed the actual danger), so it was interesting to see this survey from iShare into drinking water for infants.

Demographics

On the 13th of June 2011 576 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 63.9% of the sample were female, 11.8% in their twenties, 80.6% in their thirties, and 7.6% in their forties. All of the sample lived in Tokyo prefecture and had bought mineral water for infants.

For Q2, people were asked why they had stocked up on water since the earthquake, some of the more common answers were that they wanted to have a supply if the tap water became contaminated, they don’t want their children to drink tap water, they stocked up just in case, and domestic water is safer than imported brands. That final option does seem a bit odd to me.
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Living smart post-earthquake

Since the earthquake, have you started living smart? graph of japanese statisticsSince the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake Disaster on March 11th, even people outside the immediate disaster area have felt aftershocks in their daily life. This survey from iShare looked at how one’s lifestyle has changed post-earthquake.

Demographics

Over the 9th and 10th of June 2011 1,223 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 51.3% of the sample were male, 9.3% in their twenties, 45.5% in their thirties, and 45.1% in their forties. All of the sample lived in either Tokyo, Osaka, or Aichi (Nagoya area) prefecture.

I don’t think I’ve really done anything special since the earthquake, bar buying a new fan, but that was more due to the general high price of electricity bills than due to any specific awareness of reducing power consumption as requested by the local electricity board.
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How the earthquake changed Japanese values

How much did you donate to earthquake relief, etc? graph of japanese statisticsgoo Research published another interesting look at earthquake-related changes in society, this time support for the disaster-hit areas and changes in values.

Demographics

Between the 22nd and 27th of April 2011 1,000 members of the goo Research monitor panel from all areas of Japan except those directly affected by the earthquake and tsunami completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female, and 20.0% of the sample were in their twenties, 20.0% in their thirties, 20.0% in their forties, 20.0% in their fifties, and 20.0% aged sixty or older.

In Q3, probably the thing I’ve most become aware of is who supplies information, in particular the dreadful job much of the foreign English-language press made of reporting on Fukushima specifically.
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Vast majority find government slow, untrustworthy on Fukushima

How trustworthy is the government's Fukushima-related information? graph of japanese statisticsWith almost every day bringing a new revelation about how TEPCO failed to release data in a timely manner, and how the government is trying to protect TEPCO or itself rather than kicking ass and taking names, this survey from iShare into nuclear-related information from the government found that not surprisingly, many, many people are dissatisfied.

Demographics

On the 15th of April 2011 1,193 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.3% of the sample were male, 8.9% in their twenties, 45.7% in their thirties, and 45.4% in their forties. People from the disaster-affected areas were not surveyed.

Note that this survey was conducted over a month ago, and I suspect if it were repeated today the figures would be even further down the scales of trust and speed, as this week we have finally had official notification that there was a meltdown, despite all evidence pointing towards some degree of fuel rod melting and two months of most commentators agreeing that there had been.
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Confirming one’s safety online

Would you use web services in emergencies? graph of japanese statisticsiShare’s latest look at issues surrounding the earthquake on March 11th was at usage of web services in times of emergency.

Demographics

On the 15th of April 2011 1,193 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 42.3% of the sample were male, 8.9% in their twenties, 45.7% in their thirties, and 45.4% in their forties.

I confirmed my safety first via email to my parents, then by blog. Although I didn’t directly post to any social web service, my blog posts automatically end up on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn so I suppose technically I did use such a web service as asked by Q1 and Q1SQ.

The last time there was a disaster was the derailment of the JR train at Amagasaki, on the line I used then, but that time my parents confirmed my safety via a post I made that got published on the BBC news web site.
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Majority of workers not feeling adverse economic effects of earthquake

Have you a forecast for when the adverse ecomonic effects will lessen? graph of japanese statisticsI don’t know if it’s all part of the mood of self-restraint or economising since the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake Disaster, but the two main survey sources I use have been printing shorter than usual surveys, which means I’m seeing an economic effect of the recent earthquake, which was also the subject of a recent survey by iShare.

Demographics

Between the 8th and 11th of April 2011 761 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service employed either full-time or part-time or self-employed completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 59.1% of the sample were male, 2.1% were in their twenties, 45.5% were in their thirties, and 52.4% in their forties. Due to iShare making an error in reporting the male-female ratio, I can deduce that the original sample was 922 people, so 161 people, or 17.5% of the original sample were either unemployed, in casual work, or full-time homemakers.

I’m very surprised that only the minority have seen adverse effects, as it seems that almost all businesses are being affected to some extent by the mood of self-restraint, or even just simply breaks in the supply chain due to upstream or downstream companies being directly affected by the earthquake or tsunami.

However, my own workplace has had no direct adverse effects, but I suppose working in research and development we don’t have any real customers.
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End of last month’s power cuts welcomed, more summer cuts opposed

What do you think about more scheduled power cuts in summer? graph of japanese statisticsThis time it is iShare taking a look at scheduled power cuts, finding that not surprisingly, most people were glad to get back to regular power, but a lower than I might have thought majority were opposed to them restarting in the summer.

Demographics

Between the 8th and 11th of April 2011 922 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.7% of the sample were male, 2.3% in their twenties, 45.0% in their thirties, and 52/7% in their forties.

If this summer is as hot as last summer, and last summer’s power consumption patterns are repeated, the Tokyo area will be short about 1 gigawatt of power generation capability. However, there are a lot of moves afoot, such as vending machines cutting their refrigeration to consume about 30% less power, pachinko parlours shutting down their neon signs, and companies everywhere getting rid of unnecessary lighting, although from the images I’ve seen on TV it does seem a bit excessive, such as cinemas turning off the lighting on street-level posters (perhaps A2 in size?), making it look as if they are actually shut, all for a less than a kilowatt saved.
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DIMSDRIVE Research on the earthquake

Is your home within a scheduled power cut area? graph of japanese statisticsDIMSDRIVE Research are the latest company to publish the results of their survey into The Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster.

Demographics

Between the 25th and 28th of March 2011 9,948 members of the DIMSDRIVE Research monitor group completed a private online questionnaire. 56.4% of the sample were male, 0.6% in their teens, 6.5% in their twenties, 23.5% in their thirties, 33.7% in their forties, 21.4% in their fifties, and 14.3% aged sixty or older.

There are a number of questions related to power cuts; however, since the survey was conducted TEPCO has announced that they have got the power supply situation under control, and there will be no more scheduled power cuts, although we just have to wait and see what the summer will hold for us.

Although I’m far away from the affected area, getting hold of water was the biggest problem. Almost all the bottled water was sold out, barring the fizzy stuff like Perrier. I don’t eat pot noodles and only the very occasional boil-in-the-bag curry, but these also disappeared off the shelves in a flash. Currently the biggest problem is that many yoghurt factories have been knocked out, but fortunately our nearest supermarket has a brand from the local area, a really rich and creamy one that will be replacing our previous more expensive mass-produced brand.
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