Majority of Japanese kids have dinner without father

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The free infant care magazine miku recently published a survey titled preventing second-hand smoke, although most of the survey was actually about mealtimes.

This summer I’d be in the “other” category for breakfast. I’m usually toast in winter, cereal in summer, but this year I’m on energy bars.

Here’s a typical traditional Japanese breakfast, although this typical of what is served at traditional inns; I don’t know how many of the 40% who eat rice-centric breakfasts actually eat something as grand as this:

手作りの豆腐や, 天日干しの網代干物, 定番の温泉卵, 朝食, リーズナブル 舟盛プラン, 磯の宿 まきた, 磯の宿, 熱海温泉, 熱海, 日本, Breakfast, Atami, Japan
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Few Japanese children learning dance, street most popular

From 2012 dance became a compulsory part of the curriculum in Japanese schools, so Yamaha Music Japan decided to conduct a survey into awareness of dance to see how dance was fitting in to a child’s education.

Demographics

Between the 30th of September and 1st of October 2015 1,000 parents, 50:50 male and female, aged between 25 and 60 years old and with a child in primary school (aged between 6 and 12) completed an internet-based survey. How the sample was chosen is not noted.

Back when I was in primary school, we had a few lessons in traditional Scottish Country dance that stood me in good stead for céilidhs later on in life; nothing serious, just the steps for the Gay Gordons and the like. Now I think of it, Japanese traditional dances don’t feature in the answers – are they already taught elsewhere in the curriculum?

Here’s a kiddy version of my favourite dance troupe, World Order:


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Archetypes of primary school love

goo Ranking’s survey for today is a look at what images people hold of common primary (elementary) school love.

Demographics

Between the 31st of May and 3rd of June 2013 1,069 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.1% of the sample were female, 24.8% in their teens, 24.9% in their twenties, 25.0% in their thirties, and 25.4% in their forties; there was no-one older than 49 in this sample. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

Children

This is the sort of topic that I feel uncomfortable with. I don’t remember much from my primary school days, but girls never really featured as anything significant until perhaps the last year, yet watching the television in Japan they ask even kindergarten children about who they fancy in their class. Maybe I just came from a strange part of Scotland, or maybe I was as blissfully ignorant as I am today. Both these have a high probability of being true…
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Mothers and their children and the internet

I worry what children are looking at, doing on the internet graph of japanese statisticsjapan.internet.com recently reported on a survey by Video Research Ltd. into characters and the child market. More detailed information was also obtained from Video Research’s own press release.

Demographics

Between the 3rd and 9th of December 2012 617 female members of the Video Research monitor group who lived with a child aged between 3 and 12 years old, and who lived within a 30 km radius of Tokyo station.

It’s an interesting set of results, and I wonder how the one in three or so children (in this sample of internet-using parents) who view or download music and video will approach copyright when they grow up? Will media be something to be valued or just another basic human need that they expect to have on tap all the time? How will they consume television? Will they even consume television?
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How Japanese spent their summer holidays as kids

The final summer holiday-themed survey for today is a look at what tough summer holiday experiences Japanese had as children.

Demographics

Over the 6th and 7th of June 2011 1,148 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 50.6% of the sample were male, 12.1% in their teens, 16.9% in their twenties, 28.0% in their thirties, 25.4% in their forties, 9.7% in their fifties, and 7.9% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I did spend all summer in hospital one year, and another year after playing on the beach the result of our play (undermining a sand dune then breaking the turf on top – I’m sure there was a good reason for it) featured on the front page of the local paper as an example of coastal erosion…
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What Japanese wanted to be when they grew up

Here’s a fun wee survey from goo Ranking, looking at the top ten jobs that Japanese wanted to do when they were a child, for both boys and girls.

Demographics

Over the 24th and 24th of May 2011 1,085 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.5% of the sample were male, 11.0% in their teens, 15.3% in their twenties, 27.5% in their thirties, 25.1% in their forties, 12.6% in their fifties, and 8.6% aged sixty or older. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I’m actually surprised by the results being a bit more adult that when I was a kid. Doctors, football players, pilots and spacemen was as far as we got, none of this author business or translators or diplomats. However, I do suspect there is a little bit of selective memory going on, as there are no train drivers for the boys.

When my brother was in the last year at primary school, I think it was, he wrote an essay on what he wanted to be; a dog eutheniser at the police pound.
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Mineral water for infants after the earthquake: part 2 of 2

Do you know which is the appropriate water for formula milk? graph of japanese statisticsSince the Fukushima Dai-ichi meltdown, one of the problems occuring has been the worries about radioactive particles in the tap water (I’d argue that the worries exceed the actual danger), so it was interesting to see this survey from iShare into drinking water for infants.

Demographics

On the 13th of June 2011 576 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 63.9% of the sample were female, 11.8% in their twenties, 80.6% in their thirties, and 7.6% in their forties. All of the sample lived in Tokyo prefecture and had bought mineral water for infants.

The one or two times I’ve been in Tokyo, however, I don’t think I’ve actually drunk the water, so I cannot say how nice or otherwise it is.

In Q7SQ, I never knew there was a recommended water for formula milk! Soft water is apparently the correct answer, and most of the water in Japan is soft. Q10 and Q10SQ shows just over three in four women with infants worry about Fukushima fallout in their water – do is that a larger or smaller percentage than you would imagine?

75% of Tokyo women with infants worrying about radioactive water is...

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Mineral water for infants after the earthquake: part 1 of 2

Since the earthquake, have you stocked up mineral water? graph of japanese statisticsSince the Fukushima Dai-ichi meltdown, one of the problems occuring has been the worries about radioactive particles in the tap water (I’d argue that the worries exceed the actual danger), so it was interesting to see this survey from iShare into drinking water for infants.

Demographics

On the 13th of June 2011 576 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 63.9% of the sample were female, 11.8% in their twenties, 80.6% in their thirties, and 7.6% in their forties. All of the sample lived in Tokyo prefecture and had bought mineral water for infants.

For Q2, people were asked why they had stocked up on water since the earthquake, some of the more common answers were that they wanted to have a supply if the tap water became contaminated, they don’t want their children to drink tap water, they stocked up just in case, and domestic water is safer than imported brands. That final option does seem a bit odd to me.
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