Japan last for police trust and legitimacy

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Central Research Services Inc recently published a survey looking at victims of crime, etc in Japan, and comparing it with similar surveys from Europe.

Demographics

In 2011 2,000 people over the age of 15 were randomly selected from resident registers to take part in the survey. At the end of May all bar those from two sampling points in Tohoku that were affected by the earthquake were interviewed face-to-face, and the remaining people were interviewed at the end of July. In total 1,251 responded to the questionnaire, with 50.5% of the sample female and 49.5% male. The age breakdown was not given.

These are really very surprising figures for me! I didn’t expect Japan to be so low on police legitimacy, for one thing. Recently there has been a spate of reports of police uselessness when responding to crimes, miscarriages of justice, etc which would have influenced public distrust of the overall criminal justice system, but questions on direct interactions with the system would suggest that even the average bobby on the beat is a bit bent.

Note that the European data was taken from European Social Survey, 2009, “Trust in Justice: European Social Survey”.
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Ichiro still Japan’s favourite sportsperson

A recent survey from Central Research Service Inc looked at popular sports, their 19th such annual survey, which found much to my surprise that sumo had lost little of its popularity despite the match-fixing scandal.

Demographics

Between the 7th and 18th of July 2011 4,000 adult members of the public were randomly selected, and 1,269 of them, or 31.7%, agreed to answer the questionnaire in face-to-face interviews. More specific demographic information was not provided.

I haven’t a clue of the name of my favourite some wrestler – let me look it up – ah yes, Takanoyama (High/Proud Mountain). He became my favourite when I saw him competing at the recent basho and took pity on the wee diddy.

See more about him here.
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Japanese still trust power companies, just

Continuing the surveys into nuclear power, this one from Central Research Services looks at the earthquake and power companies.

Demographics

First, 3,954 people over the age of twenty were selected at random from voters polls, but the samples were weighted by size of each of the electricity generating companies’ customer base. These 3,954 were approached for face-to-face interviews between the 13th and 22nd of May 2011, and 1,308 people, or 33.1%, actually completed the survey. 54.1% of the sample were female, 11.4% in their twenties, 18.7% in their thirties, 15.7% in their forties, 16.8% in their fifties, 18.3% in their sixties, and 19.7% aged seventy or older.

I’m surprised that the level of trust just manages to pass the average point even now, especially in the earthquake-affected area, and given the much lower safety rating of nuclear power generation. Perhaps they have been very quick to repair powerlines and restore services to affected areas?
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Nuclear power now and 10 years hence

How do you see the global warming issue in ten years time? graph of japanese statisticsActually, this survey would be more accurately headlined “Nuclear power last year and 9 years hence” as it was conducted last September, well before everything went all pear-shaped in Fukushima. The official title for this survey from Central Research Service Inc was the environment and energy problems.

Demographics

At some point in September 2010, 3,000 people over the age of twenty selected at random from the Kansai prefectures of Osaka, Kyoto, Hyogo, Nara, Wakayama and Shiga and 1,500 people from Fukui prefecture (where all Kansai’s nuclear reactors are situated) were sent a survey by post. 1,082 people from Kansai (36%) and 569 (38%) from Fukui returned the completed survey. A breakdown by age and sex was not reported.

I’ve previously reported on a similar survey by the same company into nuclear power in Kansai, which may serve as a useful cross-reference.
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Nuke plants needed but significant safety worries abound

Do you think nuclear power is needed? graph of japanese statisticsOne thing that I have always considered a bit of a dichotomy in Japan has been the overwhelming anti-nuclear weapon stance of the general public (hmm, I don’t actually have a survey on that, so I hope I’m correct!) versus the seemingly quiet acceptance of nuclear power. This recent survey from Central Research Services Inc looked at the second half of the above statement. The survey was entitled living and the environment, so the below is just one part of the survey.

Demographics

During October 2008 (CRS are always slow to publish their survey results!) 4,500 adults were selected at random, 3,000 from the Kinki (also known as Kansai) area of Japan, namely the prefectures of Shiga, Kyoto, Osaka, Hyogo, Nara and Wakayama, and 1,500 from Fukui, a prefecture that hosts all of the nuclear powerstations that generate the electricity for the region. From the 3,000 people selected from Kinki, 1,031, or 34% responded; in Fukui 551 from 1,500 responded, for a response rate of 37%.

The “Is nuclear power needed?” question is a difficult one to decipher, and the text doesn’t suggest any refinement to it. Given that Kinki’s main electricity generator KEPCO (Kansai Electric Power Co) generates 60% of its power from nuclear, it is very much required, so a negative answer is not a realistic position. However, if the question is more slanted towards “Is more needed?” or “Should alternatives be found and existing facilities decommissioned?”, that goes some way to explaining the 20% opposition. Here is an article on Kinki power.
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Booze and fags and Japanese kids

Under-age drinkingRather than just another survey on consumer interests, here’s something a bit different, a look at recent trends in smoking and drinking rates amongst Japanese schoolchildren. The multiple surveys were conducted and analysed by Central Research Services.

Demographics

I only have concrete demographics for the 1996 and 2000 surveys; both surveys asked students at about 70 to 90 junior and senior high schools, getting over 100,000 replies both times, representing over 60% of the students enrolled in each institution.

The remarkable drop in smoking and drinking rates is quite surprising, and I must admit to being a bit skeptical about the results on first reading. However, the survey report referenced a paper entitled Decrease in the prevalence of smoking among Japanese adolescents and its possible causes: periodic nationwide cross-sectional surveys (English) that tried to explain the huge drop. Their conculsion is as stunning as the statistics themselves – more schoolchildren have no friends, thus no peer pressure to indulge in such underage vices.

Photo from Don’t fry leeks,please on flickr.
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Smoking rates in Japan

How many cigarettes do you smoke per day? graph of japanese statisticsFollowing up, in a way, on Saturday’s look at the taspo card, let’s look at smoking in Japan, according to a survey conducted by Central Research Services, Inc.

Demographics

2,000 people aged twenty or over were randomly selected to take part in this survey. 1,328 people of those selected took part in face-to-face interviews between the 6th and 9th of June 2008. Further demographic information was not provided. This was the 22nd time the survey has been conducted; the previous ones were in 1978, 1983, and every year since 1987.

Notice in Q1 there has been a slight rise in smoking rates. Unfortunately no historical information is provided for the demographic breakdown, so it’s difficult to see where the rise is coming from – is it more new smokers, or less people quitting? Is the problem under-age smokers getting addicted, or adults choosing to start?

Q4, giving the numbers bothered by smoking, is a bit difficult to interpret, as both smokers and non-smokers answered.
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Gambling in Japan

Have you gambled this last year? graph of japanese opinionCentral Research Services recently published a survey on a topic I’ve been keen to find a survey on, namely gambling. I’d still like to find a more detailed survey, especially to see if lottery scratch-card addiction is an issue, as the promotion of them on television is extremely irresponsible in my opinion.

Demographics

Between the 7th and 10th of July 2006 (CRS are always slow to report their surveys!) they conducted face-to-face interviewed with 2,000 randomly selected individuals from all over the country. 1,379 successful responses were obtained.

This topic covered legal gambling in Japan, namely horses, boats, cars, lottery, football pools, and of course pachinko and slot machines. Stuff like internet gambling or holidays to Las Vegas were outside of the scope of this survey.

I’ve only indirectly gambled in Japan, due to someone giving me a year-end lottery ticket. I’d love to visit a Pachinko Parlour sometime, but I’m scared to go as I fear I’d either go deaf or inhale far too much second-hand smoke!

However, the Pachinko advertisements on television are often rather interesting. Thanks to Japander for uploading!


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Mobiles and internet up, magazine and books down

How often do you read a newspaper? graph of japanese opinionCentral Research Services Inc recently reported on a survey into media consumption in 2005. The survey itself was conducted back in October 2005, and although detailed demographics are not available, the sample was randomly selected from residents up and down the country aged between 15 and 69, and conducted by means of face-to-face interviews. The response rate was 57.4%, giving a raw sample size of 3,443 people.

I don’t think this survey teaches us much that intuition suggests to be true, but it’s always interesting to get these hunches backed up by raw data. However, although almost three-quarters read a paper every day, how much they actually read versus just headline skimming is another question that hasn’t been asked here.

Q3 is a rather weird question – perhaps it’s to see if people start with the news or the sports. The tabloids have sports on the back page, but the broadsheets usually have the television listings, then the sports from the second-last page, so I don’t know how that affected the answers.
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A pet is just for Christmas, not for life

Aria, an American Short Hair cat, looking upOver four days in early March (sorry, but they are always slow to report) Central Research Services, Inc carried out a survey on views on pets. 2,000 people throughout the country aged 20 or over were randomly selected for face-to-face interviews; just over two-thirds, or 1,341 agreed to participate. The same questions had also been asked in other surveys carried out in 1999, 2000, 2002 and 2005.

Pet ownership is yet another of the facets of Japanese society that we foreigners find hard to understand. Whilst this survey does highlight some of the things that seem strange to me, sadly it does not explain them. In reference to the headline, a few years ago there was a huge boom in Chiuwawa sales thanks mostly to a series of adverts for high interest loans, with some other adverts following suit. One that particularly sticks in my mind was for a product I forgot, but the daughter was moving out to her own place, and you saw her coming in with her newly-bought puppy only to find the parents already waiting with another one. Oh, how they laughed!
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