Two-thirds of Japanese open to robo-nursing

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Would you want to be cared for by a Care Robot? graph of japanese statisticsThe Cabinet Office of Japan recengtly conducted a survey looking at care robots.

Demographics

Between the 1st and 11th of August 2013 3,000 members of the public with Japanese nationality were randomly selected. 1,842 of them (61.4%) chose to answer the questionnaire at face-to-face interviews. Further demographic breakdown was not provided.

Before you get the idea of robo-nurses into your head, as can be seen in the preamble to Q4 it is more just technology to assist the carer and the cared-for rather than the science-fiction image of autonomous androids tending to their human wards.
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Illegal immigrants no longer a major public order threat

Do you think Japan currently has good public order and is a safe and secure country to live in? graph of japanese statisticsA recent Cabinet Office Japan survey into public order, much to my surprise found that the populace no longer pinned the blame for Japan’s ills on foreigners, even when compared to the same survey three and six years ago.

Demographics

Between the 5th and 15th of July 2012 3,000 randomly-selected Japanese citizens were selected from resident rolls and approached for face-to-face interviews. 1,956 people agreed to take part, but a further demographic breakdown was not provided.

I’m not really sure why the figures for fear of foreigners have changes so dramatically for the better in the last six years, and I’m not sure how I would go about finding out the reason behind it. However, it does also seem clear that the new bogeyman is Reefer Madness, especially as round about the time of the survey there was no end of stories about a current social problem of legal highs, dubious cannabinoid derivatives sold as incence in a multitude of shops in Japan’s big cities.
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The North Korean abduction issue

Do you know about the abduction of Japanese by North Korea issue? graph of japanese statisticsIf there’s one subject that gets many foreigner eyeballs rolling, it’s the ongoing saga of the North Korean abduction issue, where about 20 or more years ago a number of Japanese nationals (and other nationals) were abducted by agents of North Korea, a subject kept alive by many politicians for political ends, as this survey from the Cabinet Office Japan perhaps demonstrates.

Demographics

Between the 7th and 17th of June 2012, 3,000 Japanese citizens aged 20 or older were selected at random from residency records were approached for face to face interviews. 1,912 people chose to answer the questions, but more detailed demographics were not provided. Note that this is the first time that selection method in these Cabinet Office surveys have mentioned that it is citizens; up until now it has just said people over 20, but since foreigners have recently been added to the main registry system, and that registry is used as the source for the random sampling, I presume they have decided to add the extra qualification.

There’s a number of reasons why North Korean abductions induce eye-rolling. For my part, it’s a combination of it being raised to such a level as appearing to sticking a spoke in the wheel of the six country talks on the DPRK, that the Koreans have said themselves that they consider the matter finalised, and by the most likely reality that the remaining missing people are dead. There’s also victims of international divorces gone bad who bring up the dissonance between Japan’s response to child abductions and North Korean abductions.

Note that the blue flag that the Prime Minister and other politicians wear is their yellow ribbon for the abductees.
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Lifestyles of the Japanese (2011 version): part 3 of 3

What is the objective of work to you? Work is to... graph of japanese statistics[part 1][part 2][part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently released the results of a survey they conducted into citizens’ lifestyles. I translated a survey on the same topic in 2009, 2007, and 2005, if you wish to cross-reference.

Demographics

Between the 13th of October and the 6th of November 2011 10,000 members of the public who were randomly selected from resident registers were approached for interview. Of that number, 6,212 people actually took part in the survey, conducted by means of face-to-face interviews. 53.9% of the sample were female, 8.7% in their twenties, 13.9% in their thirties, 17.2% in their forties, 15.8% in their fifties, 21.7% in their sixties, 16.5% in their seventies, and 6.1% aged eighty or older. Furthermore 71.7% of the sample were married, 13.0% divorced or widowed, 15.1% unmarried, and 0.2% did not answer. Additionally, 77.9% had children, including those that were adults or not living with them. Although 34.5% said they used the internet from a computer almost every day and 39.0% used the internet from mobile devices almost every day, there was also 45.2% and 42.8% who never used it at all from computers and from mobile devices respectively.

In Q18 it is interesting that 28.0% say that they now pay attention in the safety aspect of food. Looking at the detailed breakdown by age, sex and area where people live, we can see that…
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Lifestyles of the Japanese (2011 version): part 2 of 3

How do you think your home life will change in the future? graph of japanese statistics[part 1][part 2][part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently released the results of a survey they conducted into citizens’ lifestyles. I translated a survey on the same topic in 2009, 2007, and 2005, if you wish to cross-reference.

Demographics

Between the 13th of October and the 6th of November 2011 10,000 members of the public who were randomly selected from resident registers were approached for interview. Of that number, 6,212 people actually took part in the survey, conducted by means of face-to-face interviews. 53.9% of the sample were female, 8.7% in their twenties, 13.9% in their thirties, 17.2% in their forties, 15.8% in their fifties, 21.7% in their sixties, 16.5% in their seventies, and 6.1% aged eighty or older. Furthermore 71.7% of the sample were married, 13.0% divorced or widowed, 15.1% unmarried, and 0.2% did not answer. Additionally, 77.9% had children, including those that were adults or not living with them. Although 34.5% said they used the internet from a computer almost every day and 39.0% used the internet from mobile devices almost every day, there was also 45.2% and 42.8% who never used it at all from computers and from mobile devices respectively.

Having said in part one that people seem more satisfied than I would have thought, there is definite pessimism when it comes to the future, a feeling that I share, as do other foreigners.
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Lifestyles of the Japanese (2011 version): part 1 of 3

Overall, how satisfied are you with your current lifestyle? graph of japanese statistics[part 1][part 2][part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently released the results of a survey they conducted into citizens’ lifestyles. I translated a survey on the same topic in 2007, and 2005, if you wish to cross-reference.

Demographics

Between the 13th of October and the 6th of November 2011 10,000 members of the public who were randomly selected from resident registers were approached for interview. Of that number, 6,212 people actually took part in the survey, conducted by means of face-to-face interviews. 53.9% of the sample were female, 8.7% in their twenties, 13.9% in their thirties, 17.2% in their forties, 15.8% in their fifties, 21.7% in their sixties, 16.5% in their seventies, and 6.1% aged eighty or older. Furthermore 71.7% of the sample were married, 13.0% divorced or widowed, 15.1% unmarried, and 0.2% did not answer. Additionally, 77.9% had children, including those that were adults or not living with them. Although 34.5% said they used the internet from a computer almost every day and 39.0% used the internet from mobile devices almost every day, there was also 45.2% and 42.8% who never used it at all from computers and from mobile devices respectively.

There seems a high level of general satisfaction with their current lifestyles, which goes against the typical foreigner’s (or perhaps I hang out in the wrong neighbourhood?) perception of the miserable wage slave slogging his life away on pointless work. Perhaps the true answer is a mix of the two images; or perhaps it is my bias, the average worker is accepting of his lot.
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Diplomacy in Japan in 2011: part 2 of 2

What should Japan do regarding overseas economic aid? graph of japanese statisticsThe Cabinet Office Japan recently conducted a detailed survey into diplomacy, a topic they revisit about once every two years or so.

Demographics

Between the 29th of September and the 16th of October 2011, 3,000 people aged twenty or older were randomly selected from residency registers were approached for one-to-one interiews. Of the 3,000, 1,912 people, or 63.7% were resident at the adress and willing to answer the questions. 52.5% of the sample were female, 8.2% in their twenties, 14.7% in their thirties, 14.8% int heir forties, 16.6% in their fifties, 22.8% in their sixties, and 22.8% aged seventy or older. 44.4% were employed, 9.8% were self-employed, 2.9% worked in a family business, and 42.9% were one of full-time homekeepers, students, unemployed, or retired.

The second half looked at actual diplomatic strategy. I was suprised to see a vast majority favouring maintaining or increasing current UN PKO activities. In calmer areas they can contribute, but I’m not really sure how Japan’s Self Defence Forces would react if there is shooting involved, and with recent talk about dispatch to South Sudan, I feel that they’d just get in the way. I remember in Iraq how they needed another country’s army to form a buffer between them and any potential threats.
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Diplomacy in Japan in 2011: part 1 of 2

Do you have friendly feelings towards China? graph of japanese statisticsThe Cabinet Office Japan recently conducted a detailed survey into diplomacy, a topic they revisit about once every two years or so.

Demographics

Between the 29th of September and the 16th of October 2011, 3,000 people aged twenty or older were randomly selected from residency registers were approached for one-to-one interiews. Of the 3,000, 1,912 people, or 63.7% were resident at the adress and willing to answer the questions. 52.5% of the sample were female, 8.2% in their twenties, 14.7% in their thirties, 14.8% int heir forties, 16.6% in their fifties, 22.8% in their sixties, and 22.8% aged seventy or older. 44.4% were employed, 9.8% were self-employed, 2.9% worked in a family business, and 42.9% were one of full-time homekeepers, students, unemployed, or retired.

This survey was reported on last week in the papers, but the English translations seemed to focus mostly on the relationship between the USA and Japan; the level of relationships with Japan’s Asian neighbours is a much more interesting statistic, however.
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Japanese society in 2011: part 3 of 3

Overall, are you satisfied or dissatisfied with today's public services? graph of japanese statistics[part 1] [part 2] [part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently carried out a survey into society.

Demographics

Between the 20th of January and the 6th of February 2011 10,000 people aged 20 or older selected at random from residency registers from all over the country were approached for interview and 6,338 people agreed to a face-to-face interview. 53.8% of the sample were female, 7.9% in their twenties, 14.0% in their thirties, 16.6% in their forties, 17.2% in their fifties, 23.4% in their sixties, 15.7% in their seventies, and 5.4% aged eighty or older.

Comparing the results of Q18 with the same question in a previous survey from 2008 (see Q15), one item going downhill fast is diplomacy – 22.7% in 2008 to 46.3% this year – which is most likely a result of the Senkaku Islands incident.
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Japanese society in 2011: part 2 of 3

How often do you interact with people in your neighbourhood? graph of japanese statistics[part 1] [part 2] [part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently carried out a survey into society.

Demographics

Between the 20th of January and the 6th of February 2011 10,000 people aged 20 or older selected at random from residency registers from all over the country were approached for interview and 6,338 people agreed to a face-to-face interview. 53.8% of the sample were female, 7.9% in their twenties, 14.0% in their thirties, 16.6% in their forties, 17.2% in their fifties, 23.4% in their sixties, 15.7% in their seventies, and 5.4% aged eighty or older.

I’d be in the “not really” category in the pie chart above. I of course greet everyone in our building when I meet them in the common spaces, and there’s a few other people, but it all gets back to my anti-social gitness, I suppose!
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