The turn of the year and associated events

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Today is a bunch of questions from @nifty around the theme of the New Year.

Demographics

Between the 6th and 12th of December 2013 5,418 members of the @nifty internet service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographic information was provided.

One reason for translating this is that I’ve just finished sending off my New Years cards (the Japanese equivalent of Christmas cards), a total of 16, I think it was, and my wife is sending another 45.
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Coming of Age in 2013: part two of two

How interested are you in working overseas in the future? graph of japanese statistics[part 1][part 2]

Macromill Inc continued their annual tradition of publishing a survey looking at people who are turning 20 and will be attending a Coming of Age ceremony, traditionally held today, January 14th 2013, in their 2013 new adults survey. For reference, I previously translated the 2010 survey.

Demographics

Over the 20th and 21st of December 2012 500 members of the Macromill monitor group who will eligible to attend a Coming of Age ceremony in 2013 completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female, and were all aged either 19 or 20.

The second half of the survey, fortunately, is a bit brighter. 35.4% interested to some degree in foreign employment is quite a bit higher than I would have imagined, although the cynic might say that figure is inflated by those who see a dark future for Japan in Q1, so wish to get out while the going is good…

A surprise for me is that there is a significant difference between the sexes regarding mobile phones; the women seem to have been quicker to switch to smartphones, although I wonder how much is tied in with their much higher SNS usage, as mobiles make Twitter, LINE etc more pleasurable to use.
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Coming of Age in 2013: part one of two

Do you have expectations for the Japanese government? graph of japanese statistics[part 1][part 2]

Macromill Inc continued their annual tradition of publishing a survey looking at people who are turning 20 and will be attending a Coming of Age ceremony, traditionally held today, January 14th 2013, in their 2013 new adults survey. For reference, I previously translated the 2010 survey.

Demographics

Over the 20th and 21st of December 2012 500 members of the Macromill monitor group who will eligible to attend a Coming of Age ceremony in 2013 completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was exactly 50:50 male and female, and were all aged either 19 or 20.

Overall, it’s quite a gloomy survey, not just for the answers on their views on the future, but also seeing the difference in the sexes, such as the women being much less interested in politics, elections and the economy than their male counterparts. On the other hand, a majority have dreams, and although they don’t see a bright future for Japan, they do see one for themselves.
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How Japanese schoolgirls wish a Happy New Year

What kind of decomail do you plan to use? graph of japanese statisticsI missed publishing this report before New Year, but I think the data is interesting enough for you to forgive me the slight slowness. It is a look at New Year greeting situation by Furyu, with the target of the survey being middle and high schoolgirls.

Demographics

Between the 14th and 16th of December 2012 270 middle and high schoolgirls (aged 13 to 18) who used the Pictlink site run by the survey company completed an internet-based questionnaire.

I must say I’m surprised by the results here, as the media tells me that schoolgirls are always on the leading edge of trends, yet good old-fashioned paper postcards maintain their strong showings, followed by bog standard email. However, LINE does put in a very strong showing, but Twitter and SNS barely register. It would also have been useful to see how many people were contacted via each method.

Not being a schoolgirl myself, all my greetings within Japan were postcards. Internet-only friends didn’t merit individually addressed felicitations!
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