Buying a Buddhist shrine

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Here’s an interesting topic that I’ve not looked at before, how people select a Buddhist shrine for their home.

Demographics

No specific demographics were given, but a survey was conducted on the 28th of December 2015 amongst people who had requested a coupon from E-Butsudan.com between the 1st of January and the 22nd of October 2015.

Note that the Japanese “Butsudan” translates as “Buddhist shrine”, and is most commonly bought to house the ashes or just the memory of family who have passed away, although some percentage get sold as “working” Butsdan to active believers; the focus of this survey is, I believe, on the first case, people following tradition rather than religion. I don’t know about the stuff E-Bustudan sells, but the ones I’ve seen tend to be cheap veneer over chipboard and seem vastly overpriced as they presumably have a markup as a donation to the sect that are selling them. Declaring my interest, our Butsudan is a donation that we got for free from fellow believers.

Here is a typical Butsudan, but I think this is a working one rather than a ceremonial one as there seems to be no obvious memorial to a passed away person.

butsudan
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What happens in Japanese coffee shops

goo Ranking recently published a survey on what kinds of things happen at the adjacent coffee shop table.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 27th and 30th of October 2015 500 members aged between 20 and 39, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire.

My typical thing (perhaps it doesn’t bother the Japanese enough to make the list) is ending up sitting beside at best a slurper, at worst (and this happened most recently last Friday) a post-snack tooth sucker; both are enough to make me want to change seats. I see insurance salespeople quite regularly, and the occassional dodgy MLM hard sell going on, but I’ve never had the religious cult stuff, although I do hear from other foreigners that at coffee shops near universities in particular, there is a lot of attempted recruiting going on.

Here’s a picture for No.1 from behind a laptop in a coffee shop; it’s a Mac, so the smug mug is a given…

Coffeeshop Office in Japan
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What Japanese do at the airport

How long do you shop for souvenirs at domestic airports? (Female) graph of japanese statistics
@nifty recently published a survey titled simply airplanes.

Demographics

Between the 11th and 17th of December 2015 3,395 members of the @nifty monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographic information was presented.

Sadly, domestic airlines have mostly stopped their free alcohol service in Japan, so I stick with the coffee on cooler days, or a Diet Coke on warmer ones. If I get to the airport early, I like to hang out in a coffee shop and fiddle with my smartphone, although if I’m with my wife it’s the inevitable trail through all the souvenir shops buying sweets that never get delivered to friends, so we end up eating them all ourselves more often than not!

Here’s some random tat from a Narita airport shop, courtesy of Danny Choo and flickr:

Narita Airport Shops
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Stuff that happens in traffic jams

Tonight will be everyone returning from their New Year holiday, so the roads into the big cities will be blocked up with traffic jams backing up 30km or more, so let’s look what happens in cars in Japan in jams.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where over the 18th and 19th of November 2015 500 members aged between 20 and 39, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire.

When I rent a car, the last leg is usually through a traffic jam black spot (Takarazuka Tunnel, in case you are wondering; the run up to it is up an incline after a long downhill stretch, so cars tend to clump up, producing 5km tailbacks even on quiet days, and 25km on long weekends) but as I’m riding with my weak-bladdered parents-in-law, we’ve already stopped in just about every service area on the way, so the toilet issue is not too bad.

This picture is basically 90% of the news every holiday period; this shot states there is a 45 kilometre tailback predicted for 7pm that evening:

Golden Week Japan
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New Year Nengajo Postcard WTFs

I noticed last time I translated a similar survey I broke my New Year resolution to stop FAIL headlines, so this time rather than FAIL, let’s try using New Year Postcards that make you go “WTF?!”.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 24th and 27th of February 2015 500 members, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire.

I just found this great collection of vintage Year of the Monkey (this year’s card) on Flickr:

Year of the Monkey Postcards

Oh, and Happy New Year to all my readers!
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New Year established customs that Japanese no longer need

Around the New Year there are a lot of old and new customs or established events that perhaps no longer interest people; to see what they might be, goo Ranking ran a survey looking at New Year customs that people feel are no longer needed.

Demographics

Between the 6th and 11th of December 2015 goo Ranking ran an open survey on their web site, which got 767 votes. Since it was an open survey, no demographics are available.

I’d personally vote to get rid of Osechi, the traditional food for seeing in the New Year. It does look nice, I suppose:

OSECHI 2011

To give wives time off (yes, sexist, but it’s an old tradition) food becomes cold everything, with the only warm thing being miso soup with mochi (rice starch) balls. I have to commit the sin of dipping all the cold stuff into the warm soup to make it palatable. It’s enough to make you hanker for cold turkey, and indeed 9 (nine!) years ago I translated another survey on what people want to eat after too much osechi.
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Christmas presents you wish your boyfriend had never bought

It’s nearly Christmas, but I’m not in the mood, so this look by goo Ranking at presents you’d love to tell your boyfriend you didn’t want seems a nice one to translate today.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where over the 27th and 28th of November 2015 500 members, all female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. Everyone was aged between 20 and 39 years old.

A quick search around Flickr revealed no chocolate willies, but I did find this tissue box box; I suspect the maid at the front is producing the tissues from her bra padding…

Novelty Kleenex.jpg
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Japan’s top ten best-received television adverts

The CMDB, Commercial Message (that is, television adverts) Database, part of the CM Sougo Kenkyusho, or Central CM Research Centre as it might be translated to in English, recently published the results of a survey into the best-receieved television advertisements of 2015.

Demographics

Between the 20th of October 2014 and the 19th of October 2015 12 monthly surveys were conducted on 3,000 people per month into the best-received adverts for that month, then the results were summed up over the year to get the overall ranking presented here. The respondents all lived within Tokyo or the surrounding five prefectures.

Without further ado, let’s look at the results. The survey listed representative advertisement names from long-running campaigns, so I shall show the first hit on YouTube for each of the titles.

1: au by KDDI; mobile phone


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Taxi usage in Japan

I was going to do a ranking survey last night, but Windows 10 decided to update itself and go a bit wonky in the process, so I had to babysit it all night. Instead, we’ll have a look at taxis in Japan.

Demographics

Between the 13th and 19th of November 2015 3,062 members of the Nifty monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were presented.

sendai.taxis

A few of the questions in the survey had no direct figures quoted, so some of the numbers will be a bit rough.

My pet hate is taxi drivers not knowing the way, an all-too-common occurance, and although many cabs now have car navigation systems, the drivers seem reluctant to use them. I prefer to sit right behind the driver, but it seems odd that the vast majority prefer the diagonal. I wonder why that is?
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Women’s greatest weapons

First apologies for the recent silence, but things have been really busy at work, and today I cannot even find a nice recent survey, so instead here’s a goo Ranking survey from the summer looking at women’s greatest weapons.

Demographics

This was an open survey conducted amongst users of the goo Ranking service, so apart from 1,371 people answering the question between the 21st of July and the 4th of August 2015, no demographics were available.

Here’s one woman well-equipped with weapon number one:

Yes, I see you too

My wife doesn’t do cleavage much, but I am regularly beaten by tears…
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