Facebook clickbait Japanese cannot resist

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goo Ranking had another fun survey, this time looking at what dodgy link topics on SNS’s people end up clicking on.

Demographics

The survey was conducted between the 26th and 28th of March 2014, and 1,048 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

Sadly, “Translations of dodgy link topics” does not feature on the list.
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Ironing in Japan

How often do you do ironing? graph of japanese statistics

One thing that I still can’t quite get used to in Japan is that despite most people being fashion-conscious, a similar amount seem to be iron-oblivious, with mildly-wrinkled clothes not being an unusual sight on both males and females. Therefore, when I found this survey from Happy Note, a parent-oriented child-rearing support site, looking at doing the ironing, I knew I had to translate it.

Demographics

Between the 15th and 21st of May 2014 527 members of the Happy Note web site completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were given.

My wife doesn’t iron, and I limit mine to trousers and shirts. My mother irons everything right down to socks, but none of that has rubbed off on me!
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Friends’ mildly disagreeable behaviour

I’ve translated a number of surveys about what makes Japanese people want to run a mile, but here we have a survey about words or actions of friends that make you want to run perhaps just a couple of hundred feet.

Demographics

The survey was conducted over the 3rd and 4th of March 2014, and 1,067 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.
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“It’s just not my day!” train happenings

goo Rankings took a look at moments on the train or the station that make people think “It’s just not my day!”.

Demographics

The survey was conducted over the 3rd and 4th of March 2014, and 1,067 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

My event, which happens about once a month, is when someone brings on a 551 Horai carry-out and stinks out the carriage with it. Incidentally, when I was in a slightly posh cafe once, an adjacent table was asked to wrap up their 551 Horai tightly to stop the smell bothering other patrons.

I can smell them just by looking at this picture…
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Over one in three Japanese self-identify as otaku

A recent survey by Dip, conducted to promote their anime holy ground (seichi) site, looked at otaku (geek, hard-core fan)-related matters

Demographics

There were actually two surveys conducted. The first had a sample of 1,843 men and women aged from their teens to 49 years old, and the second involved a subset of 335 people from the original sample (I think – it is not too clear) who had identified themselves as otaku in Q1.

An otakumobile:

Although the demographics are confusing, there does seem to be an indication that the eldest child is an otaku. There is perhaps a reason involving Japanese family structure, but what that might be I have no idea! I welcome any wild speculation from my readers!

These holy grounds are the real life locations represented in various anime and manga; for instance, here is their entry for the hot springs and hotel in Sprited Away/Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi.
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The Twenty Habits of Highly Effective Oyaji

Unlike the similarly-titled better-known book, these are habits you do not want to pick up! An oyaji is a middle-aged man, usually a derogatory term for the kind of middle-aged guy who has the various habits listed below. This survey was by goo Research, and a more correct title translation would be what oyaji habits would you not want to acquire.

Demographics

The survey was conducted from the 22nd to the 24th of February 2014, and 1,047 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample. This survey is for the males of the sample only.

Rather than trying to find a picture of someone hacking up phlegm, here instead are two (point five) online acquaintances who do a regular Two and a Half Oyajis YouTube show.

I have a bit of a cold this weekend, so I’ve been scolded twice today already for hacking up phlegm with a “you’re sounding like an oyaji!” comment from my wife.

About the only one I do is number 4, licking my fingers to open plastic bags at the supermarket. And number 19, of course, which reminds me I wonder if I can find a survey that investigates why women happily wear mini and micro skirts or shorts so frequently, but cleavage is perhaps a once per week sighting for me.

For number 20, according to the internet, in a dodgy pub where you are a regular, doing the finger “x” thing is acceptable; anywhere else is a major faux pas, it seems.
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Wi-fi at overseas airports

How difficult was it to use overseas airport wi-fi? graph of japanese statisticsHere’s an interesting survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, that I found lying about on my hard disk; it was a look at Wi-fi at overseas airports.

Demographics

Between the 6th and 10th of February 2014 1,076 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.1% of the sample were male, 13.7% in their teens, 15.4% in their twenties, 21.2% in their thirties, 17.2% in their forties, 15.0% in their fifties, and 17.6% aged sixty or older.

Setting up one’s device is usually pretty painless these days, but the problem I have is that certain airports have a system that requires you to watch an ad before you can sign in, or others hide the “free” button away in a corner in order to persuade you to sign up for the paid version.
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Features of couples who are likely to split up

goo Ranking conducted a ranking survey looking at the distinctive features of couples who could split up easily.

Demographics

The survey was conducted from the 22nd to the 24th of February 2014, and 1,047 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

It’s interesting that most of the negative character flaws are voted as bigger problems when found in women rather than men; I don’t really know what this means.

Don’t ask me what the difference between answers 34 and 35 is!

I’ve managed to survive number four quite happily despite being a vegetarian, so I’d take this survey with the requisite pinch of salt!
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Taxi apps in Japan

Have you used a smartphone taxi hailing apps? graph of japanese statistics

I’m back, hopefully getting back into a regular multiple-posts-per-week schedule, with this look at taxi hailing apps.

Demographics

Between the 28th of March and the 2nd of April 2014 1,071 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.6% of the sample were male, 13.6% in their teens, 15.7% in their twenties, 21.5% in their thirties, 17.2% in their forties, 14.9% in their fifties, and 17.1% aged sixty or older.

Most of Japan’s taxi apps are official ones from taxi companies; a service like Uber does not exist in Japan, and I don’t think it would work here. As I understand it, taxi companies in America often do not come when called, so Uber, even though it apparently more expensive than a regular taxi, fills a niche. In Japan, there are if anything too many taxis, so failing to appear is never a problem.
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Takarazuka fans’ surprising unwritten rules

With Takarazuka Theatre celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, goo Ranking took a look at surprising unwritten rules of Takarazuka fan clubs and the stereotypical behaviour of Takrazuka fans.

Demographics

The survey was conducted from the 22nd to the 24th of February 2014, and 1,141 people completed a private web-based questionnaire. Note that the score in the results refers to the relative number of votes for each option, not a percentage of the total sample.

I used to live just down the road from Takarazuka theatre, so every morning and evening going to and coming from work I could see fans milling about at the ticket office and the stage door.

Note that the actresses are usually known as Takarasienne, to introduce a sort of European mystique as the inspiration is Parisienne. It is often abbreviated to just ‘sienne, and pronounced “jenne”.

It’s not 100% clear from the question working if the questions are ranked on the degree of surprise or the degree of unknownness.
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