What Japanese businessspeople have for breakfast

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How often do you eat breakfast? graph of japanese statisticsiResearch recently published a survey into businesspeople and their breakfasts.

I have breakfast every day, but weekdays it is merely toast during the winter, and once it gets a bit warmer I’ll switch to granola. I’d like to have bananas more often, but for whatever reason I don’t eat them. If I’m staying in a hotel, I’ll have grapefruit juice, but otherwise I almost never drink any.
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Japanese fill in the blank: Marriage is Life’s [_______]

goo Ranking recently posted (or reposted, looking at the date) a survey into filling in the blank: Marriage is Life’s [_______].

I’ll have to choose the positive answers here, and not just because my wife is looking over my shoulder.

Here’s a random photo from Flickr on the theme of “Japan marriage”:

marriage
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Utter disappointments at cherry blossom parties

Today is the day of the Tokyo YouTuber Hanami (cherry blossom viewing) party (still time to catch them at the pub!), and although I couldn’t attend, I can instead send a goo Ranking survey on major downers that happen at cherry blossom viewing.

A friend went to one a couple of years ago in Osaka, but he said everyone was too young so he couldn’t get into the party mood (#10 below), but for me this year, I probably know very few planning to attend (#7) and the few I do know I only know from on-line, and given that the meeting place was Yoyogi Park with no further directions, I’d probably have experienced #9. However #6, too cold for beer, is something I just cannot parse.

Here’s a typical cherry blossom party scene:

花見 上野公園. Hanami, Ueno park. Tokyo Japan 東京 日本
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Two in five thinking of quitting Facebook

How often do full real life Facebook posts irritate you? graph of japanese statisticsThis was an interesting survey from Times Current titled rather dramatically “Being tired of other’s full real life”, a title based on a Japanese expression リア充, ria-juu, being satisfied with one’s real offline life.

One of my online (and offline too) friends is perhaps just a bit too much ria-juu with airline business class lounge photos, domestic holidays, posh dinners, etc, but it rather than annoying me it motivates me to work harder so I too can have a similar life.
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Japanese women and selfies

Have you ever taken a selfie? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey conducted by the publishers of a fleamarket app “ZOZO Furima” looked at selfies, with the tenuous link to the fleamarket app being that women might be buying or selling the outfits featured in their selfies that they upload to Facebook, etc.

I don’t think I’ve ever seriously taken a selfie (just once when experimenting with a new phone) and I can’t imagine uploading one to a social network, especially for the reason of showing off my fashion sense!
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Instagram used by over one in three young Japanese women

Teenage girls, do you use Instagram? graph of japanese statistics
COLOPAL’s SmartAnswer recently conducted a survey into Instagram use, finding it most popular with younger girls and women.

Instagram is another thing that I’ve never got into, so I don’t know what I’m missing, but I suspect it is nothing much… If any of my readers feel like trying to convince me, please suggest accounts worth following, and I’ll give it a try. A quick search for “Instagram cats” gave me this:

From @misato_2cats: "I want you to have another cup of coffee,please!" #catsofinstagram

A photo posted by Cats of Instagram (@cats_of_instagram) on

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Electricity market liberalisation

How do you rate electricity market liberalisation? graph of japanese statisticsNext month the marketplace for domestic electricity will be opened up, allowing many companies to sell electricity direct to consumers, rather than the current situation of monopoly providers. Belle Maison Lifestyle Research Labs recently conducted a survey into electricity liberalisation to see how aware people were of their new choices.

I’ve already signed up with Tokyo Gas; they seem to have the best deal going overall, and they are only one of three companies that have no compulsory contract length, so we can change any time; many other providers have one or two year terms that may lock you into a bad deal.
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White Day gifts that make you run a mile

Today is White Day in Japan, a second chance for chocolate makers to sell overpriced gifts; Valentine’s Day in Japan is for women to give gifts to men, so White Day is the day men are expected to return the favour. Thus this survey from goo Ranking looking at what gifts from men would make women run a mile. Furthermore, just to keep the balance, I’ll also present what items their girlfriends pulling from their bag would make men run a mile in the opposite direction.

My White Day gift was a bit of a disaster this year – I had a brush with the ‘flu over the weekend, and today it was pouring down, so I was in no mood for going shopping, so it was just a quick choice of a couple of cakes from a shop on the way home.

Here’s some nice chocolates to celebrate what’s left of the day!

swiss chocolate adapted to japanese habits (27 of 124)
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What Japanese love and hate about cats

I cannot find a nice goo Ranking for Silly Sunday, so instead let’s have some kittens, with a look at what people love and hate about cats by @Nifty, which I’ll present as a ranking.

I’d love to visit this temple!

豪徳寺・招き猫 / Manekineko in Gotokuji - Setagaya, Tokyo

I’m very much a cat person, and I’m joint owned by two of them. Frequent vomiting is probably my least favourite thing, especially as one cat has a chewing habit, and never learns that eating his blanket, eating sticky tape, eating his cardboard bed, etc, are guaranteed to have him spewing up the next day.

By the way, translating this survey I learnt that the breed マンチカン, read Manchikan, is actually called Munchkin in English. When I tried Googling how I thought it was spelt, Google corrected me to Mancunian
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Two in five Tokyo home-owners think foreigners shouldn’t use Airbnb

Airbnb shouldn't allow foreigners to use their services graph of japanese statistics

Marketing Research Camp recently published a survey into Minpaku – literally “staying at private homes” – a Japanese term for “Bed and Breakfast”, and its more modern form, Airbnb.

This is a very interesting survey; the report here was based on a single question published on the web site (their full 61 page report is available for free download, however) and revealed a number of interesting statistics. In particular, the headline figure of 40% Tokyo-resident home-owners thinking that Airbnb and similar services should not accept foreign customers is quite an eye-opener. Recently, there has been a lot of news articles about poor-mannered foreign guests (and I’ve even seen other foreign residents complaining of this) being excessively noisy in common areas of flats where there is an Airbnb property, and the implication from the news being that the vast majority of the places are not people renting out a spare room, but one-room flats being bought (or indeed illegally subletted) in residential property specifically for Airbnbing while the owner lives elesewhere.

One local government in Tokyo (Ota ward) recently tried to regulate Airbnb-type rentals, but I heard just two properties applied for certification.

Just for the record, I do not approve of Airbnb-type rental outside of spare rooms in one’s own home, and I think there should be just as strict regulation of online BnB properties as there is of traditional BnBs.

Note that I’ve decided to move demographic information to the end of articles from now on.
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