Archive for Politics

Diplomacy in Japan in 2011: part 1 of 2

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Do you have friendly feelings towards China? graph of japanese statisticsThe Cabinet Office Japan recently conducted a detailed survey into diplomacy, a topic they revisit about once every two years or so.

Demographics

Between the 29th of September and the 16th of October 2011, 3,000 people aged twenty or older were randomly selected from residency registers were approached for one-to-one interiews. Of the 3,000, 1,912 people, or 63.7% were resident at the adress and willing to answer the questions. 52.5% of the sample were female, 8.2% in their twenties, 14.7% in their thirties, 14.8% int heir forties, 16.6% in their fifties, 22.8% in their sixties, and 22.8% aged seventy or older. 44.4% were employed, 9.8% were self-employed, 2.9% worked in a family business, and 42.9% were one of full-time homekeepers, students, unemployed, or retired.

This survey was reported on last week in the papers, but the English translations seemed to focus mostly on the relationship between the USA and Japan; the level of relationships with Japan’s Asian neighbours is a much more interesting statistic, however.
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Vast majority find government slow, untrustworthy on Fukushima

How trustworthy is the government's Fukushima-related information? graph of japanese statisticsWith almost every day bringing a new revelation about how TEPCO failed to release data in a timely manner, and how the government is trying to protect TEPCO or itself rather than kicking ass and taking names, this survey from iShare into nuclear-related information from the government found that not surprisingly, many, many people are dissatisfied.

Demographics

On the 15th of April 2011 1,193 members of the CLUB BBQ free email forwarding service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.3% of the sample were male, 8.9% in their twenties, 45.7% in their thirties, and 45.4% in their forties. People from the disaster-affected areas were not surveyed.

Note that this survey was conducted over a month ago, and I suspect if it were repeated today the figures would be even further down the scales of trust and speed, as this week we have finally had official notification that there was a meltdown, despite all evidence pointing towards some degree of fuel rod melting and two months of most commentators agreeing that there had been.
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Corporate Twitter more useful than Japan’s government

Have you ever viewed Tweets from private or public organisations? graph of japanese statisticsUnfortunately, the reports on japan.internet.com of surveys from goo Research recently took a turn for the worse with only one, not three, data sets being reported in detail. However, I will keep using them, but there will be more text and less tables. The first of these abbreviated surveys is on Twitter, with the focus being on getting information with, I suspect, the recent Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster being prominent in people’s minds when answering.

Demographics

Betweem the 12th and 18th of April 2011 1,082 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.2% of the sample were male, 16.5% in their teens, 18.5% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties. 15.9% in their forties, 15.2% in their fifties, and 12.2% aged sixty or older.

I didn’t use Twitter to get any information, but I’m glad that not too many people seemed to have found information such as that from the French embassy useful.
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Japanese society in 2011: part 3 of 3

Overall, are you satisfied or dissatisfied with today's public services? graph of japanese statistics[part 1] [part 2] [part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently carried out a survey into society.

Demographics

Between the 20th of January and the 6th of February 2011 10,000 people aged 20 or older selected at random from residency registers from all over the country were approached for interview and 6,338 people agreed to a face-to-face interview. 53.8% of the sample were female, 7.9% in their twenties, 14.0% in their thirties, 16.6% in their forties, 17.2% in their fifties, 23.4% in their sixties, 15.7% in their seventies, and 5.4% aged eighty or older.

Comparing the results of Q18 with the same question in a previous survey from 2008 (see Q15), one item going downhill fast is diplomacy – 22.7% in 2008 to 46.3% this year – which is most likely a result of the Senkaku Islands incident.
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Japanese society in 2011: part 2 of 3

How often do you interact with people in your neighbourhood? graph of japanese statistics[part 1] [part 2] [part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently carried out a survey into society.

Demographics

Between the 20th of January and the 6th of February 2011 10,000 people aged 20 or older selected at random from residency registers from all over the country were approached for interview and 6,338 people agreed to a face-to-face interview. 53.8% of the sample were female, 7.9% in their twenties, 14.0% in their thirties, 16.6% in their forties, 17.2% in their fifties, 23.4% in their sixties, 15.7% in their seventies, and 5.4% aged eighty or older.

I’d be in the “not really” category in the pie chart above. I of course greet everyone in our building when I meet them in the common spaces, and there’s a few other people, but it all gets back to my anti-social gitness, I suppose!
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Japanese society in 2011: part 1 of 3

Should more patriotism be fostered amongst the citizens? graph of japanese statistics[part 1] [part 2] [part 3]

The Cabinet Office Japan recently carried out a survey into society.

Demographics

Between the 20th of January and the 6th of February 2011 10,000 people aged 20 or older selected at random from residency registers from all over the country were approached for interview and 6,338 people agreed to a face-to-face interview. 53.8% of the sample were female, 7.9% in their twenties, 14.0% in their thirties, 16.6% in their forties, 17.2% in their fifties, 23.4% in their sixties, 15.7% in their seventies, and 5.4% aged eighty or older.

I’ve highlighted Q2 on love for Japan, which I think is a topic that I’d like to see explored more to find out exactly what aspects of patriotism people think is missing. Patriotism is of course a loaded word, and I get the feeling that it is not wanting more people to stand up for the national anthem that 81% have in mind, but just to get younger people who are disengaged from society back into the fold, so teaching love for the country gets everyone singing from the same sheet figuratively rather than literally. Or is it just that my cup is half-full? The first and third answers to Q9 (coming tomorrow) is part of what makes me take this stance.
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Eco Car purchasing in Japan

Do you have an Eco Car in the family? graph of japanese statisticsWith the termination of the Eco Car subsidy being largely responsible for the recently-announced 1.1% drop in Japan’s GDP for the previous quarter, this seems a good time to look at how the public perceived the scheme through the results of a survey from DIMSDRIVE Research.

Demographics

Between the 21st of October and the 5th of November 2010 7,681 members of the DIMSDRIVE monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.9% of the sample were male, 0.7% in their teens, 10.6% in their twenties, 29.9% in their thirties, 32,5% in their forties, 17.6% in their fifties, and 8.7% in their sixties.

From an economic standpoint, the Eco Car scheme was good for opening wallets and getting money circulating, the biggest issue these days in the Japanese economy. From an environmental standpoint, however, a lot of cars were upgraded earlier that they needed be, the life and recycling of the batteries in hybrids is still an open question, and due to the way the scheme was structured, a lot of cars were not really that ecologically sound. A good diesel, such as on a Volkswagen, can outrun most other cars, although diesel does not have a good image in Japan.
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More on quitting smoking due to tax rises

About how many packs of cigarettes did you stock up? graph of japanese statisticsThe latest company to jump into the fray by covering the tobacco tax hike and quitting smoking were DIMSDRIVE Research.

Demographics

Between the 6th and 21st of October 2010 5,170 members of the DIMSDRIVE monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 58.0% of the sample were female, 14.2% in their twenties, 36.8% in their thirties, 33.8% in their forties, 13.3% in their fifties, and 1.9% aged sixty or older.

In Q2SQ2, how much cheaper a pack people switched to, the average was over 100 yen a pack; given the tax rise was about 100 yen, they cancel themselves out, but as far as I am aware almost brands are within 40 or 50 yen of each other, so I don’t really know how people managed to save over 100 yen, unless they were talking about per case of 200 or some other bulk-buying.

At two of my favourite restaurants the number of smokers has dropped to either none or just one group recently, although I don’t know how much that has to do with the rise in duty.
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Staggering opposition to staggered holidays

Do you support or oppose staggering holiday periods? graph of japanese statisticsOne of the Democratic Party of Japan’s good ideas from my point of view was to propose staggered holidays across the country rather than the current situation of all 120 million taking their May Golden Week holiday all at the same time. To see how this proposal was being received by the public, the Cabinet Office Japan conducted a survey into this topic.

Demographics

Between the 21st and 31st of October 2010 3,000 people selected at random from resident registers were approached to take part in a survey, and 1,953 people, or 65.1% agreed to a face-to-face interview. The sex breakdown was not reported.

Currently in Japan there is the Golden Week holiday over the end of April and the start of May when the vast majority of the public have a holiday, plus four public holidays are set to be on a particular Monday in a particular month. The proposal from the government is to split the country from north to south into five blocks and assign a week’s spring and autumn holiday period (the autumn holiday being new) to each block, and move the four Monday holidays to a fixed date and no longer make them public holidays.

I used to be very much in favour of this idea, but on reading a few opinions from other foreigners I’m a bit less keen on the idea, the reason being that the ideal situation would be to make easier to take holidays at one’s own convenience, just like most of the rest of the world. One benefit, however, would be an easing of traffic by spreading it over five weeks, and hopefully lower prices as hotels now have a ten week busy period rather than the current situation of just one week of complete overbooking, and the attendant increased money circulation from more people being able to take a holiday rather than just staying at home as they cannot afford to travel.
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PC recycling law still mostly unknown

Do you know about the PC Recycle Law? graph of japanese statisticsIn this recent survey from goo Research, reported on by japan.internet.com, into the PC Recycle Law, the vast majority who knew it well reckoned it worked to at least some degree.

Demographics

On the 6th of September 2010 1,084 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.6% of the sample were male, 16.0% in their teens, 17.5% in their twenties, 21.2% in their thirties, 16.5% in their forties, 16.3% in their fifties, and 12.5% aged sixty or older.

I never got any explanation about the law, nor did I see anything in the manual, when I bought my computer nor my LCD monitor, which should also be covered.

I know somone who was too stingy to pay the 4,000 yen or so to throw out an ancient LCD monitor, so instead he dismantled it and chucked it out (in the correct recycle bins, I he must add) bit by bit.
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