Archive for Lifestyle

Coffee habits of the Japanese

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Throughout the year, which do you drink more of? graph of japanese statistics

@nifty recently released a survey looking into coffee.

I most often drink convenience store coffee; it’s cheap and fresh and quite, quite drinkable, and with convenience stores near to the office, I quite often take a cup with me to work.

I’m quite surprised, however, in Q4 to see that Starbucks over-roasted drip coffee gets chosen as the favourite drink from there. I find it often quite undrinkable, but having said that, I was as Starbucks this morning (at last year’s Medicine Nobel winner’s hospital, Kitasato) and I have to admit that today’s blend was quite drinkable.

Here’s an old-school coffee shop that still survives despite Starbucks and friends:

Roman Coffee Shop, Matsue, Japan
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Grave concerns in Japan

What is important when selecting a grave? graph of japanese statistics

Excuse the poor pun of a title, but this survey into purchasing and moving graves by the Japan Stone Products Cooperative Association perhaps needed a little bit of levity on this weighty topic.

I’ve got my family plot bought (here’s a web site with a newspaper article on it, along with rather incongruous adverts), or at least it will be mine after 72 easy monthly installments, and perhaps this summer I may be able to take time to go and visit my future home
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Sniffing your own sweaty armpits

Do you sniff your own armpits in public? graph of japanese statistics
Don’t say I don’t bring you surveys about these weird corners of public opinion in Japan, as today I offer you the officially-titled checking sweat smells, but as the accompanying video makes clear, it’s all about sniffing your own pits.

I don’t need to secretly sniff – I only worry when I can smell it without exerting any effort into pong detection. Anyway, it’s a natural function, and my cat loves that the temperatures have now risen and he can get his nose stuck into my armpits.
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What Japanese businessspeople have for breakfast

How often do you eat breakfast? graph of japanese statisticsiResearch recently published a survey into businesspeople and their breakfasts.

I have breakfast every day, but weekdays it is merely toast during the winter, and once it gets a bit warmer I’ll switch to granola. I’d like to have bananas more often, but for whatever reason I don’t eat them. If I’m staying in a hotel, I’ll have grapefruit juice, but otherwise I almost never drink any.
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Japanese women and selfies

Have you ever taken a selfie? graph of japanese statisticsA recent survey conducted by the publishers of a fleamarket app “ZOZO Furima” looked at selfies, with the tenuous link to the fleamarket app being that women might be buying or selling the outfits featured in their selfies that they upload to Facebook, etc.

I don’t think I’ve ever seriously taken a selfie (just once when experimenting with a new phone) and I can’t imagine uploading one to a social network, especially for the reason of showing off my fashion sense!
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Japan’s favourite chocolate

It’s Valentine’s Day today, but I cannot find a nice ranking, so instead here’s an ordinary survey from @nifty about chocolate.

Demographics

Between the 29th of January and the 4th of February 2016 3,364 members of the @nifty research group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were given.

I don’t understand why mint scores so low in Q3; most of my foreign friends cannot wait until summer and mint chocolate sweets come into season, but whatever they are offering are difficult to find and the season ends all too quickly. On the other hand, in the second part of Q1, I cannot really believe that half the surveyed population eats chocolates four or more times per day!

Here’s some interesting chocolate flavours:

Tomato chocolate?
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Autonomous vehicles not that popular in Japan

Would you pay 100,000 yen for emergency braking assistance system? graph of japanese statistics

As this is very closely related to my current work, this survey from Nippon Research Center on autonomous driving is very interesting to me.

Demographics

Between the 1st and 7th of July 2015 1,200 members of the Japanese public were randomly selected and interviewed face-to-face. 50.3% of the sample were female, 6.0% in their teens, 12.4% in their twenties, 16.2% in their thirties, 17.8% in their forties, 15.2% in their fifties, 18.1% in their sixties, and 14.5% in their seventies.

In Q1, the four levels mentioned are described in this document. Level 1 is simple automation of a single function in specific conditions, like maintaining speed while using cruise control. Level 2 controls multiple function, like automated parking that exercising acceleration, braking and steering simultaneously. Level 3 is autonomous driving in specific situations, like motorway driving, and finally Level 4 is 100% full automation in all situations. As far as I am aware, Japanese manufacturers are at Level 2 for parking, lane keeping, etc, and although there are demonstrations of Level 3-like behaviour, they are very canned. Google are probably high Level 3, and Tesla claim Level 3 for motorways, but I don’t really believe it.

I love the smug Eikichi Yazawa’s “Look no hands!” in this ad:


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90% of Japanese like beer

How do you find beer? graph of japanese statisticsKyodo Press Agency recently conducted a survey about, and simply titled, beer.

Demographics

Between the 16th and 18th of January 2016 1,000 people from all over Japan aged between 20 and 69 years old completed an internet-based questionnaire. There was no information about how the sample was gathered, or even if non-beer drinkers were filtered out or not, but it does seem odd that in Q1 there is no “Don’t drink alcohol” option. It might be safe to assume that only beer drinkers were surveyed, though.

Happoshu is a (not very) beer-like substance, made, I suspect, by basically adding alcohol to fizzy hop tea. Third-sector beer is brewed from non-traditional ingredients like beans. Both non-beer types recently tend towards “healthy” labels of zero or low purine, sugars, preservatives, etc. Personally, I find the no or low-sugar non-beers quite good for weeknight drinking, as they leave less of a heavy stomach behind the next morning, and some are even quite passable, and certainly beat beer in the cost-performance stakes, as due to tax anomalies they are half the price of real beer.
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Pasta likes and dislikes

Men, how do you eat spaghetti? graph of japanese statistics@nifty took a look at pasta and spaghetti, but sadly did not ask the question I wanted to hear the answer to, “Do you slurp your pasta?”, a rather too frequent event here that puts me right off my food!

Demographics

Between the 25th of December 2015 and the 7th of January 2016 3,426 members of the @nifty monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographic information was presented.

As is typical for @nifty, not all the graphs they presented were labelled, so when I have text rather than a table for a question, I am estimating the figures.

I love pasta! My favourite is probably just a simple tomato sauce with mozzarella and a basil leaf or two, with potato and pine nuts in genovese sauce a close second. I would rate arrabbiata higher, but it’s difficult to find a restaurant that does it well.
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Buying a Buddhist shrine

Here’s an interesting topic that I’ve not looked at before, how people select a Buddhist shrine for their home.

Demographics

No specific demographics were given, but a survey was conducted on the 28th of December 2015 amongst people who had requested a coupon from E-Butsudan.com between the 1st of January and the 22nd of October 2015.

Note that the Japanese “Butsudan” translates as “Buddhist shrine”, and is most commonly bought to house the ashes or just the memory of family who have passed away, although some percentage get sold as “working” Butsdan to active believers; the focus of this survey is, I believe, on the first case, people following tradition rather than religion. I don’t know about the stuff E-Bustudan sells, but the ones I’ve seen tend to be cheap veneer over chipboard and seem vastly overpriced as they presumably have a markup as a donation to the sect that are selling them. Declaring my interest, our Butsudan is a donation that we got for free from fellow believers.

Here is a typical Butsudan, but I think this is a working one rather than a ceremonial one as there seems to be no obvious memorial to a passed away person.

butsudan
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