Archive for Lifestyle

Female English vampires in Japan

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Have you ever had a romantic relationship with a foriegn man? graph of japanese statisticsWeblio recently published a self-serving survey into Japanese women’s views on international love, although given the sample group, the results here should not be used to extrapolate to the whole Japanese population.

Demographics

Between the 24th of January and the 2nd of February 2015 471 female members of the Weblio service completed a survey performed using Macromill Inc’s Quick-CROSS tool. No age details were provided.

I’m not sure how common the phrase in the headline is, but there is a trait found in certain Japanese women who want their token foreigner man to show off to their friends, or just get free lessons off, thus the English vampire in the title. Actually, when I met my wife, she too was to some extent looking for just English conversation practice before a planned working holiday to the UK.
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Why foreign men dislike Japanese women’s gait

< ?PHP
include "/home/kenyn/public_html/libchart/libchart.php";

$chart = new PieChart(400, 200);

$chart->setTitle(“What do you think about how Japanese women walk in high heels?”);
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“Extremely clumsy”, 22));
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“Clumsy”, 38));
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“A little clumsy”, 30));
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“Looks good”, 10));
$chart->render(“/home/kenyn/public_html/image14/high-heel-walk.png”);
?>
What do you think about how Japanese women walk in high heels? graph of japanese statisticsOmron, a healthcare electronics manufacturer, published a survey that serves to advertise their new female-oriented device that diagnoses one’s walking style, with this survey asking foreign men what they think of Japanese women’s way of walking.

Demographics

Between the 23rd and 31st of October 2014 the company Neon Marketing, on behalf of Omron and underwear manufacturer Wacoal, asked a mere 50 foreign men who had lived in Japan more than a year to fill out a private internet-based survey.

I think Japanese women in high heels, on the whole, are extremely clumsy-looking. Often, they walk like Honda’s humanoid robot Asimov, with knees bent forward and bum sticking out, and stiff legs pivoting at the pelvis only. Furthermore, there is a lack of ankle muscles or ankle support, so most of them twist their ankles with every step. I’ve seen more graceful baby giraffes taking their first few hesitant steps!
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What foreigners love and hate about Japanese public toilets

How cleaner are Japanese public toilets? graph of japanese statisticsJapanese public toilets are something that almost every visitor to Japan will experience, so this survey from the toilet manufacturer Toto looked at foreigners and toilets to see what issues there were.

Demographics

During September and October of 2014 600 foreign residents of Japan aged 20 or older completed an internet-based survey; ten countries were represented; South Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, USA, France, UK, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. No further demographics were presented.

I’ve used a Japanese-style toilet for number twos exactly once, at a bowling alley when I had the runs, and in the process managed to get a rather large poo stain on my trousers, a fact I never realised until I got home that night. I’m very particular about toilets, so barring emergencies I use department store Western-style toilets almost exclusively, and I tend to select heated seats, but I never touch any of the bum-squirting stuff.
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Japanese sleep patterns

How much sleep do you get on average on weekdays? graph of japanese statisticsThe company Aisin Seiki recently conducted a survey into sleep.

Demographics

Between the 24th and 26th of June 2014 1,206 people aged between 18 and 69 (and implied to be in paid employment) completed an internet survey, although details of whether it was a closed or open survey were not reported. Detailed demographic was similarly unavailable.

Further information on sleep patterns of 100 people with 100 different jobs is available, as is a sleep monitoring device which they presumably used to collect said 100 people’s data.

Well, I’d hate to say how little sleep I get on weekdays, but you can look at the post timestamp and work it out for yourself. At least I very rarely wake before my alarm.
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Ironing in Japan

How often do you do ironing? graph of japanese statistics

One thing that I still can’t quite get used to in Japan is that despite most people being fashion-conscious, a similar amount seem to be iron-oblivious, with mildly-wrinkled clothes not being an unusual sight on both males and females. Therefore, when I found this survey from Happy Note, a parent-oriented child-rearing support site, looking at doing the ironing, I knew I had to translate it.

Demographics

Between the 15th and 21st of May 2014 527 members of the Happy Note web site completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographics were given.

My wife doesn’t iron, and I limit mine to trousers and shirts. My mother irons everything right down to socks, but none of that has rubbed off on me!
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Just two in five Japanese always wash hands with soap after public toilet poo

How do you wash your hands after public toilet poo? graph of japanese statisticsI don’t know how these numbers compare with elsewhere in the world, but the results of this survey from VLC (Value Create) into toilets produced a few quite interesting results.

Demographics

Over the 19th and 20th of September 2013 1,045 members of VL Crew completed a private internet-based questionnaire. The sample was 50:50 male and female, and 20.0% in each of the twenties, thirties, forties, fifties and sixties age groups.

My home toilet has both a heated seat (lovely) and a bum squirter (yuk!). I used it once or twice when we first got it, but quite frankly I couldn’t see the point, and all the water down there melts toilet paper when I try to dry off afterwards.
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The turn of the year and associated events

Today is a bunch of questions from @nifty around the theme of the New Year.

Demographics

Between the 6th and 12th of December 2013 5,418 members of the @nifty internet service completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographic information was provided.

One reason for translating this is that I’ve just finished sending off my New Years cards (the Japanese equivalent of Christmas cards), a total of 16, I think it was, and my wife is sending another 45.
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What Washoku means to the Japanese

With Washoku, Japanese traditional home cooking, being awarded UNESCO status as an intangible cultural heritage, this recent survey from Kikkoman, a soy sauce maker, into awareness of Washoku provides some useful background data.

Demographics

Over the 27th and 28th of November 2013 830 housewives between the ages of 20 and 69 completed a private internet-based questionnaire. There is no information on how the sample was gathered, but the results were weighted according to the actual demographics of Japan.

As a coincidence, I had this Washoku meal tonight while out:

Restaurant Washoku

I’m not sure if the tofu-burger in the middle counts, but the surrounding dishes are certainly Washoku; anti-clockwise from the 5 grain rice we have pickles (yuk, passed them to my wife), seaweed (wakame) and fried tofu miso soup, purple sweet potato salad, konnyaku (double yuk!), hiyakko cold tofu, salad, and gobo (burdock root). Very nice it was too – my review should appear here soon.
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Most Japanese bothered by walking smartphone fiddlers

Are people who use their smartphones while walking a nuisance? graph of japanese statisticsMobile Marketing Data Laboratories recently conducted a survey into a minor social problem that has grown along with smartphone usage, that of using one’s smartphone while walking.

Demographics

Between the 13th and 15th of November 2013 558 members of the MMD Labo monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. All the people were smartphone users, and the demographics say that the sample was aged between 20 and 59 years old, but looking at Q1 I can see that 18 and 19 year olds, and those 60 or older were also questioned. No further demographic information was provided.

Talking of walking with smartphones, Japan Times recently stretched the definition of “news” rather too far with the author of this piece suggesting that negative press about walking with smartphones was a plot by Japan Inc. to spoil the iPhone 5s and 5c launch.

I don’t believe in coincidences. From Sept. 20, NTT Docomo, Softbank and au all began selling Apple’s newest-model iPhones, and I suspect the big difference is that foreign brands are threatening to expand their dominance of the market. So behind this wave of complaints is wounded national pride and concerns that Japanese firms are being nudged out of their own (very lucrative) market.

What a load of nonsense, but sadly reflective of the current editorial bent of newspaper, and also not the worst nonsense they have printed under a “news” headline.
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Excel spreadsheets most popular family budget management tool

How often do you update budgeting app data? graph of japanese statisticsgoo Research recently performed a survey, reported on by japan.internet.com, into keeping track of the family budget, a job in Japan that usually falls upon the wife.

Demographics

etween the 25th and 28th of September 2013 1,090 members of the goo Research online monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 53.8% of the sample were male, 13.5% in their teens, 15.4% in their twenties, 21.6% in their thirties, 17.3% in their forties, 14.7% in their fifties, and 17.5% aged sixty or older.
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