Railway station message boards in Japan

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Should station notice boards be kept as is? graph of japanese statisticsHere’s a little bit of Japanese rail transport recent history I wasn’t aware of, uncovered in a survey by goo Research and reported on by japan.internet.com into railway station message boards. It appears that these blackboards could be used not just for official announcements, but also by the public for passing messages. Now, of course, the mobile phone has replaced the need.

Demographics

Between the 12th and 16th of July 2010 1,051 members of the goo Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 52.3% of the sample were male, 16.6% in their teens, 18.6% in their twenties, 21.4% in their thirties, 16.0% in their forties, 15.5% in their fifties, and 12.0% aged sixty or older.

There’s no notice board in my station in an obvious place, although I think I remember seeing one when I had to go to the station office, but it is probably used for internal communication only. Here’s a sample board, with the message saying “A perv was here”, taken by Tomozo on flickr.

Station notice board

Research results

Q1: Is there a notice board set up in the nearest station to you (JR, private railways or underground)? (Sample size=1,051)

Yes 17.6%
No 31.2%
Don’t know 51.2%

Q2: Should station notice boards be kept as is? (Sample size=1,051)

Want them to remain 47.9%
Don’t mind if they disappear 29.1%
Don’t know 23.0%

Q3: Should station notice boards be made into touch panel displays so you can enter your own messages? (Sample size=1,051)

Yes 29.8%
No 46.9%
Don’t know 23.3%
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1 Comment »

  1. Katie said,
    July 28, 2010 @ 03:04

    Interesting that the sample was made of so many in their 30s – wonder if that means they remember when there were more of these hanging around? Despite Japan’s reputation for advancement and trend-setting, there is a deep vein of posterity – perhaps including these signs.

    I am a big fan of train stations keeping their cultural character, so I hope these stay.

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