90% of Japanese like beer

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How do you find beer? graph of japanese statisticsKyodo Press Agency recently conducted a survey about, and simply titled, beer.

Demographics

Between the 16th and 18th of January 2016 1,000 people from all over Japan aged between 20 and 69 years old completed an internet-based questionnaire. There was no information about how the sample was gathered, or even if non-beer drinkers were filtered out or not, but it does seem odd that in Q1 there is no “Don’t drink alcohol” option. It might be safe to assume that only beer drinkers were surveyed, though.

Happoshu is a (not very) beer-like substance, made, I suspect, by basically adding alcohol to fizzy hop tea. Third-sector beer is brewed from non-traditional ingredients like beans. Both non-beer types recently tend towards “healthy” labels of zero or low purine, sugars, preservatives, etc. Personally, I find the no or low-sugar non-beers quite good for weeknight drinking, as they leave less of a heavy stomach behind the next morning, and some are even quite passable, and certainly beat beer in the cost-performance stakes, as due to tax anomalies they are half the price of real beer.
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Japan’s zombie goods that refuse to die

goo Ranking had an interesting survey looking at what items looks as if they will disappear, but probably won’t.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 4th and 7th of December 2015 500 members of their monitor group aged between 20 and 39, and 50:50 male and female, completed a private internet-based questionnaire.

Most conspicuous by its absence in this list is the fax machine, although it doesn’t seem to be anywhere near one foot in the grave here in Japan. On the news, for example, when they are reporting press releases there is always a shot of a sheet of A4 with a low-resolution fax printed on it, rather than a nice formatted PDF or a screenshot. However, I do suspect that this must be a TV world in-joke, where on getting an emailed release they either print it out using a custom crappy fax font, or they fax it to their cheapest 10 dpi thermal paper-using fax for that authentic Ye Olde Faxe effect.

And talking of Ye Olde Faxe:

Faxing Wishes for the Star Festival, after Toshikata
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Queueing in Japan

How do you feel when you see an unknown queue? graph of japanese statistics

I thought it was us British that were a nation of queuers, but the Japanese do take the same pride in their ability to stand in a line, so this survey from Research Plus took a look at queueing.

Demographics

Between the 13th and 18th of January 2016 760 members of the Research Plus monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. 54.7% of the sample were female, 2.5% in their twenties, 5.7% in their thirties, 17.5% in their forties, 30.3% in their fifties, and 44.1% aged sixty or older. The sample was also split 50:50 between residents of Kanto (Tokyo area) and Kansai (Osaka area), although not too much difference was to be seen in the answers.

Queues in Japan, outside of the obvious places like Disneyland, are often found when foreign chains open their first branch in Japan, and last days if not weeks until the novelty wears off. Ramen restaurants are another favourite, but I avoid both these kinds of places as my stomach tells me waiting a couple of hours is not worth it! Thirty minutes is the most I’m prepared to wait for food.
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Few Japanese children learning dance, street most popular

From 2012 dance became a compulsory part of the curriculum in Japanese schools, so Yamaha Music Japan decided to conduct a survey into awareness of dance to see how dance was fitting in to a child’s education.

Demographics

Between the 30th of September and 1st of October 2015 1,000 parents, 50:50 male and female, aged between 25 and 60 years old and with a child in primary school (aged between 6 and 12) completed an internet-based survey. How the sample was chosen is not noted.

Back when I was in primary school, we had a few lessons in traditional Scottish Country dance that stood me in good stead for céilidhs later on in life; nothing serious, just the steps for the Gay Gordons and the like. Now I think of it, Japanese traditional dances don’t feature in the answers – are they already taught elsewhere in the curriculum?

Here’s a kiddy version of my favourite dance troupe, World Order:


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Stuff you wish I’d not told you about Japanese girls’ schools

Here is an anti-ranking, a look at what Japanese guys didn’t want to learn about girls’ schools, on the grounds of, presumably, shattering their fantasies.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 4th and 7th of December 2015 250 male members aged between 20 and 39 of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire.

I think men here have read too many comics about girls’s schools, expecting the toilets to sparkle and smell of roses, gleaming classrooms, and nothing but refined talk of flowers.

This photo has little to do with the survey, but I quite like it…

Ne!ne! Vader-kun...kore wa kawaiii!
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Pasta likes and dislikes

Men, how do you eat spaghetti? graph of japanese statistics@nifty took a look at pasta and spaghetti, but sadly did not ask the question I wanted to hear the answer to, “Do you slurp your pasta?”, a rather too frequent event here that puts me right off my food!

Demographics

Between the 25th of December 2015 and the 7th of January 2016 3,426 members of the @nifty monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. No further demographic information was presented.

As is typical for @nifty, not all the graphs they presented were labelled, so when I have text rather than a table for a question, I am estimating the figures.

I love pasta! My favourite is probably just a simple tomato sauce with mozzarella and a basil leaf or two, with potato and pine nuts in genovese sauce a close second. I would rate arrabbiata higher, but it’s difficult to find a restaurant that does it well.
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Working from home: many Japanese keen

< ?PHP include "/home/kenyn/public_html/libchart/libchart.php"; $chart = new PieChart(400, 200); $chart->setTitle(“Would you like to work from home?”);
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“Definitely”, 20.5));
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“Perhaps would”, 38.6));
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“Don’t really want to”, 27.4));
$chart->addPoint(new Point(“Don’t want to”, 13.5));
$chart->render(“/home/kenyn/public_html/image15/work-from-home.png”);
?>
Would you like to work from home? graph of japanese statisticsRather appropriately for today, a day where snow, or according to the news I just watched, over-caution about snow, resulted in massive train delays all over the Tokyo area, the Japan Telework Association released a survey into working styles.

Demographics

Between the 25th and 29th of September 2015 39,929 members of the NTT Com Research monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire. \59.0% of the sample were male, 0.2% in their teens, 4.5% in their twenties, 16.6% in their thirties, 30.0% in their forties, 27.2% in their fifties, 15.8% in their sixties, and 5.6% aged seventy or older. Furthermore, the sample was whittled down to 22,916 people aged between 20 and 69 and in work, either full-time or part-time. From that sample, 43.7% used email for work frequently every day, 12.9% used email once or twice per day, 24.4% used it less than once a day, and 19.0% never. Finally, these 18,565 mail users became the sample for the questions below.

I purposely avoid checking work email from home; I could if I wanted set up my phone to receive mail, but I don’t see why I should do work on my own tab, and anyway, nothing exciting enough happens in the evenings to merit checking email. On the other hand, most of the management I have known in Japan are obsessive micro-managers, so I feel they have to keep in touch to prove their own worth.
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How to act like a last century man in Japan

Although there are lots of articles out there telling people how to avoid looking like an ignorant foreigner in Japan, this is perhaps the first one telling people how to avoid looking like an out-of-touch and behind-the-times man. Specifically, the title was the words and actions that make people look like a Showa-era old guy, where the Showa era was the rule of the last emperor, ending in 1988.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 18th and 21st of December 2015 500 members aged between 20 and 39, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire.

Although I fall into the danger area described below, I only manage two of them; condemning idols for their identical looks, and rather often following through on a sneeze with some extra vocalisation.

Cool Biz is a topic I have covered in detail previously on this blog, but just today I was watching some television and learnt that number 31 refers to the Prime Minister Ohira’s introduction of a lightweight working style following the second Oil Shock in 1979.

Low-Energy Look of the Ohira Cabinet
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Buying a Buddhist shrine

Here’s an interesting topic that I’ve not looked at before, how people select a Buddhist shrine for their home.

Demographics

No specific demographics were given, but a survey was conducted on the 28th of December 2015 amongst people who had requested a coupon from E-Butsudan.com between the 1st of January and the 22nd of October 2015.

Note that the Japanese “Butsudan” translates as “Buddhist shrine”, and is most commonly bought to house the ashes or just the memory of family who have passed away, although some percentage get sold as “working” Butsdan to active believers; the focus of this survey is, I believe, on the first case, people following tradition rather than religion. I don’t know about the stuff E-Bustudan sells, but the ones I’ve seen tend to be cheap veneer over chipboard and seem vastly overpriced as they presumably have a markup as a donation to the sect that are selling them. Declaring my interest, our Butsudan is a donation that we got for free from fellow believers.

Here is a typical Butsudan, but I think this is a working one rather than a ceremonial one as there seems to be no obvious memorial to a passed away person.

butsudan
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What happens in Japanese coffee shops

goo Ranking recently published a survey on what kinds of things happen at the adjacent coffee shop table.

Demographics

goo Rankings asked iBRIDGE’s Research Plus to conduct this survey, where between the 27th and 30th of October 2015 500 members aged between 20 and 39, 50:50 male and female, of their monitor group completed a private internet-based questionnaire.

My typical thing (perhaps it doesn’t bother the Japanese enough to make the list) is ending up sitting beside at best a slurper, at worst (and this happened most recently last Friday) a post-snack tooth sucker; both are enough to make me want to change seats. I see insurance salespeople quite regularly, and the occassional dodgy MLM hard sell going on, but I’ve never had the religious cult stuff, although I do hear from other foreigners that at coffee shops near universities in particular, there is a lot of attempted recruiting going on.

Here’s a picture for No.1 from behind a laptop in a coffee shop; it’s a Mac, so the smug mug is a given…

Coffeeshop Office in Japan
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